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March 24, 1957 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1957-03-24

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SUPPLEMENT

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SUPPLEMENT

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 1957

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Annual Festival
Has Unique Past
First May Concerts Inaugurated
In 1849 by 'U' Musical Society
The annual May Festival is unique.
It's not merely an isolated annual musical fete, but instead repre-
sents the culmination of a definite program of concerts given through-
out the entire season. These pre-Festival series include 20 performances
by the world's most distinguished artists, both vocal and instrumental,
string quartets and other ensemble groups. The country's major or-
chestras and choral bodies perform in addition to the six May Festival
concerts.
The combined series are. carefully planned each season and con-
stitute a serious and educational factor. Together, they provide op-
portunities for members of the University, the community and the
state in general to hear a wide

Pianist To Open
Concert Series
Twelve Soloists, Two Choral Groups,
Philadelphia Orchestra To Perform
Twelve soloists, four conductors, two choral groups and the
Philadelphia Orchestra will be featured in the 64th annual May Festi-
val to be held May 2 through May 5 in Hill Auditorium.
The two choral groups are University ,Choral Union and Festival
Youth Chorus. The Festival Youth Chorus, composed of 400 young
singers from the Ann Arbor Public Schools, will be directed by Geneva
Nelson, associate professor of music education at the University.
Alexander Brailowsky, pianist, will perform in the opening May
Festival concert, playing Beethoven's Concerto No. 3 in C minor for
Piano and Orchestra, Op. 37. Under the directon of Eugene Ormandy,
play an all-Beethoven concert in-i

Noted Group
Will Apear
.a pp1VR
In Festival
Appearing in all six May Fes-
tival concerts will be the Philadel-
phia Orchestra, under the baton
of Eugene Ormandy.
The famous symphony en-
semble played its first concert in
1900 at the Philadelphia Academy
of Music, conducted by Frits
Schell, a German musician.
Schell had founded the orches-
tra the preceding year. It num-
bered. from 80 to 85 players. Fa-
mous musicians, among them
Richard Strauss, were constantly
engaged to play with the organ-
ization.
Because these great names
meant great fees, the orchestra
soon went into debt. By the end
of four years it was thought they
would have to disband .The "Wo-
men's Committee for the Philadel-
phia Orchestra" was formed, how-
ever, and through its work, the
orchestra 'was established once
more.
Carl Pohlig succeeded Scheill as
conductor of the famous group!
and it was under his direction the
ensemble performed the inciden-
tal music .to Mendelssohn's "A
Midsummer Night's Dream," in
celebrating that composer's cen-
tenary.
When the orchestra was in its
13th season, Leopold Stokowski
became its conductor. He soon
-made the ensemble one of the
top in the country. Many musical
compositions made their Ameri-
can debuts under his direction.
Among these were, "Alpine Sym-
phony," by Strauss, and Rach-
maninoff's "Fourth Piano Con-
certo."
Because of illness ,Stokowski
engaged many guest conductors
for the orchestra. Among them
wasw Eugene Ormandy. Six years
after his first appearance with
the group, Ormandy became its
conductor. Under his direction,
the Orchestra became the first
symphony to appear before tele-
vision cameras, performing an
hour-long program in 1948.
The Philadelphia orchestra
was also the first symphonic en-
semle to record and perform for
a sponsored radio broadcast, and
to appear in a motion picture,
Form Society
For Culture
To develop musical culture in
the University and its environs,
and the pountry in general was the
purpose lf the University Musical
Society when it was organized in
1879.
The society organized the Choral
Union Chorus of 300 voices, which
has been in existence through the
years without a break. In connec-
tion with the chorus, a series of
concerts, the Choral Union Series,
was provided.
As a climax to the 1894 season's
concert, the first annual May Fes-
tival was organized. This first
Festival consisted of three con-
certs while the number has now*

range of the best music literature
performed by outstanding artists
in their respective fiields.
Educational Significance
These offerings are planned, not
primarily for amusement and en-
tertainment, - but rather are of
sound educational significance..
They are intended to appropriately
supplemrent, on a worthy and dig-
nified basis, the academic and
professional resources of the Uni-
versity in its numerous other fields.
To adequately portray the mag-
nitude. of the entire musical pro-
gram, it is necessary to review
briefly the early conditions which
led to the founding of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in 1879

