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March 10, 1957 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAGE EIGHTT TBI CHIGAN nAIT.

7

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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 157

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PMo0r COMM UvCA TIONS:
Candidates Camp aign in Person in India

By EUGENE LEVIN
NEW DELHI (P) -- By bullock
cart, airplane and foot, hundreds
of politicians are whistle-stopping
around India in their campaign for
votes in the world's biggest free
election.
They have no television to help
them reach the voters. The radio
and the press have limitations. The
candidates must campaign in per-
son, or not at all.
In this and many other ways
the campaign for the Indian gen-
eral election differs from Western
ballot battles.
Since India has a parliamentary
system, there is no nationwide con-
test. All the campaigns are in local
districts, with the voters picking
new representatives for the lower
house of Parliament and for the
state legislatures. So it's no trouble
for candidates to meet the voters.
However, Prime Minister Jawa-
harlal Nehru and other top mem-
bers of his Congress party are
making nationwide appeals to the
voters to back all Congress candi-
dates. Communists, Socialists and
other parties are doing the same.
The candidates are not using
television because there is no tele-
vision. They are not using the
radio because it is government con-
trolled, and the radio officials have
ruled against allowing any time for
campaign speeches.
Each political party has the
right to ask the government radio
to broadcast a 10-minute policy
statement, But the statement must
be read by a regular announcer,
and it is broadcast only once.
OrganizationI
Notices

Candidates cannot depend on
the press too much, for Indian
dailies have a circulation of barely
three million in a country of 360
million. This is 1Lrgely because of
the high illiteracy rate.
The opposition candidates have
another handicap in the press.
India truly has a "one-party press'
-for Nehru's Congress party. It
is almost impossible to find a
daily newspaper opposing the Con-
gress party.

The few that do, handle their
criticism carefully and usually
back Nehru, while opposing his
party. Almost anything Nehru says
gets headlines. Statements by Com-
munists, Socialists or Rightists are
often printed inside.
With India's high illiteracy rate,
the government has taken special
steps to make sure that the voters
know how to make the best of the
election.
The balloting itself is made sim-
ple' Each party has been given a

symbol. For the Congress it is a
pair of yoked bullocks. For the
Communists it is the crossed sickle
and hammer. Each polling booth
will have a ballot box for each
party, and on each ballot box will
be the party's name and symbol.
When a voter steps into the
booth with his ballot, he will not
mark the ballot. Instead, he will
put it in the box of the party he
favors. It's a simple system that,
in India, is far superior to the
voting machine.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
For additional information and ap-
pointments, contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3528 Administration Build-
ing, NO. 3-1511, Ext. 489.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
The Vick Chemical Corp. will inter-
view on Tues., March 18 for college
juniors interested in working in any
of the following fields: advertising,
sales, merchandising, production, engr.
scientific research and development, ac-
counting, and financial mgt. The can-
didates will wok for the various di-

visions of the company in various lo-
cations. Call the Bureau of Appoint-
ments for an appointment, ext. 3371.
The following will be present at the
Michigan Union on Wed., March 13
in Room 3G from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Joe Kruger of Camp Mah-Kee-Nac
in Lenox, Mass., will interview for male
counselors in the following fields: ca-
noeing, boating, sailing, swimming, wa-
ter skiing, pioneering, music and dra-
ma, waterfront, archery, tennis, and
a National Riflery Association instruc-
tor or probationary instructor.
Mrs. Meta Riseman of the Riseman
Farm Camp will interview nurses, wat-
erfront directors and general counsel-
ors. The Riseman Farm Camp is in Dry-
den, Michigan.
Miss Janet Hays of the Jackson Coun-
ty Girl Scouts will be present from I
p.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Harry Collins of the Camp Hiawatha
in Comins, Michigan will interview wa-
terfront, riding and cabin counselors,
The Ann Arbor YMCA and YWCA

will be present in the afternoon.
Ronald Thompson will interview
counselors interested in working at a
day camp in Ann Arbor from 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m.
The Vanderbilt Tours are looking
for men to serve as tour escorts dur-
ing the summer, as well as office help

and stenographers. The central office
is in Chicago. Tours cover all of the
United States, parts of Canada and
Mexico. Information is available at
the Summer Placement Meeting, Wed-
nesday.. Mardh 13th. Do not call or
come to the Bureau for information.
Room 3G of the Union.

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Industrial Relations Club, March 11,
7:30 p.m., 141 Bus. Ad., Speaker, Gabriel
Alexander, "Violence at Southern Bell
Telephone." Refreshments and discus-
sion on this dispute which Mr. Alex-
ander handled.
Unitarian Student Group, panel,
March 10, 7:30 p.m., 1st Unitarian
Church. Topic: "What it means to be
religious."
s . "
Westminster Student Fellowship,
March 10, 5:30 p.m., Social Hall. i
Gamma Delta Lutheran Studentr-
O-ganization, supper-progam meeting,
March 10, 6:00 p.m., University Luther-
an Chapel. Speaker: Rev. Don Ortner,
"Creeds of Christendom."
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Dr.
T. Christie Innes, March 10, 4:00 p.m.,
Lane Hall. Topic. Topic: "Sin, Myth or
Master.":
* * *
Russian Circle, March 11, 8 p.m.,
Professor Lobanov will speak, Inter-
national Center.
*, * 4
MENC, Student Chapter, Jazz Con-
cert, March 10, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m., League.
Deutscher Verein, slides of Nazi and
present-day Germany, March 12, 7:30
p.m., Union room 3G.
4, * *
Lutheran Student Association, sup-
per and speaker on the Christian Sci-
entist Denomination, March 10, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Student Center.
University of Michigan Folk Dancers
a program of round and line dances,
March 11, 7:30 - 10:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
Graduate Outing Club, March 10, 2
p.m., Rackha.m. Hiking and Supper.
The Congregational and Disciples
Student Guild, March 10, 7:00 p.m.,
Memorial Christian Church. Rev, and
Mrs. Russell - Fuller, "Marriage and
Home-building."
Pro-Mexico Group
To Honor Niehuss
Vice-President Marvin L. Nie-
huss will be recognized Tuesday
for his work in developing greater
understanding and friendship be-
tween the peoples of the United
States and Mexico.

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IN THE LOWER LEVEL
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