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February 08, 1957 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-08

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:,;
'I.II Y, I l1 I3RUARY $, 195"1,

PAGE EIGHT

l'liE 11'l1G llti ,yN 1l 11L Y

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICliIGAN flAIL V FRIDAY, FEBRUAkY 8, 195'Z

MahuCman
(Author of "Barefoot Bo~y With Cheek," etc.)

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dcn'as, Camtpus

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Different Levels of Theater Offered in Ann Arbor Area

T

THE DRESS PARADE
what will the American college student wear this
spring? Gather round, you rascals, and light a good
Philip Morris Cigarette, and puff that rich, natural to-
bacco, and possess your souls in sweet content, and listen.
As we know, college fashions have always been casual.
This spring, however, they have become makeshift.
The object is to look madly improvised, gaily spur-of-
the-moment ! For example, girls, try a peasant skirt with'
a dinner jacket. Or matador pants with a bridal veil. Or
Bermuda shorts with bronze breastplates. Be rakish!
Be impromptu! Be devil-take-the-hindmost!
And, men, you be the same. Try an opera cape with
sweat pants. Or a letter-sweater with kilts. Or a strait-
jacket with hip boots. Be bold! Be daring! Be a tourist
attraction!
.
4
But all is not innovation in college fashions this
spring. Jn fact, one of the highlights of the season turns
time backwatd in its flight. I refer to the comeback of
the powdered wig.
This charming accoutrement, too long neglected, has
already caught on with style-coniscious students all over
the country. On hundreds of campuses rock-and-roll is
giving way to the minuet, and patriotic undergraduates
are dumping British tea into the nearest harbor. This, of
course, does not sit well with old King George. For that
matter, a lot of our own people are steamed up too, and
there has even been some talk of revolution. But I
hardly think it vwill come to that. I mean, how can we
break with the mother country when we are dependent
on her for so many things - linsey-woolsey, minie balls,
taper snuffers, and all like that? She, on the other hand,
relies on us for turkeys, Philip Morris, Cinemascope, and
other valuable exports. So I say, if Molly Pitclher and
those other Bryn Mawr hotheads will calm down, we may
yet find an amicable solution for our differences. But
let not our British cousins mistake this willingness to
negotiate for weakness. If fight we must, then fight we
will! P5aul Revere is saddled up, the rude bridge arches
the flood, and the ROTC is ready!
But I digress. We were smoking a Philip Morris
Cigarette - 0, darlin' cigarette ! 0, happy smoke! 0,
firm! 0, fresh! 0, fragrant! 0, long-size! 0, regular!
0, get some! - and talking of new spring fashions, let
us turn now to the season's most striking new feature:
pneumatic underdrawers. These inflatable rubber gar-
ments mnake every chair an easy chair. Think how wel-
come they will be when you sit thrdugh a long lecture!
They are not, however, without certain dangers. Last
week, for example, Rimbaud Sigafoos, a University of
Pittsburgh sophomore, fell out of an 18th story window
in the Tower of Learning. Thanks to his pneumatic
underdrawers, he suffered no injury when he struck the
sidewalk, but the poor fellow is still bouncing and it is
feared that he will starve to death.
@ Max shulman, 1957
Fashions come, fashions go, but year after year the Philip
Morris Company, sponsors of this column, bring you the
tastiest, pleasingest cigarette your money can buy -Philip
Morris, of corris!

LEAGUE COUNCIL-There will
be a League Council meeting at
7:15 p.m. Tuesday in the League.
The room will be posted.
* * *
FRENCH CLUB-A French film,
"From Renoir to Picasso," -will be
featured at the first meeting of le
cercle francais (the French Club)
at 8 p.m., Monday, in Aud. B of
Angell Hall.
After the film Professor Marvin
Eisenberg of the fine arts depart-
ment will lecture on French art.
His talk will be accompanied by
slides. The meeting will be con-
ducted in English.
The presentation will be free
for members of le cercle francais.
Membership cards can be pur-
chased at the meeting, .
. * * *
HOUSE ATHLETIC MANAGERS
-The house Athletic Managers
will hold their first regular meet-
ing of the semester at 5:10 p.m.
Wednesday in the WAB.

