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March 30, 1957 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1957-03-30

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1 1

SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1957

fiHE MICHIGAN DAILY

FOUR

SATIYRDAY, MAXC!T 30, 1q57 THE MICHIGAN DAILY FOUR

Yale

Retains

Slim

Lead

in

NCAA

Swim

Meet

1 1 -

Michigan Clings to Second;
Kimball Earns Lone First
Special to The Daily
expected to be behind after these
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - Yale got (Friday's) races," he states.
the breaks here yesterday and "Our best events are tomorrow
moved into a 45-34 lead over sec- (Saturday), and if we get the
ond-place Michigan in the NCAA breaks that Yale got today (En-
Swimming Meet.tile Yal day) we should be all set."
natator, led the Elis with firsts in Diving Strength
the 200-yd. butterfly and individ- Stager feels that Michigan
ual medley, while Dick Kimball should do even better in the high-
won the low-board diving for board diving today, than they did
Michigan. in the lowboard yesterday.
Meanwhile, Michigan's two first First places are also looked for
place aspirants, Dick Hanley and from Hopkins and Hanley today,
Cy Hopkins, were both edged and while Yale will be looking for a
had to settle for second-place fin- victory in the 100-yd. freestyle
ishes. from Rex Aubrey.
Old Foes Meet The biggest question mark is
Hanley made too fast a bid for the medley relay. This event could
victory in his specialty, the 220- very possibly be the deciding fac-
yd. freestyle, and tired near the tor in the meet. Both Yale and
end. This enabled his old rival Michigan will enter teams, and
from Indiana, Bill Woolsey, to Stager has decided to go for the
edge him out at the wire, victory with his best men.
In the 100-yd. breastroke, Hop- Still Close
kins was surprised by Julien Dya-
son of Oklahoma. The Sooner 200-YD. BUTTERFLY: 1. Jecko
covered the distance in the best (Yale); 2. Honda (Indiana); 3. Har-
time of his career, and got too ,Brien (Miami of Ohio); 6. Thatcher
much of a lead over Hopkins. (Oklahoma) 2:09.5. (New champion-
Michigan Coach Gus Stager said ship meet record.)
that if Hopkins had had another of Michigan.)
five feet he would have won the 200-YD. BACKSTROKE: 1. Krepp
race, but his last ditch surge fell (N. Carolina); 2 Pemberton, (North-
rlgtyshort. western); 3. Plourde (Bowdoin); 4.
slightlyhort d.S. Eversman (Purdue); 5. Earley (Yale);
In the one-meter diving Stager 6. Bohan (Miami of Ohio). 2:07.8.
was extremely pleased with the 220-YD. FREESTYLE: 1. Woolsey
first place efforts of Kimball plus -(Indiana); 2. Hanley (M); 3. Farrell
a third place by John Narcy and (Oklahoma); 4. Clemens (MSU); 5.
a fifth for John Murphy. This Cornwell (Yale); 6. Burton (Stan-
helped to offset the points gained ford). 2:02.5. (New meet record.)
by Yale intse freestyle relay.ind 100-YD. BREASTSTROKE: 1. Dya-
y ie son (Oklahoma); 2. Hopkins (M); 3.
The relay was extremely close, Yap (Indiana); 4. Reinke (MSU); 5.
with Yale downing a terrific chal- Hunsaker (Illinois); 6. Lord (Indiana).
lenge by Michigan State. It was a 1:03.0 (New meet record. Event being
battle down to the last men, and held this year for the first time.)
Yale's Rex Aubrey was able to 200-YD. INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY: 1.
overtake MSU's Frank Parrish. Jecko (Yale); 2. Morris (Iowa); 3.
Other Michigan points yesterday Lord (Indiana); 6. McGill (Syracuse).
came from Fritz Myers' fourth- 2:09.4.
place effort in the 200-yd. Individ- FREESTYLE: 1. Yale; 2. Michigan
ual medley. State; 3. Harvard; 4. Wisconsin; 5.
Although the Wolverines are Oklahoma; 6. North Carolina.
presntl behnd y 11poits, DIVING - ONE METER: 1. Kimball
presently behind by 11 points, (M); 2. Smith (SMC); 3. Narcy (M);
Stager still feels that the cham- 4. Knight (Army); 5. Murphy (M); 6.
pionship is well within reach. "We Quick (Iowa).

