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February 07, 1957 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-07
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thu sdayl FaIbru ,rv,7. 195'7

Thursdoy February7 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

............_......______________......UT__ * Y !*" 17J.1

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Hollywood Infiltration

THE THREE MUSKETEERS'
.a scene from the MGM film (See Story, Page 13)

fri., sat., sun.
8:15
no 2-5915
clifford odet's broadway and
hollywood success

3

CONTENTS
NORTHERN MICHIGAN -A contrast between
the busy life of a resort city and the silent life
of a hidden bog. Page 3.
PUNCH MAGAZINE - An editorial revolution
has achieved a striking change from 'stodgy'
to casual humor in this famed British journal.
Page 4.,
THE CONVERSATIONAL LOOK - A penetrat-
ing analysis of the collegiate appearance that
has burst in to a new 'way of looking.' Page 5.
WARREN'S 'NEW ENGLAND SAINTS'- Our
reviewers present two opposing views of this
recently published literary work. Page 8.
THE POLITICAL SCENE - Political science
courses naively ignore the dirtier aspects of
politics our writer finds, as he examines the
varied channels of political corruption. Page
10.
A FINNISH JOURNEY - Traveling in the 'pine-
wrapped corner of the earth' proved more ex-
citing than Mr. West anticipated. Page 11.
THE MUSIC REVIEWER - Our 'reviewer of
reviewers' lists the criteria necessary to mak-
ing sound musical judgments. Page 12.
HOLLYWOOD INFILTRATION - The long-
standing enemy of television has been proving
that old movies can attain greater popularity
than many 'live' TV shows, a distressing situ-
ation to dozens of producers. Page 13.
'THE KING AND I'-Despite its glowing per-
formances and lively color, it is nothing more
than a filmed stage production. Page 14.
A TRIBUTE TO THE STATE -The 'Michigan'
has played significant parts in an assassina-
tion, the training of World War 1I troops and
done a great deal of peacetime work. Page 15.
TELEVISION ADVANCEMENTS - They prob-
ably will be more technical than artistic; the
form will definitely improve, but the content
may remain the same. Page 16.
ARTURO TOSCAN IN I-He corrected the abuses
tradition had led music into, while carrying
on a never-ending search for perfection in all
he did. Page 18.
EDUCATION - 'As many avenues of satisfac-
tion as possible' is recommended by Prof. Cut-
ler who works on the assumption that'.. .ideas
can be fun.' Page 21.
SUPPLEMENT EDITOR-Ernest Theodossin
SUPPLEMENT PHOTOGRAPHERS-Edward Graff, David Arnold
PICTURE CREDITS-Page2: Courtesy Metro Goldwyn Myer; Page 4:
Daily photograph by Edward Graff; Pages 5, 6, 7: Daily photo-
graphs by David Arnold; Page 8: Daily photograph by Edward
Graff; Page 10: Daily photograph by Hall Leeds; Page 11:
photographs courtesy Boersma Travel Service; Page 12: op photo-
graph courtesy Spencer Photographers, Milstein, Rubenstein cour-
tesy Choral Union Society; Page 13: 'The Farmer's Daughter'
courtesy RKO Studios, 'Adam Had Four Sons' courtesy Screen Gems,
Inc., all others courtesy Metro Goldwyn Mayer; Page 15, 17: of-
ficial photographs, U.S. Navy; Page 18: Associated Press Photo;
Page 21: Daily photograph by David Arnold.

NATIVE OF THE SOIL
... the scientist's dream world

'EASY TERMS':
NORTHERN
MICHIGAN

PUNCH MAGAZINE:
Change: Cover and

Subscribe
to the
Michigan
Daily

(Continued from Page 4)
but short articles often treating
the British way of life as a com-
edy. New Yorker, of course, is well
known for its stories by often
well-known or well-known-to-be
authors.
Both magazines use the short
quotation from a newspaper, fol-
lowed by a snappy comment, to
fill small spaces at the bottoms of
their pages.
Cartoons .".
THE strongest resemblances be-
tween the two magazines are
in their sizes and the presence of
literary, theatrical, film and tele-
vision criticism in each of them.
Even more important are the
cartoons, by which both magazines
are best known.
Domestic, political and topical
matters are caught weekly by
Punch and New Yorker cartoon-
ists.
The results are similar-often
too similar, as a recent issue of
Time pointed out, illustrating a
striking difference in subject mat-
ter between two cartoons, one ap-
pearing in 'Ihe New Yorker within
months after its counterpart ap-
peared in Punch.
Punch cartoons occasionally
present trouble to the non-British
oriented American unfamiliar with
his language-brothers' ways and
means.
Butthe majority of cartoons-
like the one of the two undertakers
sitting on a stone bench in the
cemetery reading a copy of Life--
are easily understandable in this
country.
As Britishers will agree, Punch
has been known and read best for
its cartoons. In former years, the
"political bite" of the magazine
had its prominence in Great Bri-
tain.
Revolution . ..
ACTUALLY, the Punch of today
is the result of a revolution
that may still be going on.
Collegiate Hairstyling
To Please . .
@11 HAIRCUTTERS
*NO WAITING
-Tonsorial Queries Invited-
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

