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March 26, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-26

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TUESDAY, MARCH 26,1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
...........

FACIP I'llATi'1

TUESDAY,-MARCH..6, 197 -flE MICIIIANIIAIL

JrA"Z l nnr~u'D

Wolverine

Track

squad

Completes

Indoor

Season

0

Sterling Joins O'Reilly,
Owen in Winners Circle

By BOB BOLTON
Michigan's track team ended
the 1956 indoor season last week-
end with good, fair and indifferent
performances in three different
meets.
Twenty Wolverine trackmen
were scattered around the Mid-
West and Canada at meets in
Cleveland, Denison, 0., and Ham-
ilton, Ont.
Good at Hamilton
The top honors went to the con-
tingent flying Michigan colors at
the Highlander meet in Hamilton
Saturday night. Michigan men
also performed well at Denison
but drew almost a complete blank
at Cleveland.
Two Wolverine freshmen, Quint
Sterling and John Toomey fin-
Tennis Stars
Play Tonigh
This is the night that local ten-
nis enthusiasts have been await-
ing.
At. 7:30 in the Ann Arbor High
School gymnasium, Jack Kramer
will present four of the world's
greatest tennis stars.
Headlining the presentation will
be the match featuring Pancho
Gonzales, regarded by tennis ex-
perts as the greatest current court
performer, and Ken Rosewall, the
Australian Davis Cup star who
just turned pro.
Tickets for the match will be
available at the door.

ished one-three respectively in the
300 yd. dash for 18 yr. olds and
younger.
Sterling's winning time on the
12-lap-to-a-mile-board track was
a respectable :34.5.
Varian, Kielstrup place
Two varsity men also turned in
good performances at Hamilton.
Robin Varian placed second in the
1 600 yd. dash to Reggie Pearman,
another Pioneer club member and
Geert Kielstrup took a third in the
mile.
In other action Saturday night
two Wolverines grabbed off first
places at the University relays in
Denison.
Dave Owen, who has been
plagued by a sore hand for the
past week, found the 55' mark
good enough for first place in the
shot put.
O'Reilly Breaks Record
The other top spot went to
Brendan O'Reilly in the high
jump. His 6'6" leap was good
enough to break the meet record
and to give him a trophy for win-
ning the high jump at Denison for
the second straight year.
All in all O'Reilly had a very
busy weekend. Besides competing
in Denison, he was the only Wol-
verine to take a place at Cleveland
Friday night. Another 6'6" jump
gave him third place honors in
that meet.
EXHIBITION SCORES
Chicago (N) 11, Cleveland 6
New York (N) 6, Baltimore 4
Washington 8, Kansas City 3
Brooklyn 1, New York ,(A) 0
Other games rained out

NEW MEET RECORD-Michigan high-jumper Brendan O'Reilly
jumped 6'6" to break the meet record at the University relays in
Denison, Ohio. This was his second win in two years at the Denison
relays.
OLM, MILLER STAR:
Three Freshmen Annex
District AAU MatTitles

Minnesota
To Host Ice
Pla y-O ffs
By BRUCE BENNETT
Next year's NCAA hockey tour-
nament will be held in Minneapo-
lis instead of Colorado Springs, ac-
cording to Michigan hockey Coach
Vic Heyliger, but no action has
been taken on the recent suspen-
sions of the three Wolverine play-
ers.
Heyliger, who returned last
night from the NCAA meetings in
Boston, said the shift in site needs
only final approval by the NCAA
Executive Council to become a re-
ality.
"This is a mere formality," said
Heyliger, "since the Executive
Council has never vetoed a rec-
ommendation by the Rules Com-
mittee in the past." Both the
Rules Committee and the Coaches
Association passed the measure at
the Boston meetings.
Minneapolis offers several ad-
vantages that Colorado Springs
didn't have. For one, Williams
Arena seats approximately 6,000
more people than the Broadmoor
Ice Palace. Also, Minneapolis is
more centrally located than Col-
orado Springs and has a higher
drawing potential.
Two major rules changes also
were adopted at the session. One
is that if a team is scored upon
while it is a man short, the pena-
lized player can immediately re-
turn, to the ice instead of sitting
out the remainder of his penalty.
The other change makes a check
in the neutral zone (between the
blue lines) legal.

FRITZ MYERS
... last home meet

NU Mentor
Resigns Post
EVANSTON, Ill. (A) - Waldo
Fisher, coach of Northwestern
University's basketball team which
finished the season in the Big Ten
cellar, resigned Monday to accept'
appointment as assistant athletic
director.
Fisher, a 1928 Northwestern
graduate, became basketball coach
in 1952 following the resignation
of the late Harold Olson because
of ill health.
MAN! That Uf. of MW.
Hair Styling is
Sharp!

By AL WINKELSTEIN
To the surprise of no one, Mich-
igan kept its perfect home swim-
ming record in tact with a first
place finish Saturday, in a trian-
gular meet against the Indianapo-
lis Athletic Club and the Etobo-
coke Swim Club.
The meet was scheduled as a
warmup for the coming NCAA
Championships scheduled for this
weekend at North Carolina. Des-
pite its second place finish in the
Big Ten meet, the Wolverines are
given a good chance to wine the
Nationals.
Michigan took first place honors
in the triangular meet with rela-
tive ease, but two high school
swimming stars swimming for In-
dianapolis took top individual
honors. Frank McKinney'Jr., one
of the nation's leading backstrok-
ers, and Bill Barton, who surprised
the sparse crowd with a win over
Michigan's Cy Hopkins, were the
most impressive individual per-
formers.

