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March 16, 1957 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-16

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r SATURDA'Y', MARCH 16, 1957

TIFF MiCUlFC.AIV 'DATi',V

Ift . -

SATRDA, MRCH18195 TWI! TaWital ' T ,.

PAGE rM

'Netmen
Entire Team
To Perform
In '57 Debutr
By JIM BAAD'
Coach Bill Murphy and his ten-{
nis squad will be representing Mi-
chigan today and tomorrow at the
Collegiate Invitational Tennis
Tournament being held at the
University of Chicago.
With the exception of Barry
MacKay, it will be the team's first
taste of competitive indoor ten-
nis this year. MacKay has already"
participated in the National In-:;.r
door Tournament where he pulled
several upsets.
The Wolverines will be meeting TOP 'ml
many of their future outdoor foes TOP M'
on the inside clay court as five Dick Pot
other Big Ten schools-Illinois, his num
Indiana, Northwestern, P u r d u e are curre
and Iowa-plus Notre Dame, will
be at the two day meeting.
Murphy is taking a full six-man
contingent consisting of MacKay,
} Dick Potter, Mark Jaffe, JohnI
Harris, Dale Jensen and sopho-
more John Erickson. MacKay is
the favorite to win the number
one singles, and he and Potter By3
are given a good chance of taking Like then
the first doubles. sports owe
The tourney is to be a round- behind the
robin affair with each participant The bask
playing six or seven matches. It other athle
will be conducted according to depends he
the usual Big Ten plan in which ager and h
number one players face other season.
number one players, number two
players face number two players, Kurt Ew
etc. his year as
A slight alteration has been ager, .has b
made to overcome the time ele- sity of Mi(
I ment, however. Each player will tem since h
meet all others in his class, but been a grea
only in one set matches until two "and a lotc
finalists have been weeded out. The resp
Then these ..nalists in each class ioi' manag
will meet in a regular two-out-of- works in clo
three match to decide the winner. coaches, tr
Because of this system, no final men and s
results will be known until tomor- tween the
row evening. and the ath

To Face Big

Ten Foes in

Chicago

To da

NEW PILOT FOR CUBS:
Second Division Race Wide Open in NL

(This is the second in a series of
four articles analyzing the major
league basebali teams before the start
of the 1957 season.)
By PAUL BORMAN
Pre-season forecasters tend to
agree on one thing when they
analyze the second division of the
National League, and that is that
any team is capable of finishing
anywhere - in the second divi-
sion.
The four teams slated for the
bottom half of the league are New
York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh
and Chicago.
Phillies Lack Additions
Mayo Smith's Philadelphia
Phillies go into this season with
almost the same squad which fin-
ished fifth last year. New addi-
tions are veterans Jim Hearn,

NETTERS-Tennis Coach Bill Murphy is surrounded by
ter (left), number two singles player, and Barry MacKay,
ber one singles player. All three, plus the rest of the team,
ntly in Chicago for a tournament.

pn'fde.. KURT EWEND

Bobby Morgan and Rip Repulski.
The Phillies, however, aie minus
one of their top sluggers, Del En-
nis, whom they traded to St.
Louis to obtain Repulski.
Of course they still boast their
big guns - Robin Roberts and
Richie Ashburn-but that doesn't
seem to be enough talent to move
them up into the first division.
Manager Bill Rigney will be
under pressure to move the New
York Giants back into the first
division this season after their
drop from third to sixth last year.
If he is to fulfill that task, he
will have to do it with some sen-
sational rookies or veteran come-
backs. Going into this year he has
added only Whitey Lockman to
the squad at the cost of pitcher
Hoyt Wilhelm.
Rigney has also lost his first
baseman, Bill White, to the armed
forces to make his job harder.
John Antonelli and Willie Mays
are perennial stars, but in order
for the Giants to go anywhere,
question marks like Ruben Gomez
and Don Mueller will have to
come through.
Maturity Needed
By moving Pittsburgh out of
last p. 7ce last year, Bobby Bra-
gan ac. 'omplished quite a feat.
Led by Bob Friend, Ron Kline,
Dale Lot g and Frank Thomas,
the Pirates finished seventh, only
one game out of sixth.
If the young stars on the team
continue to mature into big
league ballplayers, things might
be looking up for Pittsburgh.
Bob Scheffing inherited a bas-
ket of troubles when he was given
the managerial job of the Chicago
Cubs. Last season the Cubs had a
dismal year as they replaced the
"perennial" Pirates in the Na-
tional League cellar.
Some new material has been
added in the form of pitchers
Jackie Collum and Tom Poholsky

and catcher Ray Katt from St.
Louis, catcher Charlie Silvera
from the Yankees and third base-
man Ray Jablonski from Cincin-
nati.
Every one of these castoffs has
experienced a good season and if
one or more come through, the
Cubs could be a lot of trouble to
the other squads in the league.
Bolstering the Cub mound corps
will be a pair of bonus babies, Moe
Drabowsky and Dave Kaiser who
looked very promising last year.
All four of these teams have a
few top notch stars, but the per-
formances of their many question
marks will tell the tale of their
fortunes for the coming season.