DICK KIMBALL
,.. one-meter champ

Tribe, Braves,
Bducs Triumph
By The Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz. - Herb Score
and Cal McLish combined to pitch
Cleveland to a 7-1 win over Bos-
ton yesterday.
Altogether the two Indian hurl-
ers allowed the Red Sox only two
hits, one of which was a home run
by Williams off Score who went
the first five frames.
BRADENTON, Fla. - Pitching
highlighted Milwaukee's 6-1 vic-
tory over St. Louis. Chet Nichols
and Gene Conley hurled the game
for the Braves and allowed the
Cards only three hits. Home runs
by Joe Adcock and Del Rice led
the Braves' assault -at the plate.
* * ."
LAKELAND, Fla..- Pittsburgh
scored three runs in the top of
the eighth inning to edge Detroit,
6-5.
OTHER EXHIBITION SCORES
Philadelphia 5, Chicago (A) 4
New York (A) 4, Brooklyn 3
New York (N) 4, Baltimore 2
Cincinnati 7, Washington 2 j

'M' Matmen
Win Matches
In Nationals
Rodriguez, Pearson
Reach Semifinals
Special to The Daily
BULLETIN
PITTSBURGH - Michigan
167-lb. wrestler Jack Marchello
was eliminated in the NCAA
quarterfinal action late last
night, 7-2, by Iowa State's
Frank Powell, leaving only Max
Pearson and Mike Rodriguez to
represent the Wolverines in to-
day's semifinals.
PITTSBURGH-W o I v e r i n e
grapplers Max Pearson and Mike
Rodriguez advanced into today's
NCAA wrestling tournament final
rounds by scoring convincing vic-
tories in opening round and quar-
ter-final matches here last night.
Pearson, Big Ten 130-lb. cham-
pion, pushed past Pittsburgh vet-
eran Vic DeFelice, 6-1, in overtime
to qualify for semifinal action.
Pearson had decisioned Kent
State's Clarence McMair, 9-2, ear-
lier yesterday in his opening match.
Rodriguez, Conference titlist at
157 lbs. quickly disposed of two
opponents to advance into today's
semifinal competition. After pin-
ning Penn State's Earl Foust in
6:20 of the opening-round match,
Rodriguez pinned Dale Ketelson
of Iowa in 3:49.
Experienced M i c h i g a n 167-
pounder Jack Marchello had little
difficulty in getting past his open-
ing match, pinning Hiram's Walter
Kohler in 5:20
Michigan's two other entries in!
the NCAA mat championships did!
not fare as well as did Marchello,
Rodriguez, and Pearson. Wolverine
177-pounder Karl Lutomski was
edged, 3-2, by Lester Walters of
Penn State, and Pitt's 191-lb.
entry, Rory Schirf, scraped pastl
Michigan's Steve 7ervas. 3-2.
Earlier in the day, Rodriguez
had pinned Mankato's Malcolm
and Earl Foust of Penn- State, and
Pearson had won two decisions to
qualify for quarterfinal action.
From early indications, Pitts-
burgh, Oklahoma, Oklahoma A&M,
Penn State, and Michigan all ap-
peared to have some chance of
eventually grabbing the team title.

(Second in a series of articles eval-
uating Michigan's baseball prospects.)
By SI COLEMAN
With the annual spring trip
only a week away, what is the sit-
uation at catcher and around the
infield for Coach Ray Fisher's
Michigan nine?
If there is one position that def-
initely poses no problem for Fish-
er, it is catcher. Last season's reg-
ular, Gene Snider, will be donning
the backstop's equipment once
again.
Famous Names
Fisher will also receive support
from two boys who strangely
enough have the names of two fa-

mous catchers - Berra and Dick-
ey. They are Bruce Berra and Jim
Dickey.
Moving to the infield, Fisher's
main problem is to find a first
baseman and a man to cover third.
It is necessary to fill the third
base position because Steve Boros
who handled the "hot corner" last
year has been moved over to
shortstop.
Keystone Sack Secure
At second base the situation is
as secure as it is for catcher. Ken
Tippery will guard the keystone
sack and along with Boros, should
provide a strong double-play com-
bination.

