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March 15, 1957 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-15

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PAGE SIX

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, .MARCH 15,1957

PAGE six THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAZ MARCH 15, 1957

Baseball Bits
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (P) - Doctors estimated Skowron, ex-
New York Yankee first baseman Purdue University football star,
Bill Skowron became the first ma- would be lost to the world cham-
oar casualty of baseball's spring
training season Thursday. X-rays pions for three weeks.
revealed he suffered a fractured The husky slugger was hit on
right thumb in Wednesday's ex- the hand by a pitch from Jack
hibition game against Philadelphia Sanford, a Phillies' rookie right-
at Clearwater. hander, in the fourth inning.

Pro

Fraterity

Teams

(;ain

Finals

FO WLER'S
delivered
By Ann Arbor
SPEEDY DELIVERY
With Warming Oven Equipped Truck
for 50c per order
DELIVERIES MADE EVERY .HOUR
From 7:30P.M. to 11 :30
Phone NO 2-9442
FOWLER'S CoffeeShop
We also CHICKEN -SHRIMP -SCALLOPS
deliver: STEAKS - CHOPS - SANDWICHES
2204 West Stadium Blvd., Corner Liberty

JIM HAYSLETT
.. All Around Threat

'M' Gymnasts To Perform
In NCAA Meet Next Week
By AL JONES
will again take the title. They
Annapolis, here we come. have defending all-around titlist}
This is the thought that per- in Don Tonry, plus Abie Gross-
vades the minds of Wolverine gym feld, who has outdone Tonry most
coach Newt Loken and three of of this season.
his top performers. The Wolverines will be the sec-
Loken, along with all-around ond strongest team from the
men Ed Gagnier and Jim Hays- Midwest. Gagnier, who outpointed
lett, and trampolinist Ed Cole will Grossfeld and Tonry in the Big
be leaving for the NCAA Meet Ten meet, and Hayslett, who was}
next week, held on the grounds fifth in the Big Ten all-around,
of the Naval Academy, at Anna- should both place high in a va-
polis, Md., March 22 and 23. riety of events, while Ed Cole, Big
As in the Big Ten Meet, the Ten trampoline titlist should be
defending champion is Illinois, the favorite in that event.
and they are again favored to
take the title. However, the Illini
will have competition from squads D onsoe
across the country.
East Strong j C u
The East is exceptionally strong
this year, and will be sending
title-challenging squads from
Penn State, Syracuse, Army and
Navy. The San Francisco Dons, win-t
Another team that the Big Ten ners of the NCAA basketballa
is familiar with is Florida State. championship for the past twoa
They competed in the Midwest years, open the defense of their
Open in December, and finished title Friday night with no moree
second, ahead of every Big Ten than a 50-50 chance of making theI
team but Illinois. semifinals.-.
From the Pacific Coast will The Dons, whose two-year win-
come two tough groups, UCLA ning streak creaked to an end
and California, both perennial last December, oppose Idaho Statet
powers in the gymnastics world. at Corvallis, Ore., in the first4
NCAA Tournament game.
Illinois Picked Four Sites
Although the actual power of This is one high spot of the four
these teams can't be judged un- regional playoffs that will cut the
til the preliminary action next NCAA field to four teams for theT
Friday, it appears that the Illini semifinals and finals at Kansas

NHL Standings
W L T P
Detroit 35 19 12 82
Montreal 33 22 11 77
Boston 32 23 11 75
New York 25 28 13 63.
Toronto 19 31 15 53
Chicago 16 37 14 46
Last Night's Scores
Detroit 3, Chicago 2
Montreal 8,. Toronto 4
Spring is in the air
so is your need for a
Blended Hair Cut.
. c i. Sa4ep4
715 N. University
Read the Classifieds

