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March 15, 1957 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-15

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAY, M 15,195't

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. MARCH 15. 1957

... ... . ...f ...+ ..... .....

Stason Calls for Revisions
In '54 Atomic Energy Act

Dean E. Blythe Stason of the law
school called for revisions in the.
Federal Atomic Energy Act at the
fifth annual conference of Na-
tional Industrial Conference Board
here yesterday.
The 'dean said Congress should
specify clearly those areas in which
total federal pre-emption is neces-
sary and those in which states
might legislate "at least until some
federal interest emerges."
Failure to do so, he warned,
would probably result in extensive
court proceedings-a "slow trial
and error process which seems to
be particularly undesirable in the
fast growing atomic field."
"Thorough reconsideration" of
federal ownership of special nu-
clear materials, commercial and
developmental licenses for atomic
enterprise, and patents covered by
the Act is necessary in the near
future the chairman of the Special
Committee on Atomic Energy of
the American Bar Association felt.
He believes that if atomic energy
is to take a really prominent place
in the industrial economy of this
country, it will become necessary
to adjust special nuclear materials
ELI Celebrates
Hun garians'
Independence
Hungarian independence, attain-
ed March 15, 1848, will be cele-

to the normal industrial market
for fuels and related supplies.
However, he felt normal market
operations should be "subject to
all necessary regulation to protect
national security, public health
and safety."
Prof. Stason also criticized sec-
tions of the Atomic Energy Act of
1954 which create "unnecessary
differentials between so-called
commercial and non-commercial
licenses."

p.m., the third in a series on Use and
Conservation of Raw Materials in Our
Economy. His subject: "Problems in
Automotive Industry's Use of Raw Ma-
terials, Especially Steel". This series
of five lectures led by the staff of
the Ford Motor Company and spon-
sored by the Michigan Student Chap-
ter of The Soil Conservation Society of
America and the Conservation Depart-
ment, School of Natural Resources, is
open to the public.
Concerts
Lecture-Recital: Suzanne Bloch, lut-
enist, virginalist, and singer to the lute,
4:15 p.m. Fri., March 15, in Aud. A,
Angell Hall in a program of medieval
renaissance and baroque music. Open
to the general public.
Composers Forum, 8:30 p.m. Fri.,
March 15, Aud. A, Angell Hall. Klavier-
stuecke (Nos. 2 and 3) by Karlheinz
Stockhausen, 20th century German
composer, and compositions by stu-
dents Yalcin Yuregir, Donald Scavar-
da, George Crumb and Seymour Al-
tucher; a discussion period will fol-
low the performance. Participating stu-
dents: Alice Dutcher, mezzo-soprano,
Sheila McKenzie and Marjorie Cramp-
ton, violin; Robert Rickman, viola; Ar-
thur Follows and Camilla Doppmann,
cello; Frances Watson, flute, Joan Gas-
saway, oboe; Bruce Wise and George
Crumb, piano. Open to the public
without charge.
Student Recital: John Heard, oboist,
in partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Master of Mu-
sic at 8:30 p.m. Sat., March 16, in Aud.
A, Angell Hall. A pupil of Florian Muel-
ler, Heard will perform compositions by
Iibert, Handel, Hindemith and Mozart,

assisted by William Donahue, clarinet,
Ann Holtgren, French Horn, Robert
Quayle, bassoon, and Margaret Lasota,
piano. Open to the public without
charge.
Student Recital: John Lawrence Rob-
inson, organist, in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Music, at 4:15 p.m. Sun.,
March 17, in Hill Auditorium. A pupil
of Marilyn Mason Brown, Robinson
will perform compositions by Buxte-
hude, Bach, Alain, vierne and Reger.
Open to the general public without
charge.
Sigma Alpha Iota Professional Mu-
sic Fraternity for Women Annual Con-
temporary American Musicale Sun.,
March 17, in Aud. A, Angell Hall, at
8:30 p.m. Performers will be Helen
Mendelson, Pat Martin, Linda Reck,
Sally Meyers, Jane Hirschmann, vir-
ginia Shapoe, and Sheila McKenzie.
Sue LaCore, Art Follow, Robert Rick-
man, guests of SAI, will also be on the
program. Works of Copland, Griffes,
Pearle Reiman, Finney, and Yuregir
will be included.
Organ Recital by Robert Noehren,
University organist, 8:30 p.m. Mon.,
March 18, in Hill Auditorium. The All-
Bach program will 4nclude Fantasia in
C minor, Fugue in G major, Trio-
Sonata No. 4 in E minor, Prelude and
Fugue in A minor, and seven Chorale