Two of the chief candidates for
the third base spot are Ernie My-
ers, a senior, and Ralph Hutchins,
a sophomore from Detrot.
Jim Vukovich, one of the many
boys on the team from Flint, is
competing for the first base job.
He was ineligible last year.
Starr Challenges
Challenging him is Gary Starr,
who spent almost all of his time
this past winter on the ice for
the Wolverine hockey team.
Bob Sealby, first sacker last
year; is concentrating his efforts
to pitching duty, and if he con-
tinues, either Starr or Vukovich
will take over.

Fisher Foresees Minor Infield Problem
As Pre-Season Training Draws to a Close

GENE SNIDER
. . no problem
'M' Linlisters
To Head South
Over Vacation

."

Come

to Church

Five lettermen and a pair of
sophomores have been listed by
Golf Coach Bert Katzenmeyer to
make the annual spring vacation
trip to Duke and North Carolina
at the end of 'next week.
Heading the delegation, which
will leave Ann Arbor next Friday,
is Capt. Steve Uzelac. The four
other veterans are seniors John
Schubeck, Fred Micklow and Skip
MacMichael and Stan Kwasibor-
ski, a junior.
The two newcomets are Pat
Keefe and John Law Keefe is a
transfer studcnt from Tulane Uni-
versity in New Orleans, La., while
Law is from Detroit.
The first test for the Michiganj
squad is slated for Ch pel Hill,
N. C.. Thuroday, April 11. The
following day t:ey move on to
Durham, N. C. to tangle with the
Duke Blue Devils.!
The Wolverines will be at their
ususal early season disadvantage
during the vacation be cause of
their limited opportunties for
practice outdoors.I

Sunday

BALL SPEED CHANGES:
Tennis Court Surfaces Pose Problems,

By DALE CANTOR
There's more adjustment in-
volved in the switch from indoor
to outdoor tennis than meets the
eye.
Aside from having to cope with
the elements ad playing accord-
ingly, the netmen also face the
problem of a change in court sur-
faces.
For instance, the Michigan var-
sity tennis team has been prac-
ticing indoors on a wood floor. For
the outdoor season, they switch
to afast-drying composition type
court -- six inches of crushed
cinders covered with two inches
of a special chemical.
Does it make a big difference?
You bet!
Surface Affects Speed
Varying court surfaces have
different effects, the basic differ-
ence being the speed and angle
at which the ball comes off the
surface. Since tennis players- are
called upon to play on varied
courts, they must have an all-
court game capable of meeting all
conditions.
Michigan's Barry M a c K a y
'claims that "the best tennis I have
ever played was in Buffalo, N.Y.,
in the indoor tournament last
month." MacKay also added that
the linoleum court there was the
best he ever played on. He must
have adjusted pretty quickly to I

the unfamiliar surface - MacKay
beat two of the nation's top tennis
players that weekend, Dick Savitt
and Vic Sexias.
However, linoleum courts are
few and far between; most indoor
courts are made of wood and have
various surface speeds. The pro-
fessionals play on a wood floor
which is covered with canvas to
level out the speed.
Few Clay Courts
There are also a few indoor clay
courts, but these are very rare.
Outdoors, tennis is played on
concrete, cement, asphalt, grass,
or some form of clay or dirt
courts. Clay or dirt courts are the
most common, while grass is still
the most important surface, since
the United States, English and
Australian Championships are all
played on it.
The value of certain shots va-

ries according to the court sur-
face. For example, the slice is
most valuable on clay where its
twist is very effective. The drag
is greater, the bound lower and
shorter. It is worth little on hard
courts (cement, concrete and as-
phait) where it bounds too high,
and is easy to hit, while on wood it
is useless.
PA RTY FAVORS'
for
ALL OCCASIONS
Ball Office Supply
213 E. Washington Ph. 3-1161
L