NBA Teams
Seek First
By The Associated Press
The St. Louis Hawks and Min-
neapolis Lakers, the surpris
teams of the National Basketbal
Assn., meet in a one-game playof
for first place in the Western DI
vision today.
The game will be nationally tel
evised on the NBC network start
ing at 2:30 (EST).
St. Louis, the home club, wor
eight games and lost four agains
Minneapolis in the regular sea
son.
The winner will draw a bye i
the first round of the playoff
while the losing team will play
Fort Wayne in a best-of-thre
series.

}

RIP REPULSKI'
.. .moves to Philadelphia

Come

to Church

DALE CANTOR
motion picture industry,
a great deal to "men
scenes."
ketball team, like every
etic squad at Michigan,
avily on its senic man-
is assistants during the
'Lot of Fun
end, who just finished
senior basketball man-
een part of the Univer-
chigan managerial sys-
his freshman year. "It's
gat experience," he said,
of fun."
onsibilities of the sen-
er are numerous. He
ose association with the
rainers and equipment
serves as a liaison be-
Athletic Department
letes.

Aside from these duties, Ewend
was in charge of making room and
ticket arrangements for the team
when they played an away game.
When a player didn't show up on
time for a trip, frantic coaches
shouted, "Kurt, find that boy and
get him here so we can leave."
Ewend had to spend two to
three hours every afternoon down
at Yost Field House while the
team practiced.
Outside of his many managerial
duties, Ewend also goes to class.
He's a senior in the School of
Business Administration and is
planning on going, to Michigan
Law School in the fall.
'I Like Sports
Why does he spend so much
time being a "man behind the
scenes"? "I like sports," the man
says, "besides, I got the best seat
in the house for every game." (The,

senior manager is the official scor-
er.)
Ewend is 5"7"-"you might call
me a midget among monsters," he
laughs. "People got the funniest
looks on their faces when they saw
me with the team.
'Pretty Shocked'
"Once on a trip, I was standing
in the aisle of the train in front
of Pete Tillotson, who is 6'6", and
some woman asked me what posi-
tion I played. Pete answered, 'He
plays center,' before I could say
anything. She was pretty shocked."
Since he was the official scorer
and sat at the scorer's table all
year, Ewend acquired a pet gripe
-the fickle Michigan basketball
fan. "Wheu you listen to them,
game after game, you realize it.
But, when you hear the spirit some
other schools have-well, the dif-
ference is apparent."

Sunday

Chisox Out-Slug Tigers at Lakeland;
Giants, Braves Also WinExhibitions , USED BOOKS-

By The Associated Press
LAKELAND, Fla. - Minnie Mi-
noso and Walt Dropo led the Chi-
cago White Sox assault on four
Detroit pitchers as the Sox
pounded out a 17-12 exhibition
victory yesterday.
Minoso drove in four runs with
a pair of homers and Dropo
knocked in five with a circuit
clout and two singles.
PHOENIX, Ariz. - New York
Giant hitters had a field day at
the expense of the Cleveland In-
dian pitching staff as they swept
to a 12-7 win.
Hank Sauer's thundering bat
boomed out two home runs and
Willie Mays hit one as the Giants
knocked Cleveland's ace hurler,

Herb Score, out of the box in a
four-run fourth.
BRADENTON, Fla. - Four in-
nings of air-tight pitching by Chet
Nichols highlighted Milwaukee's
2-1 win over Philadelphia. Phila-
dephia's Stan Lopata homered for
the Phillies' lone run.
TAMPA;*Fla. - Cincinnati
scored two runs in the bottom half
of the eighth inning and stopped
Kansas City after they scored one
run in the top of the ninth to
edge the A's, 4-3.
* * * *
ORLANDO, Fla. - Pittsburgh
exploded for a four-run seventh
inning, after being shut out for
the first six frames, and beat
Washington, 5-1.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - A
home run by Mickey Mantle failed
to discourage the St. Louis Car-
dinals as they came back for a
five-run sixth inning to beat the
New York Yankees, 7-4.
NORTH AMERICAN HAS BUILT