By SUE RAUNHEIM
Ann Arbor has three different
levels of theater.
For educational purposes there
is the Department of Speech, sup-
plemented by other student groups
such as the Union Coed Show and
Gilbert and Sullivan.
Then there is the general realm
of amateur, popular theater which
specializes in Broadway shows.
It is typified by the Ann Arbor
Civic Theater.
Lastly, there is the Dramatic
Arts Center, a professional thea-
ter established on the principle
of arena productions of great
drama.
What standards should one ac-
cept when forming a theater?
It Is a Business
Ted Heusel, director of the Civic
Theater, believes in the practical
aspects of theater. "I have seen
many groups form in protest and
then fold up because they could
not get started," he says. He em-
phasizes the fact that "if you
can't make theater a business,
you have no theater."
The Ann Arbor Civic Theater
is 25 years old and has been pro-
ducing popular Broadway plays
on a fulltime basis for six years.
"Our theater is the only one'
we know of in the country that;
is completely self-sufficient," the
director says. The theater depends'
on ticket sales for its entire in-;
come.
"Ann Arbor is a transient town

I

,,.

DRAMATIC PRESENTATION-Three types of acting groups present the theater to citizens of Ann Arbor in different styles. Students
as well as natives of Ann Arbor are entertained by the Dramatic Arts Center, the Ann Ar~bor Civis Theater and the Speech Department.

and most of our actors are ama-
teurs who live within the vicinity,"
comments Heusel.
He adds that he had one of the
"great radio voices from Detroit"
acting as Captain Queeg, in the
"Caine Mutiny Court Martial."
This man was a retired profes-
sional actor who still had the ca-
pability to perform.
"This theater training is an out-

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let for women who are home all
day with their children," says
Heusel.
Understanding is Rehearsing
Discussing rehearsal procedure,
Heusel says, "the actors analyze
their roles in their minds and
then through the process of re-
hearsing, understand their parts
more thoroughly. "We work three
weeks on a show and rehearse
four times a week from 8 to 10
p.m.," he says..
Heusel maintains that the thea-
ter is really a hobby for the people
who work backstage because there
is no glory involved. "These peo-
ple work from season to season
and never even get their names in
print," he says.
Ann Arbor's. Arena Theater
Prof. Marvin Felheim, a mem-
ber of the Board of Directors of
the Dramatic Arts Center, states
that "ours is the only professional
and arena theater in Ann Arbor."
He adds that the Dramatic Arts
Center "strives for genuine artis-
tic standards by presenting signi-
ficant and experimental plays."
He emphasizes the fact that one
must decide which standards to
adopt when producing a play. "You
can offer either August Strind-

berg or 'Tea and Sympathy'," he
says. "However, Shakespeare was
able to combine artistic stand-
ards and genuine popular appeal.
This is fine but not many play-
wrights can do it." he added.
It is a Form of Education
"There is an educational value
in working in the theater," re-
marked Prof. Felheim. "First,
there are the professionals, who
will literally make the theater
their career."
He cited the professional drama
majors. "Then there is a cultur-
al value - we must understand
the theater, as it is a part of his-
tory, as it is a part of a nation.
In a broader sense, the general
cultural heritage of the.,world can_
be found in the theater."
"A third value would be the par-
ticipant's pleasure. People go into
the theater as a nobby, the same
way some people collect stamps
or records." He adds that theater
can be utilized solely for pure en-
joyment.
A Beneficial .Business
"Actors benefit from this train-
ing," he states. They learn how to
work with people, how to under-
stand a character in a play." He
remarks that, by understanding

different characters, one gets a
greater understanding of the hu-
man being in our society today.
"An actor must understand the
inter-relationship of things such
as music and art to character and
sound effects," he says.
"I work on the board of the DAC
because I have a genuine interest
in the theater and this is the only
place I can further my interest in
such a way that it is respectable,"
he says.
Children Have Classes
"The DAC serves many fung-
tions in our town," says Prof. Fel-
heim. "We have children's classes
in drama and dance, and a chil-
dren's play is produced. The cen-
ter often has art exhibits and oth-
er allied artistic activities."
The Dramatic Arts Center also
has panel discussions after each
play has been presented, at which
time many aspects of the play
are discussed. This is not done in
any of the theaters in Ann Arbor.
iProf. Felheim agrees with Ted
H eusel that there is room for oth-
er types of theater in Ann Arbor
but he feels that "the speech de-
partment and the Ann Arbor Civ-
ic Theater are not producing the
type of drama which the Dramat-

ic Arts Center feels

is important."

...aHercules representative
will be on the campus to
discuss with you employ-
ment opportunities in...
" RESEARCH
" SALES
* PRODUCTION
" ENGINEERING
Arrangements for inter-
views should be made
through your placement
office.
JEIRCULES POWDER COMPANY
}tNCORPOFRA7ED
Witm~ngton 99, Det.
Feb. 15, 1957

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FOR MEN AND WOMEN:
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Stevens Co-op, 816 S. Forest
FOR MEN ONLY:
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Nakamura Co-op, 807 S. State
FOR INFORMATION Call Luther Buchele
1 :00 to 5:00 P.M., NO 8=6872
IN1T4E R-COO ea C
1017 Oakland

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