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March 14, 1957 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-14

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PAGE !SEVEN

THURSDAY, MARCH 14,1957'

TIRE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

; A xx{W! coMU ri1N

Michigan SextetArrives in Colorado

Sport Shorts

3

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Colorado College, Clarkson"
Open Ice Playofs Tonight

Sigma Chi Downs Sigma Alpha Epsilon
To Enter Intramural B' Fraternity Finals

By BRUCE BENNETT
Michigan's hockey team arrived
in Colorado Springs, Colo., late
yesterday afternoon hnd took a
light workout at the Broadmoor
Ice Palace last evening in prepara-
tion for its first round NCAA tour-
nament game tomorrow night with
Harvard.
The tenth annual classic will get
underway tonight with Colorado

and defenseman Mike Buchanan
had been declared ineligible.
Plane Delayed
Then, after boarding the giant
56-passenger airliner "Broadmoor
Special," also carrying the Har-
vard and Clarkson seams, they en-
countered a storm over the plains
and Rockies and weren't able to
land in Colorado Springs.
The plane made a landing in
Denver and the teams took buses
the rest of the way, approximately
60 miles.
Thb absence of Maxwell for the
series will place an added burden
on Michigan's highly regarded
"second line" of Neil McDonald,
Ed Switzer and Dick Dunnigan.
The line has "blossomed" tremen-
dously in the last month and end-
ed the season with 30 goals. Dun-
nigan, the team's leading scorer
with 27 points in the Western In-
tercollegiate Hockey League, has
twelve of these goals.
Collection of Stars
Rarely has such a collection of
stars graced the same ice arena at
once as those who skated at the
Broadmoor Ice Palace yesterday.
In addition to Michigan stars
To'm Rendall, Bob Schiller and
Bob Pitts, there was Clarkson All-
American Eddie Rowe. In Ed Mac-
Donald ,the Knights have probably
the best goalie in the East.
Their opponent tonight, Colo-
rado College, practiced earlier in
the day.
NHL SCORE
Boston 2, New York 1

By SI COLEMAN
known. Dave Bowers hit for seven
Sigma Chi's 'B' basketball team of his total 16 points in the clos-
qualified for the first place finals ing minutes of the contest to
by defeating SAE, 38-28, last clinch it for the Phi Delts.-
night in I-M play. Only one point separated these

ED SWITZER
.. faces tough task

NEIL McDONALD
... shoulders extra load
College meeting Clarkson College.
The winner of tonight's encounter
will meet tomorrow night's win-
ner in the finals Saturday evening.
It was a stormy day on two
4 scores for Vic Heyliger and his
Wolverines,. Shortly before leaving
Ann Arbor they were informed that
high-scoring star Wally Maxwell

ICe Coverage
In keeping with The Daily's
policy of on-the-spot coverage,
Hockey Editor Bruce Bennett
hops a plane for Colorado
Springs today to send back a
first-hand account, of the
NCAA hockey tournament.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Brooklyn 9, Chicago (A) 4
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 1
Cincinnati 11, Milwaukee 4
Kansas City 5, St. Louis 4
Philadelphia 6, New York (A) 5
Washington 3, Detroit 2
Cleveland 9, Baltimore 5
Chicago (N) 9, New York (N) 3
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Sigma Alpha Epsilon got off to'
a fast 6-2 lead in what turned out
expectedly to be a fast and rough
basketball game.
But Sigma Chi's Gordon Mor-
row, hitting from all angles, kept
his ball club in the game and
closed the gap to 17-16 at the
half.
Lead Changes
Early in the second half the
lead exchanged hands seven times
until, with five minutes left in
the game, Sigma Chi gained the
lead and won going away.
In the other first place game
of the evening, Phi Delta Theta
downed ATO, 28-21, to earn the
right to play Sigma Chi in the
finals.
This, too, proved to be an ex-
tremely close encounter. Not un-
til the last two minutcs of the
game was the outcome really

two teams at the half. Shooting
by both teams accounted for the
low 12-11 halftime margin. But
with Bowers getting hot Phi Delta
Theta eked out the victory.
Help Own Cause
The Phi Delts helped their
cause byfreezing the ball for the
last ninety seconds. It took the
winners the first half to get used
to a zone defense thrown around
them by ATO, but once they broke
it, the game was theirs.
In second place playoffs, Sigma
Nu and Phi Gamma Delta both
won their games to gain the right
to meet each other in the final.
Sigma Nu defeated Kappa Sigma,
40-14, and Theta Chi, lost to Phi
Gamma Delta, 62-24.
The Phi Gams jumped off to a
9-0 lead before Theta Chi broke
its own ice with a two-pointer.
From the start Phi Gamma Delta

could not be stopped and it rolled
to 31-13 advantage at the half-
way mark.
In the second half the Phi
Gams doubled their total and won
easily, 62-24. Walt Scherer and
Dave Haller led the winners with
17 points apiece.
Sigma Nu had little trouble in
downing its opponent, Kappa Sig-
ma. Ted Horn registered six of
Sigma Nu's first eight points as
he helped his team to a one-sided
40-14 win.
Closest Game
The closest game of the night
involved Tau Kappa Epsilon and
Acacia. The Tekes squeezed out
an 18-17 win, although they were
losing 10-8 at the half. They will
now face Delta Upsilon who
toppled Tau Delta Phi, 60-13, in
the third place final.
Other games saw Pi Lambda
Phi defeat Alpha Sigma Phi,
31-21, and the Seldom Seen Kids
down Chemistry, 55-21. Phi Sigma
Delta won its game by forfeit over
Psi Upsilon.

l
l
J
R

By The Associated Press
NCAA Second Round
The next phase of the NCAA
Basketball Tournament opens in
four cities tomorrow night with
the nation's top-ranked teams,
North Carolina, Kansas, Kentucky
and Southern Methodist; all booked
for action.
Unbeaten North Carolina and
Canisius, winners in first-round
games in Madison Square Garden
Tuesday night, clash in Philadel-
phia. Kentucky meets Pittsburgh

at Lexington, Ky.. and
faces SNM at ballas.

Royals on Block
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (A') --- Les
Harrison, general manager of the
Rochester Royals of the National
Basketball Association, said yes-
terday the Royals' franchise defi-
nitely was on the market.
Harrison, whose teams have won
three world championships and
five division titles in 12 years, said
the operation "blew about $30,000
this year."

Kansas

3

I

a

----

"I

NCAA Ruling Hits Icers

I
't

(Continued from Page 1)

the NCAA would abide by the deci-
sion handed down the Western
Conference.
Suspension Reduced
The Eligibility Committee of the
Western Conference ruled in Feb-
ruary, 1956, that Buchanan and
Maxwell "were in violation of Con-
ference regulations in that they
accepted expense money fir out-
side competition while still in high
school and, therefore, are ineligi-
ble for further intercollegiate com-
petition."
Later, the suspension wvas re-
duced by the Conference to one
year.
The pair sat out the last two
semesters and were reinstated by
the Conference at the beginning
of the current semester. It now
develops that Conference rulings
on matters of eligibility and NCAA
rulings are two separate matters.
Loss Hurts
The loss of Maxwell will be felt
by the Wolverines in their title

defense. Buchanan sustained a
knee injury shortly after his return
to action last month and was not
expected to play in the tournament
anyway, due to the injury.
Maxwell, however, will be hard
to replace. Heyliger expected to
move Jerry Karpinka up from the
third to the first line to replace
Maxwell, who had scored 10 goals
in the 10 games he played this
year.
CHeyliger said that the team
greeted the decision withe"mixed
emotions" and that they felt Max-
well and Buchanan had received a
"raw deal."
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