This revolution began with the
naming of Malcom Muggeridge as
editor of the humor magazine
within the last few years.
Prior to the appointment of the
new editor, Punch appeared week-
ly with the same cover-a red and
cream colored drawing of a beak-
nosed, hump-backed little man in
the clothes of a jester, sitting at
his desk with a dog in hat and
cloth collar.
They are surrounded by a mul-
titude of allegorical characters
floating up and down the sides
and across the top and bottom of
the cover, with the magazine's
name spelled out in misshapen
twigs at the top of the cover.
This was the traditidial cover
of Punch. It was changed on a
great occasion or a special issue
by altering the positions and the
actions of the figures.
Several years ago, the quarterly
seasional numbers of Punch took
on an entirely different, full-color
cover that depicted the little man
and his dog in an entirely different
setting doing somewhat different
things.
Today's Punch covers are of the
latter type, even occasionally
omitting the man and his dog al-
together.
New Aroma . .
THE insides of Punch, according
to Britishers familiar with the
magazine in the past, have also
been added to and given a more
interesting aroma.
The latter-day revolution, Brit-
ishers say, is aimed at regaining
the readers Punch lost when it

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ann arbor's professional arena theatre
masonic temple 327 s. 4th ave.

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SING! ACT!1 DANCE!
PRODUCTION * PUBLICITY * ORCHESTRATION * ACCOMPANIST
in
"PRINCESS IDA"
SPRING SHOW OF THE
U OF M /6eit & fd'h SOCIETY
Organizational .i.umi"ce. 8:00 in the League
Meeting HUr1., Feb. 7 (Call 2-8453 if you can't come)

(Continued from Page 3)
7CpE TRENDis not limited to
the peripheries of towns; the
Lake Michigan shore beyond
Mackinac City is sparsely settled
- pleasantly so. Suddenly reality
hits like a slap in the face, nego-
tiate a curve and ... "LOW DOWN
PAYMENT!" "EASY TERMS!",
and there are three small, square
bungalows. They are completely
alike-except, one is pink, another
yellow, and the third, blue.
Beyond, Into Wilderness Park
and Waugoshance Point, there is
a return to the serenity of an emp-
ty, open area. Michigan simply
disappears - through a series of
marshes and sandy beaches -
Into the Lake. Gulls, terns, and
sandpipers congregate by the
hundreds, and the arrogant Great
Blue Heron can be seen perched
atop, a sapling barely strong
enough to hold him.
Inland from the point - In
the huge Red Pines a unique sight
can be had - a majestic living
picture of our national emblem,
the Bald Eagle. He perches high
on a dead branch - his dark
brown body silhouetted against the
sky and outlined by his brilliant
white crown and tail.
Further down the Lake Michi-
gan shore is Cross Village, the
"Indian" center of Northern Mich-
igan. "The Indians make these,"
say the wide-eyed, innocent nine-
year-olds behind the counter
getting practical training in the
art of business dealings. (The
baskets, when surreptitiously over-
turned usually say, "Made in Mex-
ico," or "Made in Japan.")
THE INDIAN is there, but the
average tourist does not see
him. He farms his land, and stays
away from the night spots of the
tourist. His Saturday nights con-
sist of a trip to the local tavern
where he meets his friends to play
pool or shuffleboard. His wife has
a baby in her arms and his teen-

age children dance to a few of the
two dozen polkas on the juke box.
Quantities of beer- are consumed
and there is much laughter. He has
no concept of his antithesis, the
resorter sitting at the bar five miles
distant-drinking stronger liquor,
and thinking about what a "good
time" he is having making small
talk.
These are the surface contrasts.
rhe vital, pulsating one remains
intangible: It cannot be seen in
the resort towns or on the still,
silent beaches. But the realization
af man's mechanistic encroach-
ment upon the expanse of water-
ways and second growth forest is
one that is felt by degrees. The
prick that begins the process is
seeing the mammoth Mackinac
bridge structure. The longest sin-
gle span in the world will link the
Upper and Lower Peninsulas of
Michigan. But what will be the
effect of the St. Lawrence Seaway
on this small area at the focal
point of Canadian ore, Midwestern
manufactured products and for-
eign goods shipments? How inter-
esting it will be to watch the meta-
morphosis.

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BOARD IN CO-OPS
$8.75 Per Week - Three Meals a Day

SENTIMENTAL SET$
Groom's ring $35.00

Bride's ring

$32.50

Rings Enlarged to Show Detail
Prices incl. Fed. Tax. *Trad* Marks Reg.
tC Yhed

.. HARVEST SET $02
~.-Groom's ring $32.50
Bride's ring $24.50
Foremost in style, expertly crafted in
surance of the finest. Let us show you
our great selection.for Over 100 Years
As advertised
1 In LIFE and LOOK

At the following addresses -
FOR MEN AND WOMEN:
Mark VIII Co-op, 917 S. Forest
Stevens Co-op, 816 S. Forest
FOR MEN ONLY:
Michigan Co-op, 315 N. State
Nakamura Co-op, 807 S. State
FOR INFORMATION Call Luther Buchele
1 :00 to 5:00 P.M., NO 8-6872

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SAFFEL

201 South Main at Washington

NTER-COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
1017 Oakland

On State
FOR OVER A QUAR

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