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service, "The Purpose of the
Christian Church." Reverend Press, Speaker.
5:30 P.M. Student Guild.
7:30 P.M.-Wednesday Lenten .Service.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
191 7 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. RedmanMinister
10 A.M. Church School. Unitarian Adult Group.
Professor-Emeritus Roy Wood Sellars speaking
on: Humanism and Evolutionary Naturalism.
10:30 A.M. Junior High Group-Movie: Martin
Luther.
11 A.M. Services. Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: Religion and a Sense of Security.
12:10 P.M. Coffee Hour.
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Program
Ideas for the Eastern Midwest College Con-
ference.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M.'Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Church School, Nursery and Junior Church at
10:45 A.M.
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. Dr. Parr will give
the fourth of the Lenten sermons on "Words
to Remember," the subject being, "The Divine
Insanity of Noble Minds" (Longfellow).
At 7:00 P.M. the Student Guild will meet at the
Memorial Christian Church. Dr. Parr will speak
on "Christ Among the Poets and Dramatists."

BOB MARSHALL'S

0

U

has the Books
has the Bargains

,

11

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
New Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Wednesday, April 3: "The Law of Cause and
Effect."
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 k.c.)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Minister
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship Services 9:00, 10:30 A.M., 12 noon
and 7:00 P.M.
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
5:30 P.M. W.S.F. Supper, Social Hall.
7:00 P.M. Evening Worship, Bill Baker speaking.
"How Can We Have a Conscience?"
8:00 P.M. Discussion and Fellowship.
TUESDAY-
4:30 P.M. Question Box "Courtship and Engage-
ment." Pat Pickett's apartment, 217 S. Ob-
servatory.
9:30-10:30 P.A. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's
apartment.
WEDN ES DAY---
7:15 P.M. Lenten Worship Service, First Metho-
dist Church, Dr. Kuizenga speaking.
THURSDAY-
4-6:00 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's apart-
ment.
4:15 P.M. Bible Study, "Revelation," League.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Asst.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.
Stations of the Cross: Friday, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolp-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy
IN THE
FATHER RICHARD CENTER
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Dr. Merrill Abbey will
speak on "The Sacrament of Owning."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program in the Wesley
Lounge. The fourth in a series of Lenten Talks
on Jesus Christ, "The Significance of His
Death." Pastor of the Bethlehem Evangelical
and Reformed Church.
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion Group. Topic: "Our
Methodist Heritage."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
The Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Blind Alley
of Relativism."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Student panel on
"Growth in Worship."
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vesper Service, with
sermon by the pastor, "With Him on Mt.
Calvary."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: The Language of
Our Faith: 111-"Grace."
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The Congregational and Disciples Student Guild
7:00 P.M. at Memorial Christian Church. Speak-
er: Dr. Leonard A. Parr: "Christ Among the
Poets and the Dramatists."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service

4.

11

I

1t

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
WEEKEND MISSIONARY CONFERENCE
March 29-31
Saturday, March 30
7:00 Dr. Norton Sterrett of India
Sunday, March 31
10:00 Missionaries to speak in the various Sun-
day School dapartments.
11:00 Morning Worship-Dr. Norton Sterrett
5:30 Student Guild
6:30 Evening Worship-Mr. William Garfield of
Korea.
WE WELCOME YOU!
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. C: H. Loucks, Minister
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone
9:45 A.M. Bible Study Class discusses "Isaiah."
11:00 A.M. Sermon: "Temptations."
6:00 P.M. Roger Williams Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Fellowship Program: "Man-Is He
Saint or Sinner?" By Dr. Wilbert McKeachie
and Charles Mahone.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at the.Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper.
7:00 P.M. General Lester I Maitland USAF
(Ret.), Deacon of the Episcopal Church. Top-
ic: "Christianity and the Military."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West 5tadium
:n 1.0A A M . - 11 .00 A K_-7-

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