Preludes. Open to the general public
without charge.
Academic Notices
Kothe-Hildner Annual German Lan-
guage Award offered to students in
courses 31, 32, 34, 35, and 36. The con-
test, (a translation competition from
German to English) carries two sti-
pends of $45 and $30 respectively, and
will be held from 2-4 p.m., Wed., March
20. Students who wish to compete
should apply at the German Depart-
ment Office by Mon., March 18.
Concentrates in Psychology interested
in entering the Senior Honors Course
for 1957-58 should contact Prof. R. W.
Heyns in Room 1012, Angell Hall before
March 25.
Results of the language examination
for the M.A. in history are posted in
3601 Haven Hall.
Five-week grades for all Engineering
Freshmen are due in the Secretary's
Office, 263 West Engineering Building
on Mon., March 18.
Anatomy Seminar in Room 2501 East.
Medical Building. Coffee will be served
one-half hour before in Room 3502 of
East Medical Building. March 15, 4:00
p.m. Dr. Richard C. Schneider, Depart-
ment of Surgery: "Moving Pictures

Showing the Effects of Hemispherec-
tomy in Clinical Cases," with discus-
sion by Dr. Elizabeth C. Crosby, De-
partment of Anatomy.
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., March
15, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Stuart A.
Hoenig of the Armour Institute of
Technology will speak on "Capture of
Meteors by the Earth."
Doctoral Examination for Margery
Roberta Ross, Education; thesis: "In-
fluence Affecting the Development of
Undergraduate Social Work Education
in Seven Michigan Colleges", Mon.,
March 18, East Council Room, Rack-
ham Building, at 2:30n pm. Chairman,
H. C. Koch.
Events Today
Joint Coffee Hour: I.C.C. and the
Office of Religious Affairs. The Art
Festival paintings will be on display.
Lane Hall, Fri., March 15, 4:15-5:30 p.m.
Personnel Requests:
Placement Notices'
U.S. Air Force is interested in em-
ploying Librarians at the GS-7 level
in Germany, France and Japan. There
is also a position in Germany for an
Administrative Officer at the GS-11
level in the Services Division. There
are openings for Supervisory Adminis-

trative Officer (Admin. and Payroll) at
GS-9 in Japan, General Engineer -
GS-13 in Korea, and Supervisory Ac-
counting Officer -- GS-7 in the Pacific
area.
N.Y. State Civil Service announces
the Professional Entrance Test open to
Juniors, Seniors, and Graduates. The
exam is open to any qualified citizens
of the U.S. and applications will be
accepted up to April 19, 1957. There
are positions in Science, Engrg., Li-
brary, Sales and Business, Law, Psych.,
Administration, Welfare, etc. Applica-
tions and announcements are avail-
able at the Bureau of Appointments.
SUMMER.:

Western Gear Corp., Lynwood, Calif.,
is interested in Mechanical Engrg. for
Summer Employment.
West Side Community House, Cleve-
land, Ohio, offers a Summer Work-
shop in Group Leadership to students
in Soc., Psych., and Ed. Students re-
ceive an honorarium for expenses while
they learn.
Tamakwa Camp for Boys and Girls,
Algonquin Park, Ontario -- represen-
tative will interview at the Michigan
Union on Saturday, March 16th, Room
3K, from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., for Coun,
selors.
For information on any of the above,
contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 3371.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

1'l

One of Melville'%
greatest, yet least,
known, novels - a
powerful, symbolic story
of entangled blood
relations.
512 pages, $2.45.
An EVERGREEN
soft-cover booki

v

1 rrwn r

(Continued from Page 4)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Lectures
Stanley J. Gillen, assistant general
manager, Steel Division of the Ford
Motor Company, will speak in the Kel-
logg Auditorium Fri., March 15 at 4:15

