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March 22, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-22

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I

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rRTDAY, MARCh 2",1937

iRe

FIELDING TO KAFKA:
Prof. Lange Discusses Development of Fiction

(4

By ALLAN STILLWAGON
An "academic slight of hand"I
was used yesterday to demonstrate
the dissolution of literature's ob-
jective world.
Prof. Victor Lange described
"Three Ways of Modern Fiction"
at Rackham Amphitheater, begin-
ning at the "peep-show" of Field-
ing and ending in Kafka's alien,
paradoxical nightmare.
The Chairman of the German
department at Cornell University
looked back to the fictional story-
telling of the 18th century and
saw authors sure of what they
said, confident of their ability to
recognize the truth, absorbed in
the entity of the human being.
Problematical Beings
"But later, as we see in read-
ing Dostoevski, individual exper-
ience seemed to be insufficient to
the novelist," he declared. "The
human being has become proble-
matical . . . the novel has there-
fore lost the entity of the human
being, respectable and coherent as
it once was.
Transition from narration by
an " I" or "ego" outside the story
to perception of "parables as mod-
els of possible spiritual experi-
ence" advanced rapidly in the
1880's, according to Prof. Lange.
At*that time the individual
came to be considered not as an
entity "sustained by- forms and
faiths," but as a complex organ-
ism, affected by "collective ex-
perience."
Experiences of one person were
no longer related to external cri-
teria. Throukh psychoanalytic
writing, experiences which for-
merly could be generalized to all
men became mythical.
Atomizing Oneself
In 20 years, around 1900, the
individual takes one more step
and loses himself, "atomizes him-
self," according to Prof. Lange.
It is "tremendously significant,"
that the novelist now finds him-
self in a world he cannot interpret
with his ordinary artistic under-
standing.
This is where Rilka was when

worlds were constantly threatened
by catastrophy.
Like a TV cameraman the writ-
er now moves quickly in and out,
coming closer and closer until he
studies only a small patch of skin,
then moving out for a detached,
serene view.
Constant Shifting
The scene shifts constantly,
sometimes out, sometimes in, but
at no point is the reader allowed
to remain in a safe, objective
place. "Especially in Kafka, the
Sorbonne-Leipzig graduate noted,
"He is shocked, overwhelmed, in-,
sulted, abused, never left for one
moment to contemplate a green
meadow, or a clear blue sky."
"Imagery has absorbed reality,"
he observed. "For Proust, the most
terrible thing in the world was
to be unable to visualize experi-
ence.
"Prefiguring experience is more
and more the object of contem-
porary literature, defining, not de-

scribing that which would remain
vague.
Where once the reader wa4 con-
fronted by general coherency, he
is now faced only by coherent de-
tails, focused sharply to "provide
a shocking view of incoherence.
Uncertainty is the key to Kafka's
world."
Instead of asking "Who is X, we
must ask, "Who is who? Rather
than asking, "Where is the castle,
we must ask, "Where is where?"
"Today the novelist must en-
gage in the process of language
as a scientist must analyze," Prof.
Lange concluded.
"At this point of time, the para-
ble as a purely experimental func-
tion ... where experience cannot
be explained by normal chrono-
logical-space relationship ... must
explore the possibilities of human
life.
"In our time," he quoted, "The
whole truth is only in the chorus
of lies."

Organization
Notices
Westminster Student Fellowship,
March 22, 6:30 p.m., Lewis Room. Grad-
uate supper and discussion: "Modern
Rivals of the Christian Faith."
* * *
Roger Williams Fellowship, splash
party at the Tappan School pool, March
22, 7:45 p.m., meet at the Guild House.
k s*
Hillel, Hillelzapoppin, March 23, 8:00
p.m., An Arbor High Auditorium.
. . .*
Hillel, services, March 22, 7:30 p.m.,
Hillel. Speaker: Joseph Katz, "Zionism."
* *, *
The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, postponed, Internation-
al Party planned for March 22 at Lane
Hall.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
sign, production and sales.
Ethyl Corp., Detroit, Mich.-B.S. or
M.S. in Ch.E., Elect., Ind., and Mech.
for Summer and Regular Sales
..Hayssen Mfg. Co., Sheboygan, Wis.--
all levels in Mech. for Research, De-
sign Development, Production and Con-
struction.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W. E., ext. 2182.

lan Reception
For Regents
Candidates
A reception and coffee hour has
been scheduled Monday for Re-
publican candidates Alfred B.
Connable and Mrs. Ethel J. Watt
to the University Board of Re-
gents.
The affair, sponsored by the
Republican State Central Com-
mittee, will be held from 10 to 12
a.m. at the Michigan Union.

