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February 08, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE9 Cx SIX

a' E ly][ C41I.4 :AN U iLY

FRIDAY, F'.EBRUARY $, 1957

~'A~iE SIXTIlE MIChIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1957

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Gagnier Couents on Olympie Games

(First of a series of three articles
expressing the views or Tihigan sia in the unofficial overall point
gymnast Ed Gagnier on gymnastics totals of tut 1956 Games, one canj
as an American and a world sport.) easily consult Michigan's own star
By AL JONES gymnast-Ed Gagnier. who rep-
resented Canada as a one-man
The Olympics had gone along gymnastics team in Melbourne last
quite well for the United States, month.
and most fans back home werGe
quite certain of an American tri- . Gagnier spent part of his time
umnpha in Australia working out with the
hedi.sRussian team, and through his'
Then suddenly the competition in the Games had a
announced a Russian victory. close view of gymnastics as a world
People in the United States soon: sport.
learned that Russian victories in Gagnier pointed out that the
gymnastics had produced the win- Russians weren't expected to pro-
ning margin. The Russians had duce such a dominating team.
netted a total of 36 medals during "Actually," he states, "Japan was
the Olympic games, and 15 of picked to win by many of the ex-
these, including 11 gold (first perts."
place) medals were from gym- In the end, Russia took all but
nastics. one first place medal, and Japan
For an explanation of this gym-
nastics domination, and the sub- Boston 1, Detroit 0 (NHL)
sequent surprise victory for Rus- New York 4, Chicago 4 (NIIL) I

took most of the seconds and
thirds.
"The reasons for this sweep were
many, Gagnier says. "First, the
Russians practice only the Olym-
pic events. These include still
rings. side horse, free calesthentics,
high bar, parallel bars and long
;horse. Previous to the Olympics, I
never saw a single Russian do
;anything other than part of his
routine for the Games. They do
tumbling, flying rings, or trampo-
line, and therefore are better on
tbe remaining events."
"One terrific advantage that
they have is being subsidized by
.the government. They spend al-
most all of their time practicing,
since it isn't necessary to work or
study during the period previous
to the Olympic competition. As a
resuli they were in perfect con-
dition for the Games."

FUSSIAN GYM SUPREMACY:

THE SALE TABLES AT BOB MARSHALL'S ARE JAMMED-
Loaded with carefully selected Bargains in publishers' odd lots
and remainders. Many new titles have been added recently.
Here are a few high-spots-
HENRI PIRENNE
A HISTORY OF EUROPE
FROM THE INVASIONS TO THE XVI CENTURY. Here is the brilliant,
monumental work of a scholar with perhaps no equal among European
historians. Reprinted in 1956 at $7.50.

$39g

A BOB MARSHALL EXCLUSIVE .......... just ..

CHARLES GUIGNEBERT
Despite the hundreds of volumes, since 1863 there have been but two seri-
ous, critical, and objective historical studies on Jesus. Both of the writers
were French - Goguel and Charles Guignebert, Professor of the History
of Christianity in the Sorbonne.
This edition includes a new preface by Dr. R. H. Pfeiffer of Harvard Di-
vinity School. Of the work itself Reinhold Niebuhr (whose point of view is
not especially upheld by Guignebert) writes: "There is no book which will
give the interested layman a more comprehensive account . . . and a fairer
estimate of conflicting evidence."

Published in 1956 at $6.00
a special, only at Bob Marshall's

g39

MARQUIS DE SADE
Selections from his works gg gg
Reg. $6.75 . .. ... ..... .. .... SPECIAL
MONTAGUE SUMMERS
T H E H IST ORY of WITCHCRAFT
AND DEMONOLOGY
ELMER DAVIS WRITES: "Firmly believing in the whole paraphernalia of
Satanism, Montague Summers has a wonderfully good time describing its
nefarious orgies with a gusto which even the reader of feeble faith is apt
to catch."

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Just look around campus. You'll see that the
custom details of this Arrow "University" shirt

Fron any n-le-
re's s uhority

ED GAGNIER
..gives closerlook
Phe
CHICAGO (A)-The NCAA Tele-
vision Committee yesterday agreed
on a 1957 plan for telecasting col-
lege football games, but its nature
will not be disclosed until it is
put in proper language.
Last fall, the NCAA had a com-
bination of national and regional
TV games, a program which the
1956 TV Committee said was the
best received since the NCAA's
control program started in 1951.
This plan may be followed again,
but the committee at its meeting
concluded yesterday had discussed
10 different plans. One with strong
support of the Big Ten called for
the NCAA to set certain basic
rules with the individual schools
and conferences to operate on their
own.