-Daily-Norman Jacobs
MAJESTIC HILL AUDITORIUM, HOME OF 'U' MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERTS, STANDS IN TRIBUTE TO DONOR, ARTIUR HILL.
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and to the inauguration of the"
first 'May Festival in 1894. Their A
history comprises the old story of
the "little acorn and the mighty
oak." Sets
In 1854, Prof. Henry Simmons
Frieze was called to chair the
University Latin department. He Hill Auditorium, home of the
was an accomplished musician and University Musical Society con-
supplemented his academic pur- certs, was constructed in 1913
suits by a lively interest in the cul- from funds bequeathed to the
tural welfare of the University and University by the late Arthur Hill
the community. of Saginaw.
First President Hill a University alumnus, was
Frequently "evenings of music" for many years a member of the
were held at his home for inter- Board of Regents and a man who
ested friends. Twenty-five years was greatly interested in the cul-
later, in 1879, he was one of the tural education of the general
organizers and. became the first student body.
president of the University Musical At that time the Regents sup-
Society. plemented Hill's bequest by a sum
The principal purpose of this sufficient to construct the audi-
Society was to provide musical op- torium on what was then monu-
portunities and to "Bridge the mu- mental lines.
sical resources of the University The auditorium primarily had
with those of the community." a seating capacity of approximate-
For its first 15 years, the So- ly 4560, but in 1948 it was reno-
ciety directed its efforts largely vated completely. Larger and more
to the organization and mainten- comfortable upholstered seats were
ance of the School of Music and installed, but a shrinkage of 3501
the Choral Union which gradually in capacity was necessitated.
developed, from a small member- Although lacking in stage ap-
ship to approximately 300 singers. purtenances for such productions
The organization provided occa- as opera performances, the build-
sional choral concerts and from ing once again stands as a worthy
See UNIQUE, Page 2 monument of its generous donor.
'U' Choral Union Evolved

Annual May Festival Program

Thu
AJ
Overtur
Symph(
All
All
Me
Fir
Concert
and (
All
Lax
Ro
Fri
"Aida"
Satu
WIL
Overtu
Concert
andt
"Walru

rsday, May 2-8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
LEXANDER BRAILOWSKY, Pianist
re to "Leonore",,No. 3, Op. 72 ..Beethoven
ony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93 . . Beethoven
egro vivace e con brio
egretto scherzando
nuetto e trio
nale: Allegro vivace
to No. 3 in C minor, for Piano
Orchestra, Op. 37 . ........... Beethoven
egro con brio
rgo
ndo: Allegro
iday, May 3-8:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor
LEONTYNE PRICE, Soprano
MARTHA LIPTON, Contralto
KURT BAUM, Tenor
ROBERT McFERRIN, Baritone
NICOLA MOSCONA, Bass
....... ........................Verdi
irday, May 4 -- 2:30 P.M.
LLIAM R. SMITH, Assistant Conductor
JOSEPH SZIGETI, Violinist
FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS
GENEVA NELSON, Conductor
ire to "La Scala di Seta" ........ .Rossini
to in D Minor for Violin
Orchestra ............... . ..... .Tartini
JOSEPH SZIGETI
s and the Carpenter" ..........Fletcher
FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS
t No. 1, Op. 5 ..... .... .....Bartok
ia .............................Corelli
JOSEPH SZIGETI,
ony No. 4 in A major
an) ............,....... Mendelssohn
rday, May 4-8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor

ROBERT MERRILL, Baritone
Overture to "Die Meistersinger".......Wagner
Symphony No. 88 in G Major ...........Haydn
"Adamastor, roi des vagues profondes,"
..from L'Africaine...:............ .Meyerbeer
Farewell and Death of Roderigo ........Verdi
ROBERT MERRILL
Adagio for Strings, Op. 11 ............. .Barber
"Deh vieni alla finestra" . ........ ......Mozart
"Nemico della patria"..............Giordano
"Eri tu" from Un Ballo in Maschera .. . ...Verdi
ROBERT MERRILL
"Russian Easter" Overture ...Rimsky-Korsakoff
Sunday, May 5-2:30 P.M..
THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
MARTHA LIPTON, Contralto
DONALD GRAMM, Bass-Baritone
GINA BACHAUER, Pianist
JOHN KRELL, Piccolo
Concerto in A Minor for Piccolo .......Vivaldi
JOHN KRELL
"Five Tudor Portraits" . . . .R. Vaughan Williams
MARTHA LIPTON, DONALD GRAMM
Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83 . .Brahms
GINA BACHAUER
Sunday, May 5-8:30 P.M.
GINA BACHAUER
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
RISE STEVENS, Mezzo-Soprano
Overture, "Academic Festival" ....... .Brahms
Symphony No. 3 in One Movement . ... .Harris
"Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen" ......Mahler
RISE STEVENS,
Prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun" ..Debussy
"Connais-tu le pays" from Mignon ....Thomas
Air de Lia, from L'Enf ant Prodigue ... . Debussy
"Amour, viens aider" .............. Saint-Saens
RISE STEVENS
Choreographic Poem, "La Valse" ........Ravel

cluding Overture to "Leonore," No.
3, Op. 72, and Symphony No. 8 in F
major, Op. 93.
In Friday evening's concert,
guest conductor Thor Johnson will
conduct the orchestra and Choral
Union in Verdi's "Aida." Soloists
for the opera will be Leontyne
Price, soprano, Martha Lipton,
contralto, Kurt Baum, tenor, Rob-
ert McFerrin, baritone and Nicola
Moscona, bass.
The opera was written for Is-
mail Pacha, Khedive of Egypt, to
celebrate the opening of the Suez
Canal and the new Italian Theatre
at Cairo in 1871.
The libretto by Antonio Ghis-
lanzoni is based upon a scenario by
the Egyptologist Francois Marlette
and Du Locle. "Aida" is a story of
love, war and hatred and abounds
in intrigue.
Saturday afternoon violinist Jo-
seph Szigeti will play Rossini's
Overture to "La Scala di Seta,"
Concerto in D minor for Violin
and Orchestra by Tartina, Por-
trait No. 1, Op. 5 by Bartok and
Corelli's La Folia.
Also included in the afternoon's
program is the "Walrus and the
Carpenter" to be sung by the Fes-
tival Youth Chorus. The Orches-
tra, directed by assistant conduct-
or William Smith, will perform
Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 4 in
A major.
Feature Robert Merrill
Singing excerpts from L'Afri-
caine, Don Carlo, Don Giovani,
Andrea Chenier and Un Ballo in
Maschera, Robert Merrill, bari-
tone, will be featured in Saturday
evening's concert.
Eugene Ormandy will conduct
the orchestra playing Orverture to
"Die Meistersinger" by Wagner,
Symphony No. 88 in G major by
Haydn and Rimsky-Korsakoff's
"Russian Easter" Overture.
Sunday afternoon, soloists Mar-
tha Lipton, Donald Gramm, bass-
baritone and the Choral Union will
combine to perform R. Vaughan
William's "Five Tudor Portraits."
This Cantata is based upon texts
by the Norfolk poet John Skelton.
The texts range from a robust and
humorous ballad of a tipsy ale-
house keeper to a sorrowful lament
of a little girl for her pet sparrow.
Piccoloist, Pianist Perform
John Krell piccoloist, will ac-
company the orchestra, directed by
Thor Johnson, playing Concerto
in A minor for Piccolo and Or-
chestra. Pianist Gina Bachauer
will perform Concerto No. 2 in
B-flat major, Op. 83.
In the final concert Sunday
evening, mezzo-soprano Rise Ste-
vens will join with the Philadelphia
Orchestra in performing excerpts
from Mignon by Thomas, L'Enfant
Prodigue, by Debussy and Saint-
Saens' Samson et Dalila.
The Philadelphia Orchestra will
perform "Symphony No. 3 in One
Movement" by Harris and Brahms'
"Academic Festival" in the Sunday
evening concert. The evening's
program will be concluded with
"La Valse" by Ravel.
Smith Assists
In Conducting
The establishment of a perman-
ent Philadelphia Orchestra Cho-
rus can be credited to William R.
Smith, assistant to Conductor Eu-
gene Ormandy, appearing with
the Philadelphia ensemble in the
Mau 4h nr rrt

