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March 10, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-03-10

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SUNDAY, MARCH 10,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TTMRR

SUNDAY, MARCH tO, 1957 THE MICHIGAN I) mv 1'AE~1~ rrmu'u

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INTEGRATION:
'U' Emphasizes
Frosh Adjustment
Si

Flu Hits 380 Students
At Slauson Junior High

IFC Helps'Y' Fund Drive
For Combined Facilities

U

LOVE THAT BOOKSHOP
-Bob Marshall's

(Continued from Page 1)
to request mixed living, although
this question permits it if they
wish," Dean Fuller remarked.
"Frequently," she added, "they
will do just the opposite."
Disregard Religion
Unless women request it, no at-
tention is given to religious faith
in assignment; this has led, ac-
cording to Dean Fuller, "to some
mixture of religions."
Some racial and national mix-
ing of women has evidently oc-
curred, at least in part from the
doubling-up, but these character-
istics still seem to be considered
more important than religion.
There is a basic difference in
the men's system.
Usually Reject Mixing
In addition to languages spoken
in the home and religious prefer-
ence, they are asked, "Are you in-
terested in a roommate of a na-
tionality or race other than
your own?" which administrators
claim is usually answered "no".
Administrators claim the res-
ponsibility of integration infre-
quently arises because the "Are
you interested . . . ?" question is
usually answered "no."
But one person pointed out that
this is true only with race and na-
tionality, since the question does
not refer to religion.
Men More Reluctant
Administrators in the men's sys-
tem appear more reluctant to mix
religions than those in the wo-
men's. Again the Jewish tendency
to go together has some influence,
administrators claim.
Some officials said they do not
hesitate to mix Catholics and
Protestants.
Arms Expert
To Give Talk
Military analyst of The New
York Times, Hanson Baldwin will
lecture 8:30 p.m. Tuesday on
"Where Do We Go From Here?"
The program is part of the Uni-
versity Lecture Course.
Recognized as one of the out-
* standing civilian authorities on
military affairs, Baldwin is con-
sidered one of the most brilliant
columnists of our times.
During World War II, he cov-
ered most of the battle areas from
the South Pacific to North Africa,
England and France.
Baldwin has covered almost ev-
ery important military maneuver
and has made cross-country tours
of military posts since the war.

Assignment of new men is done
in each house b -theAssociate Ad-
viser beginning about May 1 and
continuing until school ends when
most advisers leave for the sum-
mer.
The Office of Student Affairs
handles late applications and can-
cellations, with most of the work
being done,by Streiff.
Job Quite Difficult
From 20 to 25 per cent of the
new men are assigned here. Sen-
ior Quadrangle Director John Hale
said a lack of time plus limited
space in the dorms makes OSA's
job "quite difficult."
"Roorpmate conflict frequently
comes from students placed dur-
ing the summer by OSA," he
added.
In both systems, administrators
report foreign students frequently
request American roommates.
Race, religion and nationality
are the controversial issues in as-
signment, but administrators point
out that many other considera-
tions are necessary to get com-
patible roommates.
Other Considerations
With a woman the first consid-
eration is getting her in the house
she wants.
Among both men and women,
most roommate conflict is caused
by smoking, w:indows open or clos-
ed at night, study habits and tem-
perament, according to adminis-
trators. Most report giving con-
sideration to these items before
race, religion or nationality.
Some observers have seen in the
crowding of women and the pos-
sible crowding of men, more forced
integration.
They point out that in assigning
three and four people to a room it
will be much more difficult to get
"similar roommates."

Slauson' Junior High School's
halls were emptier than usual Fri-
day after a flu-type virus affected
380 pupils by the end of the day.
The specific virus remained uni-
dentified, according to a County
Health Department official.
Sore throats, body weakness and
high temperatures affected the pu-
pils, who represent more than a
third of the school's 988 students.
The illness struck Thursday,
when 180 students were kept home
and another 120 were sent home
during the day.
Health Department laboratory
McDonald
'Cals hreat
Non-A merican
Kenneth H. McDonald, city Re-
publican chairman, declared yes-
terday, "Strong arm tactics,
threats and brute force do not be-
long in our American system or our
Ann Arbor campaign."~
He commented on the anony-
mous telephone threat made to
Republican Councilman Norman
J. Randall, Thursday.
The Republican chairman found
"it difficult to believe that this
cowardly threat could be inspired,
directed or conaoned by the leader-
ship of the Democratic party."
McDonald explained Randall was
a party leader and was, in a sense,
a speaker for the party. And when
he is attacked or threatened, this
is not only aimed at the entire Re-
publican party, but "also our
American political system."
Randall, who is not running for
re-election, had commented in the
press on issues raised in the local
political contest.

tests decided yesterday that a bac-
terial infectiont ould beruled out
following throat culture tests ta-
ken Thursday.
Health officials "didn't find any-
thing they are concerned about."
Basing her statement on a
Health Department report that a'
series of flu-type virus infections
have been noticed in the city late-
ly, Dr. Theresa Woo, director of
health services of the city's public
schools, suggested the mass illness
might have been caused by 24 to
48-hour virus infections.
The Health Department official
said yesterday his department does
not have the equipment to properly
diagnose viruses. "A virus is so
hard to get a culture of that it is
difficult to tie down."
Principal Harold Logan of the
Slauson School said he had in-
structed teachers to carefully ob-
serve students in their classes, and
to send them home if they ap-
peared ill.
Dr. Otto K. Englke, Health De-
partment director, has been out of
the city during the epidemic. He is
expected to return today.