-Bob Marshall's

m

i

MORE AIRPLANES THAN ANY OTHER COMPANY IN THE WORLD

U

T"28 Worthy successor to the world famous AT-6

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Heidelberg Concert Choir
5:30 P.M. Student Guild.
7:30 P.M.-Wednesday Lenten Service.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
1917' Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 AM. Church School.
Adult Group-Mr. Richard Wilkie: "Which
Way: The Three R's or Modern Education?"
11I A.M. Services: Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: "The Philosophy of Evolutionary Nt-
uralism."
11 A.M. Junior High Youth Group.
12 M. Coffee Hour.
7 P.M. Unitarian Students.
Program on: "Courtship and Marriage."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Asst;
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon,
Weekdoy Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A. M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.
Stations of the Cross: Friday, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolp-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy
IN THE
FATHER RICHARD CENTER
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
10:45 A.M. Church School, nursery for babies.
10:45 Public Worship. Dr. Parr will give the sec-
ond sermon in the Lenten series on "Words to
Remember," the subject being "No Truth or
Goodness Ever Dies." (T. Carlyle)
3:30 and 4:15 P.M. Instruction classes.
The Student Guild will meet in the Memorial
Church when Dr. and Mrs. Wm. Genne will
discuss "Courtship and Engagement."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
Morning Sermon: "Sowing and Reaping."
Evening Sermon: "A Man Who Knew How to Pray
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 Morning Worship.
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service.
Wednesday-8:00 Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone
9:45 Bible Class Studies "Hosea."''
1 1 :00: Worship: "Temptations."
6:00: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 An illustrated talk on the work with lepers
in Africa
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at the Canter-
bury House.
11:00 AM. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper.
7:00 P.M. Dr. William S. Reed of the American
Board of surgery. Topic: "Christianity and
Medicine."

CONSERVATION TRAINEES
($4802 to start)
FORESTERS
GEOLOGISTS
WATER CONSERVATIONISTS
GAME BIOLOGISTS
FISH AREA BIOLOGISTS
FISHERIES BIOLOGISTS
Must have graduated by June. File applications by
March 27 listing jobs in which you are interested.
Write to Michigan Civil Service, Lansing 13.
DON'T FORGET... I:
TH E
INTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
ART FESTIVAL:
Paintings
Sculpture
Photography
CeramicsQ

6-45 America's first four engine jet bomber

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10.45 A.M. Meetings for Worship.
9:30 A.M. Young Friends Meeting.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizeng, Minister
Wi. S. Baker, Campus Minister
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY-
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
5:30 P.M. Supper, Social Hall.
7:00 P.M. Worship, Bill Baker speaking, Sanc-
tuary.
8:00 P.M. Discussion and fellowship, "Did God
Have to Become Man?"
TUESDAY-
4:30 P.M. Question Box Discussion, Pat Picketts
apartment, 217 S. Observatory (on the "Hill")
9:30-10:30 P.M. Coffee Hour, Pat Pickett's
apartment.
THURSDAY-
4:15 P.M. Bible Study, League.
4-6 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's apartment.
FRIDAY-
6:30 P.M. Grad Supper and discussion, "Modern
Rivals of the Christian Faith," Lewis Room.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William,
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Dr. Merrill Abbey will
speak on "Whatever Comes Brings Christ"
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Wesley Lounge.
The second in a series of Lenten Talks on Jesus
Christ, The Significance on His Life. Rev. Eu-
gene Ramson, speaker.
9:30-10:30 A.M. Discussion group.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Blind Alley of
Materialism."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and program. Colored movie on
pipe organs, with a talk by William Eifrig,
gradSM, on "The Organ in the Worship Serv-
ice."
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Service, with sermon
by pastor, "With Him in Gethsemane."
Friday at 6:00: Married Couples Potluck Supper.
Friday at 8:15: Gamma Delta Social - Scavenger
Hunt.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev, Russell M. Fuller,Minister.
10:45 Morning Worship.
Sermon:,Lenten Series: The Language of Our
Faith: I "Sin."
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The CONGREGATIONALond DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD
7:00 P.M. Dr. and Mrs. William Genne, marriage
counselors for the Clara Elizabeth Fund in
Flint, Michigan, will speak on "Courtship and
Engagement."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
, of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service

I!
It
is _'

6
1

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F-100 America's first operational supersonic fighter

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Minister,

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL

r

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III

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