Phi Delta Phi Cops Game;
'Phi Alpha Kappa Also Wins

ED COLE
. . . Big Ten Champ
rYin Defense
ge Crown
City next week. Others are sched-
uled Friday night and Saturday
at Philadelphia, Lexington, Ky.,
and Dallas.
If San Francisco survives these
eliminations, the chances are the
Dons will wind up as the outsider
in a group that could include un-
defeated North Carolina, Kansas
and Kentucky-the nation's top
three college teams in the sea-
son's final Associated Press rank-
ing poll.
Top Teams Play
Elsewhere, it'satop- r a n k e d
North Carolina against Canisius,
and Syracuse against Lafayette at
Philadelphia. Second-ranked Kan-
sas and Wilt "the Stilt" Cham-
berlain meet fourth-ranked South-
ern Methodist and Jim Krebs while
Oklahoma City, ranked ninth in
the AP poll, plays tenth-rated St.
Louis at Dallas. Kentucky plays
Pittsburgh and Michigan State
meets Notre Dame at Lexington.
This marks Kansas' fifth ap-
pearaice in the 19-year-old NCAA
tournament. The Jayhawks won
the title in 1952.

By PAUL BORMAN
Phi Alpha Kappa toppled Nu
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Phi beat
Alpha Chi Sigma as both squads
qualified for the professional fra-
ternity first place finals in last
night's I-M action.
Phi Alpha Kappa didn't break
away from the Nu Sigs until the
final quarter. Going into the last
stanza the score was tied at 23 all,
but Phi Alpha Kappa controlled
the boards and made their shots
count to win the tussle.
Bos Scores 18
Topping the game's scoring was
Ron Bos of Phi Alpha Kappa with
18 points. Dick Van Schoick's 10
points were tops for the losers.
Phi Delta Phi widened its mar-
gin over Alpha Chi Sigma in the
final period after three see-saw
quarters to clinch the playoff slot.
Second place pro-fraternity
berths were captured by Phi Al-
pha Delta and the Law Club.
In a very tight game, Phi Al-
pha Delta edged Psi Omega 41-40.
Jack Fingersh topped Phi Alpha
Delta's scoring with eleven points.
The Law Club wasn't threat-
ened as it scored a 27-16 victory
over Delta Sigma Delta to qualify.
High man for the victors was
Fred Furth with eight points.
Third Place
Both Phi Epsilon Kappa and
Alpha Kappa Psi had easier times
as they qualified for the third
place playoffs.
Phi Epsilon Kappa topped Phi
Chi 37-23. Paul Pelkki and Pete
Gray led the scoring parade as
they registered 15 and 12 points
respectively.
Alpha Kappa Psi coasted to a
31-18 triumph over Phi Delta Chi.
Phi Rho Sigma beat Alpha
Omega, 33-12, to qualify for the
fourth place playoffs. It will face
Delta Sigma Pi in the finals. Wal-
ly Roeser was high point man for
the winners with eight.
There was also a lot of action
in the Independent League last

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Make your
SPRING
OUTI NGS.

/ice
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Congratulations, Michigan 1957 Graduating Class
From KING-SEELEY CORP., Ann Arbor, Michigan
What are your plans for Future Employment?
0 We have opportunities for graduates of electrical and mechanical engi-
neers, engineering physics graduates, and graduates with B.S. in physics
in our engineering laboratories.
0 We also have opportunities for graduates with B.B.A., B.S., B.A., and
industrial engineering degrees in standards, production, controls, plant
layout, estirmating, accounting, production supervision, and personnel.

complete

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Information on our organization is in the placement4
arrange for a personal interview.