New combined YM-YMCA facil-
ities are in the offing for Ann Ar-
bor, partially through assistance
of Inter-fraternity Council.
IFC recently offered its help in a
citywide campaign for funds to
construct a new building serving'
the needs of both the local YM and
YWCA.
Under the direction of Prof.
Wesley VanMalsen, of the naval
science department, volunteers
from the fraternity system con-
tacted University personnel and
collected more than $1200 for the
fund.
The volunteers were divided into
five groups under the leadership of
Ed Shannon, '58 BAd, Dick Rear-
ick, '57, Fred Trost, '57, Bob
Creal, '58 BAd, and Harvey Weiss,
'58.
Local YM-YWCA leaders sur-
passed their $1,000,000 goal dur-
ing the two weeks of the drive,
Prof. V a n M a l s e n said. "I feel
it's a real credit to them they
were able to raise so much money
in such a short time."
The new building is to be built
on the site of the present YWCA

on Fifth Ave. Construction should
begin within a year, Prof. Van
Malsen said.
Present plans call for construc-
tion of joint recreational facili-
ties, includng a swimming pool
and gyn masium.

4

I

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firl
GENERAL
fiAOTORS

LOBSTER DINNER
$3.50 per person 0
Fresh Jumbo Shrimp
0_or
Fruit Compote
o .Clam Chowder
9 WHOLE BROILED
LIVE LOBSTER
-o Drawn Butter
Fresh Vegetables Julienne Potatoes
Dinner Rolls and Butter
Chef's Green Salad Bowl
Choice of Dessert Choice of Beverage
Com.limentary Dinner on Birthday
HOTEL ALLEN EL
(Under personal direction of Ray Coppa)

Coming OnCampus
FRIDAY, MARCH 15
Delco Radio Division of General Motors announces
campus interviews for men and women with degrees
(BS, MS, and PhD) in Electrical Engineering Me-
chanical Engineering, Metallurgy, Physical Chemistry,
Physics and Production Engineering.
Delco Radio for years has bee-n the world's leader
in automobile radios and now produces the highest
power transistors available today. Delco Radio is an
electronics engineering, research, and manufacturing
organization where in permanent jobs you will work
with outstanding scientists and engineers.
Arrange an interview through your Placement
Office.

.1

i 1

DIVISION OF
GENERAL MOTORS
KOKOMO, INDIANA

- '.-.--.-
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,;
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t._.:.:
+:
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$ X.
x

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Leader in Electronics and Semiconductors *

ii

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Y

EATON'S FINE PAPER

AiResearch let pump "shoots air bullets"
to increase efficiency of
refrigeration units

NO 3-2481

MORRI L'S

314 S. State

0 0

0

0

GENERAL
MOTORS

JU NE

GRADUATES

T eGarrett Corporation com-
prises one of the most unique and
diverse research, engineering
and manufacturing organizations
in the world.
The parent company, founded
in 1936, has grown from three per-
sons to nearly 10,000 scientists
engineers and production specialists.
From the AiResearch laboratories
have come the pioneer developments
in aircraft components and systems
which have pushed back the barriers of
speed and altitude. Today, 90 per cent of
the free world's aircraft carry this equipment.
Divisions and subsidiaries are also engaged in
zreating industrial products in such varied fields as
marine equipment and, turbochargers for diesels, and
in supplying sales and installation engineering services to
airframe companies, airlines and the military.
Through foreign licensees, Garrett's products and
engineering services now circle the globe.

A General Motors Representative
will be on hand to answer your questions
about job opportunities with GM
MARCH 11 ... MARCH 12 ... MARCH 13 ... MARCH 15

Garrett's growth has been rapid and its position sound
and stable, mainly because of the creative ability and ideas
of its engineers.

Our College Representatives speak for
all of our many decentralized divisions'
throughout the country.
They are familiar with career opportuni-
ties throughout the entire organization,
including staff and divisional operations,

and can answer your questions fully.
We cordially invite June graduates, and
those graduating this summer, to arrange
an appointment through your College
Placement Office on one of the above
listed dates.

JOB OPPlRTUNETEES

* THE

GM Positions Now Available in:
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING MECHANICAL ENGINEERi:
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING " CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING " INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
CHEMISTRY * PHYSICS * CERAMICS
MATHEMATICS AND ACCOUNTING
Undergraduates:
The General Motors Representative will be back in the Spring to
interview Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors, who plan to take
. o , :n r-a w.mnn fr mm. O m n. fit, +- minn + CwN Tf +nli+ nr. i

Engine Development
Thermodynamics
Aerodynamics
Missile Accessories
Specifications
Combustion Analysis
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Instrumentation
Gas Turbines
Stress-Vibration
Technical Writing
Preliminary Design

Drawing Checking
Engineering Analysis
Gear Engineers
Vibration Engineers
Gear Designers
Design and Detail Drafting
Laboratory Technician
Sales Engineering
Installation Engineering
Liquid Oxygen
Air Turbines
Air and Freon Centrifugal
Compressors

Mathematics
Air Data Systems
Electrical Engineering
Transistor Mag-Amps
Instrument Design
Communication Equipment
Electronics
Analogue Computers
Cycle Analysts
Control Engineers
Computer Programming

CORPORATION
9851 S. SEPULVEDA BLVD.
.OS ANGELES 45, CAULFORNIA
DIVISIONS
AiRESEARCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY
LOs ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
AERO ENGINEERING DivISIoN
MINEOLA, LONG ISLAND, N.Y
AIRESEARCH MANUFACTURING COMPANY
OF ARIZONA
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
AlRESEARCH INDUSTRIAL DIVISION
Los ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
AIRSUPPLY DIVISION

TYPICAL PROJECT ACIVITIES

Gas turbine auxiliary pneumatic and electric
nower units.

various types of missiles.
iet engine and rotatino machinerv desi-nn and

I

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