McKinney's showing in the
backstroke was one of the top
performances seen this season at
the Varsity Pool. Seemingly ef-
fortlessly, McKinney won the 200-
yard backstroke in a new pool rec-
ord of 2:06,7.
Barton's performance was no
less sensational. Swimming
against Hopkins, who set a Big
Ten record in the butterfly, Bar-
ton won in a tremendous time of
2:12, which is a tenth of a second
faster than Hopkin's best time.
The Michigan sophomore got off
to a slow start, and was unable to
catch the Indianapolis ace in the
last 100-yards.
As usual, Dick Hanley gave an
impressive performance in the 440
yard freestyle, smashing the old
pool record, and finishing just
four seconds slower than the
world'smark.
Hopkins easily won the 200-yard
butterfly, and Senior Fritz Myers
swimming in his last home meet,
had no trouble in capturing top
honors in the 220-yard freestyle.

Swimmers Victorious
*In NCAA Meet Warmup

Judging from recent district
AAU meet performances of mem-
bers of Michigan's freshman
wrestling squad, Wrestling Coach
Cliff Keen need not worry about
availability of sophomore material
for next season,
Three freshmen grappled their
way to five championships at the
Michigan-Ohio-Kentucky district
AAU meet held at the Detroit
YMCA.
Miller, Ol .Win Twice
Mike Hoyles of Hazel Park, who

PENN STATE DETHRONES ILLINI:
M'Gymnasts .Sixth in C

By AL JONES
The field was..too strong and too
numerous for the Wolverine gym-
nasts at the NCAA meet last week-
end in Annapolis.
Michigan had hoped to raise the
fifth p lace efforts they had,
achieved last year, but had to
settle for sixth in a meet that fea-
tured a host of great gymnasts and
large ten or twelve-man,.teams.
Just Three Men
Wolverine Coach Newt Loken
took only three men to the meet,
and they were unable to match
the point output of Penn State,1
Illinois, Florida State, and the2
others who brought their full team
to the meet.
Penn State, manned with a
large group of top flight gymnasts,
was able to dethrone the Illinois
squad, and gain back the title
which they had held in 1954 and
1955.
Loken described the Penn team
as "complete in every way. They
had at least one good man in ev-
ery event, and two or three in
most. A team like us with only a
few competitors had no chance
in this meet."I

The teams that had numbers
also had one or two top men that
paid off with valuable points.
Iowa, which finished fourth be-
hind Penn State, Illinois, and
Florida State depended on most
of its points from Sam Bailie.
Thirty Points
He scored over thirty points per-
sonally, to rank close behind Penn
State's Armando Vega, who scored
57% and Illinois' Abie Grossfeld
with 44.
Florida State's top man was Ra-
fael Lecuona who along with
Michigan's Ed Gagnier scored
more than twenty points.
Army, which edged Michigan
for fifth place got points from
depth, and scored 14 in the rope
IT COSTS NO MORE.
TO HAVE THE BEST!
"Collegiate Styling
a Specialty"
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near the Mich. Theatre

AA Meet
climb alone, an event which Mich-
igan doesn't participate in.
The Wolverines did as well as
could be expected with a small
team. Ed Cole was third on the
trampoline, with what Loken
called "the greatest routine of his
life," but was edged by Glenn Wil-
son of Western Illinois and Joe
Tim of Iowa.
Sophomore Jim Hayslett did
well for himself, scoring in the
parallel bars and high bar events,
and placed eleventh in the all-
around event, one place shy of
scoring a point for Michigan.

finished second in the 1956 high3
school state meet in his division,
won the 125 -lb. freestyle crown.
Gus Miller of Bristol, R.I., who+
wrestled in the Marines and in
the Olympic tryouts, won the 174-
lb. Greco-Roman title and fin-i
ished second in the 174-lb. free-
style.l
Heavyweight Fred Olm of Niles,1
who finished fourth in last year's<
state meet, annexed both Greco-
Roman and freestyle heavyweighti
titles.-
Other Prospects
Other freshmen who have dis-
tinguished themselves this season
include Jim McNagghton of Ann
Arbor in the lighter weights; and
147-pounders Fred Collins of Kirk-
wood, Mo., and Bob Scott of Al-
pena.
Representing the 157-lb. division
is Art Carlson of Evanston, Ill. Ex-
pected to compete with Miller for
a 167- or 177-lb berth next year
will be Jay McMahon, a hot pros-
pect from Flossmoor, Ill., and Bob
Berg of Johnstown, Pa.
CANOE TRIPS
Total cost $5.75 per diem for e
thrilling vacation in the Quetico-
Superior wilrerness.
For information write.
CANOE COUNTRY OUTFITTERS
Bill Rom, Box 717 C, Ely, Minn.

715 North

gn6vers I
Universit

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COMPLETE
FORMAL RENTAL
SERVICE

Spring is sprung
The grass his rizz
1319 South U.

III

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That's where our bike shop
Student Bicycle Shop
NO 8-6927

Tice &

Wren

1107 5. University Ave.
STORE HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.

e.. ..

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SINCLARIZE YOUR CAR
FOR WINTER NOW!

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Expert Motor-Tune-Up Service
Exhaust System Check
Free Pick-Up & Delivery Service

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BOB MARSHALL'S
has the Books
has the Bargains

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PAULN REED'S SER'VICE
"Dealer in SINCLAI R Products"
NO 2-7840 716 Packard at State NO 8-9587

400 MOM S~ MOM*- - "WA-N- - a=-4

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Have you solved this problem?

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VICKERS'
INCORPORATED
(Leader in Oil Hydraulics)
Extends An Invitation To
Students Majoring In Engineering & Science
To Explore Employment Opportunities
In Engineering, Research, Sales
And Manufacturing With
The World's Leading Manufacturer
Of Oil Hydraulic Equipment
Our Representative Will Be
On Your Campus
FRIDAY,
MARCH 29. 1957

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He's creating America's fourth coastline

T HE grades this gentleman is making have to be
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