Sink Greets,
May Festival
Audience
GREETINGS:
The Board of Directors of the
'University Musical Society has
full confidence in presenting this
year's May Festival programs that
they will meet with the enthusias-
tic approval of music-lovers far
and wide, both as to numbers per.
formed, and the participating per-
sonnel.
Programs of variety and bril-
liance, as well as of cultural signi-
ficance, will be performed by re-
nowned personalities. Orchestral
works, choral works, solo composi-
tions, both vocal and instrumental,
will be heard.
With the cooperationofcon-
ductors, soloists and organizations
it is hoped that the general vari-
ety and the continuity Will be of
interest' and pleasure, and of cul-
tural value, to students, faculty,
local concert-goers, and those who
come from all over the country.
This sixty-fourth annual M9Tay
Festival, it is hoped, will justify
the ideals of the founding fathers
who chose as their legend, ARS
LONGA VITA BREVIS.
The Board of Directors of the
University Musical Society takes
this opportunity of thanking all
who, by their continued interest
and support, are responsible for
whatever worthwhile results have
been attained.
-CHARLES A. SINK
President of the University
Musical Society
Artist, Author
Szigeti Has'
World Fame
Joseph Szigeti, internationally
celebrated concert violinist, will
appear in the third MayFestival
concert.
In addition to concert fame,
Szigeti holds his own as an auth-
or, having written an informal
autobiography, "With Strings At-
tached."
The Hungarian-born violinist
made his American debut in 1925
as soloist with the Philadelphia
Orchestra under Leopold Stokow
ski. He is now a. United States
citizen with a residence in South-
ern California.
He has made two round-the-
world tours and is currently mak-
ing annual American and Euro-
pean concert tours.
During these past year, the long
record of honors accorded Szigeti
continued to grow. His Brahms
Violin Concerto with the Phila-
delphia Orchestra, under Eugene
Ormandy, was chosen by a na-
tion-wide poll of leading critics
as the best concert recording of
the year.
Master of all styles, classic, ro-
mantic, modern, Szigeti started
the vogue for many a concerto -
Prokofieff, Tartini, Frank Martin
- and for many a composition of
Stravinsky, Bela Bartok and Ern-
est Bloch.
Despite his universal acclaim,
Six-eti take his fam with an

Under Society Guidance

Founded in 1879, the Choral Union has evolved under the guid-
ance of the University Musical Society. Portrai'
Prof. Lester McCoy of the music school conducts the singers. La Folia
When first organized, the music group was comprised of singers
from four local churches grouped together at that time to sing Sympho
choruses from Handel's "Messiah." (Itali
The organization is one of the oldest and largest permanent
SatL
choral groups in the country.
Through the years, the group has added more members, made'
its repertoire larger and changed its name to the one it now holds.
Meetings were spent in discussing i
performance procedure, choral re -NOTE CONDUCTORS- -ID~
hearsals and social entertainment. TE
The Choral Union pledged to
give four concerts for the benefit
of the Ladies Societies of the Pres-
Congregational Churches. O
byterian, Methodist, Episcopal and o l hrhs
The group staged public con- Two
certs in which some of the solo altern"te
roles were taken by artists fromx: aeat
New York, Detroitan Chicago. "MaFst
The attendance, however, was Orma
meager and income was not" his positi
enough to meet expenses. concert ai
With a membership today of At five
more than three hundred singers and by th
drawn from the campus, commu- degrees in
nity and environs, the Choral Un- In 19
ion performs yearly at the May was invit
Festvial and sings in Handel'stundo
"Messiah" during December. <d <:

'I

mandy To Direct Orchestra
noted cOnductors, Eugene Ormandy and Thor Johnson, will
in conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra in the 64th Annual
val.
ndy is the present conductor of the orchestra. He assumed.
on in 1936, bringing to his job a wealth of experience as a.
tist, teacher and radio orchestra conductor.
e, Ormandy entered the Royal Academy of Music at Budapest>
e age of 15 had received his professor's diploma in addition to
piano playing, composition and counterpoint.
21 a long-cherished ambition was fulfilled when Ormandy>:'
ed to make a concert tour of the United States. The tour
be only glittering promises by an inexperienced manager;
oung artist soon found himself alone in a strange country :
mut funds.

- - '- -- .- I

antu the yc
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