I

o

THANK
YOU
For your upport of
United Jewish Appeal.

RUMMAGE SALE
sponsored by the
BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN'S CLUB OF ANN ARBOR
Saturday, March 23
V. F.W.,- 314 E. Liberty
Doors open 8:30 A.M.

the
we

ART DEPARTMENT
UNION ART CONTEST

-daily-Norm Jacobs
PROF. VICTOR LANGE-"Kafka is not interested in views of life,
but in infinite paradoxes ... manners in which statements are
made . . . both straight and oblique vehicles of meaning."

are sure that your cortribu-
tions will be highly appreci-
ated by the 100,000 Jews who
have fled and are fleeing
Hungary. If you have not as
yet sent in your contribu-
tions, you may do so by mak-
ing out a check to United
Jewish Appeal, and mailing
to Hillel Foundation, 1429
Hill, Ann Arbor.

I

AND EXHIBIT

This ad courtesy of
RAMSAY PRINTERS, INC.
119 E. Liberty

he wrote, "It is strange to inhabit
the world no longer."
Each step, Prof. Lange said, was
part of the process of disintegra-
tion of the artist's relationship
vis a vis the world. "Where before
one's writing resulted in clarity
and versimilitude, there was sea-
sickness and dizziness."'
Realistic Fantasy
The novel, "always before a
mirror-image of reality," became
increasingly divorced from actual-
ity.
No novelist had formerly "done
without reality", even in fantasy
one of the main ingredients was
necessarily reality.
But now, as the disintegration

of perspective continued, the writ-
er himself doubted the validity of
what he created. He found himself
in a world he could not discuss
realistically, where he could not
trust his own reliability and per-
ception.
The old taboo that an author
must not reflect upon what he
sees became meaningless. Unin-
volved detachment became no
longer possible, as their created

3rd Floor Conference Room - Union

2-8 P.M. Friday
10-8 P.M. Saturday
2-8 P.M. Sunday,

11

9a

0dmwl

CO-OP OPEN HOUSE

ALL JUNE GRADUATES
Cash orders taken for:

March 22.23

2-5 P.M.

N

Open till 10

Graduation Announcements
Graduation Booklets
Name Cards
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING.i. . Wndow 8

UNDERGRAD WOMEN

MEN

Every nite but Sunday
BOB MARSHALL'S

STEVENS CO-OP
816 S. Forest
LESTER CO-OP
900 Oakland
OSTERWEIL CO-OP
338 E. Jefferson

NAKAMURA CO-OP
807 S. State

GRADUATE WOMEN
MARK VIII CO-OP
917 S. Forest

OWEN
1017

CO-OP
Oakland

MARCH 25-29

10-12 A.M. 1-5 P.M.

L -.
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1'

U

Restaurants

You

Will Enjoy This Weekend

USE THIS RESTAURANT GUIDE TO MAKE
YOUR WEEKEND MORE ENJOYABLE

L

CHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
.2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

4

The Home of
FINE FOOD
and Michigan Traditions
120 East Liberty
Hours-Mon.-Fri. 11:00, Sat. and Sun. 12:00

I) -
THE ART OF ENJOYING SMORGASBORD
Tonight YOU are the artist - for the SMORGASBORD is a
grand adventure and is considered a "classic" culinary art.
Help yourself first to the many kinds of fish, harrings and
seafood. Then return for the salads, meets and cheese. Finally
select from our tasty hot delicacies.
"SMORGASBORD" can be traced back to the old Viking
feast days. when distances were long; but at the end of all Jou.
saya one could find romance and gaiety at the -SMORGASBORD,.
the lonely man besieged with troubles and sorrow could find

Make Your weekend
more enjoy able!;
Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
You wail be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS* ANY TIME
Closed Mo~nday
LEO PING
118 West Liberty
SP~.hone " 2-25624

t

Dine at WEBER'S
Make your weekend Complete

A

(

1.

v

Delicious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
£1 - WaW"

I

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
--m

! I

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