CAMP COUNSELLOR OPENINGS
- for Faculty, Students and Graduates -
THE ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS
. comprising 250 outstanding Boys, Girls, Brother-Sister and Co-
Ed Camps, located throughout the New England, Middle Atlantic
States and Canada.
. .INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concerning summer employment as
Counsellors, Instructors or Administrators.
. . . POSITIONS in children's camps, in all areas of activities, are
available.
WRITE, OR CALL IN PERSON:
ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS - DEPT. C
55 West AN Stret Rnnm7d3 pw- ve A N Yv

'I

brated at 8 p.m. today at Rackham
Auditorium.
The celebration, being sponsored
by the English Language Institute,
will honor the newly arrived Hun-
garian students at the Institute.
G. Erdelyi, a Hungarian student,
will give a historical sketch on the
Hungarian national holiday. Also
included in the program will be theC
Hungarian National anthem and
"Nemzeti-eal" by Piofi, a poem
which will be read by Endre Lef-
kovits. Hungarian songs and Hun-
garian folk dances by Mrs. Ethel
Csomose and Arpad Csomor will
conclude the program.
Special guests will include Ann
Arbor area residents of Hungarian
descent
L. Goszleth, S. A. Toth, L. ala- p
szi, M. Teghze-Gerber, S. Bartha,
M. Szatacs and T. Zarga will be
honored at the i0SLh anniversary
of Hungarian independence

r 4ZU aTreer, noom 143 NeW Tom .SO, N.T.

I

Graduating Seniors
In Civil Engineering
WORK IN
CALIFORNIA
with State Dept. of Water Resources
or State Division of Highways
California offers unlimited engineering op-
portunities in two major activities.
Division of Highways' huge freeway build-
ing program offers wide choice of work loca-
tions and rotating engineering assignments.
Department of Water Resources handles
State's unprecedented water development
program. Work includes design and con--
struction of big dams, power plants and
statewide aqueduct system; water quality and
flood control,
$436 to start -- Early Raise
INTERVIEW ON YOUR CAMPUS
MARCH 25
Get illustrated booklets and sign up for
interview at your Campus Placement Office.

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If you are jlanning one, we sn-
cerely. will enjoy helping you in
working out the details of your
printed needs.
We offer tasteful, beautiful wed-
ding invitations and announcements,
printed, embossed, or engraved and
co mpete accessories.

Ar

1ceddin0

+,

TUNE-UP

omplete Winterizing
Tires & Batteries

A'

Free Pick-Up & Delivery

ckard Hill Gulf Service

PRINTERS
119 E. Liberty

,jav

/2Binlerj, inc.

I4

, ENGRAVERS, STATIONERS

r4

Phone NC

600 Packard at Hill - NO 5-5300

)8-79001

I

- . e w n moms

1s

& & & A, & &

Restaurants

ou

Will Enjoy This

Weekend

USE THIS RESTAURANT GUIDE TO MAKE YOUR WEEKEND MORE ENJOYAI

BLE

CHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads &Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

IL

We think
OLD ST. PATRICK
would like to have his day
CELEBRATED SAT.,
MARCH 16th
opening time 11 A.M.
HATS, BALLOONS, AND EVEN

2

Make Your weekend
more enjoyable!
Our chefs are ready to prepare the most delicious food
for your enjoyment.
You will be served the finest in
Cantonese and American food
TAKE-OUT ORDERS ANY TIME

THE BREW

WILL BE THE COLOR OF EMERALD.
120 EAST LIBERTY

k- I

THE ART OF ENJOYING SMORGASBORD1
Tonight YOU are the artist - for the SMORGASBORD is a
grand adventure and is considered a "classic" culinary art.
Help yourself first to the many kinds of fish, berriegs and
seafood. Then return for the salads, meets and cheese. Finally
select from our tasty hot delicacies.
4SO5RGASBORD" can be taced back to the old Viking
feast days, when distances were long; but at the end of all jours
says one could find romance and gaiety at the SMORGASBORD."
the lonely man besieged with troubles and sorrow could tad
solaew at the "SMORGASBORD, a young maiden in seerah of
lnwa nd .ansa ma...fi.d theat..h.,a..av NSMiSRASOn.0

i

'I
Dine at WEBER'S
Make your weekend complete

a .
i
4
t

Closed Monday
LEO PING
118 West...ert.
Phone NO 2-5624

I

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Delleious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
===WMM= c

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
4NVI A EWrL A MD =.

I

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I

A li 1111 111

1

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