Newcomers,
Depth Aid
Better balance might be cited
as one reason for an improved
Michigan showing in the Confer-
ence basketball wars.
Last season at this time, a lion's
share of the cagers' efforts was
being carried by Ron Kramer, but
help from the sophomore class has
lightened the load for the big
senior.
Kramer doesn't even lead the
squad in scoring, a fact which ap-
peared tG be extremely unlikely at
the season's outset.
Instead, the versatile George
Lee, with an average of 15.86
points per game, tops the squad
in points, followed by Kramer,
with 13.15. But the balance is in-
dicated by the fact that neither
of these figures is really world-
shaking.
On the other hand, Minnesota,
conquerors of the Wolverines at
Minneapolis last Saturday and
Ann Arbor guests tomorrow, de-
pends a great deal on two of its
members-center Jed Dommeyer
and forward George Kline, both
steady 20-point men. Kline, at
6'4", is the tallest man in the
Gophers' starting five.
BASKETBALL STATISTICS
FG FT Ave.
Lee, g 91 40 15,86
Kramer, c 70 44 13.14
Burton, f 60 53 12.36
Tillotson, f 61 23 10.36
Lewis, g 29 35 7.75
Wright, g 26 10 6.20
Tarrier, t 33 19 6.07
Shearon, g 23 19 5.42
Ralsor, g 5 4 1,75
Dunlap, f 2 0 .80
Gualtieri, C 2 0 .80
Prahst, f 0 0 ,0

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________________________________________________________________________________ II
5:30

S TO R

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E H O U R S DAI L Y 9 T O

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5 a o

features ARROW SHIRTS

S T A T E

S T R E E T

A T L i B E R T Y

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1

Regularly $6.00-Bob Marshall's Special .....«... .

$393

I I
I N
A , Campus-to-Career Case History
I - :::-....--.- I
d .
-"x

EDWARD LEVINSON
The early depression-days struggles out of which came the birth of the CIO
. . .Levinson's book is still the best one-volume account of a stirring and.
unusual time in our recent past which has affected everyone since. This is
a 1956 re-issue with a special preface by Walter Reuther.

-.~-
Now you see ili Now you don'l
Trade your case of typists' tension for a box of Eaton's Corrasable Bond.
Then relaxI Your typing errors will be a secret between you and this
talented paper that erases cleanly and completely, without smears,
smudges or tears, at the flick of an ordinary pencil rubber.
Eaton's Corrasable Bond
One of Eaton's 8erkshr Typewriter Papers. A correct paper for every business use
MQRR itS a'
314 SOUTH STATE
FR HER VALENTINE -
, I .
and her jewels - with
T HE P RIN CESS Jewel Case
p, / ,, ,c.,-
Petite case to guard her $
most precious possessions.
Like all Farrington fash-
ions, it's luxurious-in everything but price. Rayon
velvet and satin lining. Leather grain Texol in white,
blue, rose, ivory or jade green.
The Princess Deluxe -for added elegance. Peacock-
plume brocade in cream, blue or rose. $3.50
No Federal Tax
. . * .

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published at 3.5 0-
a Bob Mrarshall exclusive ...... .... .... .

X749
1

An important study on American political practices by 3 Wayne University
political scientists - ARTHUR KORNHAUSER, ALBERT J. MAYER, and
HAROLD L. SHEPPARD. A study of Auto Workers - how they voted in the
1952 presidential election - and why!

.$993

Regularly $5.00 - a Bob Marshall "find" ...,... .

\ . . ..
a .
Planning for growth. Joe Hunt (left) taks with him Robins
mna?, and 0. D. Frisbie, Supervising Repair Foreman. In Joe
put into service every month,
I}
"I'l take a groin
7000 telephones to keep in operation ties. l
I *, , 20,000,000 worth of telephone com- be in a
t pan roperty to watch over....160 peo- creates
pie to supervise - these are some of te "~Bu
salient facts about Joe Hunt's present Lies as
a job with Southwestern Bell. He's a sound
District Plant Superintendent at Tulsa, phone
Oklahoma. t
* "It's a man-sized job," says Joe, who perien
* graduated from Oklahoma A. & M. in confid
1949 as an E.E. "And it's the kind of job your ~
* I was looking for when I joined the tele- "If
1-
* phone company- make
"I wanted an engineering career that find a
ulad oma"aementrponibiamoth

COUNT GOBLET D'ALVIELLA
T HE MIGRATION OF SYMBOLS

THE classical study of symbolism, one of the
foundations of religious archeology. "Endowed
with a vast culture, thoroughly versed in philo-
sophical research, as well as in the methods of
history, he perceived the curious complexity of
the phenomena, the mutual influences of the dif-
ferent civilizations that exchange their beliefs
and their symbols, giving each of them an original
interpretation."

Regularly $5.00
MY SPECIAL

on (center), District Construction Fore-
s district alone, 600 new telephones are
loreover, I wanted that career to
growing company, because growth
real opportunities to get ahead.
t to take advantage of opportuni-
they come along, you must have
training and experience. The tele-
company sees that you get plenty
h. Really useful training, and ex-
ce thatgives you know-how and
ence. Then, when bigger jobs come
way, you're equipped to handle them.
I had it to do all over again, I'd
the same decision about where to
career. Now - as then - I'll take
ving company.

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