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at its

I;c~t

night, particularly In the first
place semi-finals.
In a thriller which went down
to the wire, Evans Scholars edged
Gomberg Older Element, 32-31.
Gomberg Older Element's Lar-
ry Schroder led the scoring with
17 points while Dick Gates and
Bill Klink were tops for Evans
Scholars with 10 points apiece.
Qualifying to meet the Evans
Scholars in the first place playoff
proved to be easy for the Seldom
Seen Kids as they trounced Mich-
igan Christian Fellowship, 75-23.
26-13 at Half
The Seldom Seen Kids posted
a 26-13 halftime lead and in the
second half ran away with the
game. Tom Singer and Stan Gass
paced the winners with 24 and
19 points respectively.
In the second place semi-finals
the CMS juniors squeaked by For-
esters, 40-39, and the Pillpushers
won over ERI, 25-21.
The Latvians won over the
Merry Men, 2-0, on a forfeit in
the fourth place semi-finals.
swimming
Tests Paced
By Phi Delts
By STEVE SALZMAN
Individual and team efforts
were the mark for the night, as
six qualifiers for each event were
picked for the I-M fraternity
swimming finals.
Phi Delta Theta posted the
highest number of qualifiers with
five. Bernie Rinella led the Phi
Delts by qualifying in the 50-yd.
and 100-yd. free style events. The
Phi Delts also came home first in
the all-fraternity 150-yd. medley
relay with the fine time of 1:28.5.
Best Times
Otto Gutowski and Ronald Pud-
duck of Sigma Phi Epsilon and
Alpha Tau Omega, with the times
of 0:29.4 and 0:29.5 respectively
in the 50-yd. backstroke, turned
in the best competitive clockings
of the night.
Quick thinking, by the medley
team of Sigma Chi, helped them
to qualify in the 150-yd. medley
relay. As their second man left the
edge of the pool, he was disquali-
fied. The reason for this was that
he used the fishtail kick which
was understood by Earl Riskey,
I-M director, to be illegal. Sigma
Chi finished the race anyway, and
tied Phi Delta Theta for first.
After the official times were re-
corded, Riskey decided to let Sig-
ma Chi compete with the Sig Eps
f or the last qualifying berth. Sig-
ma Chi raced to an easy victory,
winning by better than ten sec-
onds.
Relay Winners
Chi Psi, with the relay team of
Jim Clatworthy, Al Flynn, Dick
Degner, and Stu Smith, turned in
the extremely fast time of 1:45,1
in the 200-yd. free style relay.
Smith, the anchor man for Chi
Psi, also led the field of qualifiers
in the 50- and 100-yd. free style
events.
Globetrotters
To Aid Louis
CHICAGO (RP) - The Harlem
Globetrotter and other friends
plan to put on a benefit perform-
ance for Joe Louis March 29 in
Washington, D.C.
The plans, announced Thurs-
day at the headquarters of the
Globetrotter basketball team, are
designed to raise funds to help
the former heavyweight champion
pay his federal income tax arrear-

age, estimated at more than one
mlilion dollars.
A spokesman said Louis will re-
ceive a certain percentage of the
net receipts, but he added he
didn't know what percentage has
been fixed.

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Once upon a time, when the
world was really evil, and a
thief lurked behind every bush,
cautious men had their shirts
painted on! The reason for this
is explained by a perceptive
saying of those days:
"Forsooth, nothing deters
those rapscallions about town.
They'll steal anything that
isn't buttoned down."
Rough days - particularly
for the shirt business, what
with painters picking up all
the profits. Until, suddenly,
an idea of genius appeared.
The button-down shirt! This
shirt was actually buttoned on
to the chest of the wearer, making
it absolutely steal-proof!
Today, in these honest times,
we still feel its influence. It is

cY t ht SollVEurope
YOU have to JileI

the true ancestor of that glori.
ous style-the shirt with the
button down collar! Isn't his-
tory interesting?
Van Heusen-because they
know so much about the but-
ton-down -has done more
with it than anybody else.
Take our new line called the
Van Ivy, for instance. Here
are button-downs in tartan
checks and stripes. Van Ivys
look marvelous with suits and
sport coats, and worn open at
the neck give you a roguish
look. They also have a button
on the back of the collar, for
authenticity's sake. See them.
$4.00 in short sleeve, $5.00
long sleeves.
Phillips-Jones Corp., 417
Fifth Ave., New York 16, N.Y.

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