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February 26, 1957 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-26

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PAGE six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 29,1957

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26,1957

rack

Hi c key

Hopes

Lifted

Miehigan Smashes Illinois;
Conierence Hopes Raised

PRE-ELECTRIC
SHAVE LOTION

By BOB BOLTON
Michigan track coach Don Can-I
ham was wrong again.
All last week Canham was cry-
ing the blues as Saturday's meet
with a rough Illinois team drew
near.
Visitors to Canham's office last
week .might haN o thought they
were attending a wake.
"Oh, it will be close," he said
"but I don't see how we can beat
them. With their depth they
should take us by about three
points. With any luck at all they
could take every first place in the
show . . . except, of course, the
shot put."
Looking at the Illini on paper
prior to Saturday afternoon's
meet at Yost Field House, it
looked as though Canham, even
taking into account his usual pre-
meet pessimism, might be right.
Illinois certainly did look impres-
sive.
They boasted strength in the
dashes, the distances, the broad
jump, the high jump and the
hurdles.
Unfortunately for the Illini,
their strength remained on paper
and never materialized and the
Wolverines won a stunning 73-41
victory.

The win kept intact a dual-
meet winning streak that has now
reached 19 and it heightened
greatly the trackmen's hopes for
the Big Ten finals, to be held Fri-
day and Saturday at Columbus.
Assistant Coach Elmer Swan-
son explained the Michigan vic-
tory this way. "We know what
our boys can do, but Illinois never
showed us what they are really
capable of doing. They have a 24'
broad-jumper (Bob Mitchell) who
didn't even do 21'. They also have
a two-mile man (Karl Johnson)
who placed in the NCAA final as
a sophomore and didn't win Sat-
urday."
Mamon Gibson turned in a
"best-so-far" effort of 13'6%" in
the pole vault to tie for first place
with Illinois' Jerry Stanners.
Jan Carlsson and Brendan
O'Reilly, who also took first in the
high jump, grabbed a very unex-
pected 1-2 finish in the high
hurdles. Carlsson, the winner, fin-
ished in the comparatively slow
time of :08.6.
In the shot put, Dave Owen
lobbed the 16-lb. ball 55'9%" in
his only try of the aftelnoon to
grab off his usual first place, then
hurried off to catch a plane for
New York, where he competed in
the National AAU at Madison
Square Garden Saturday night.

Icers Take
Two More
From MSU
By SI COLEMAN
With the chips stacked against
them, the Michigan hockey team
came through in fine style and
swept the weekend series from its
arch rival, Michigan State, by the
scores of 5-4 and 2-1.
Rough Action Featured
Both games, Friday night at
East Lansing, and Saturday night
at home in Ann Arbor, were
characterized by stiff body check-
ing, frequent flare-ups cf tempers
and spectacular play by both
teamr' goal-tenders.
The Wolverines' Ross Childs
and the Spartans' Joe Selinger
were particularly brilliant on Sat-
urday. At one point Selinger
made five saves consecutively
while lying on the ice.
Childs made innumerable
checks and he did ,not even see
the single goal scored against him,
a 15-ft. screen shot.
Hustle Keynote
Hustle seemed to be the key-
note for Michigan, and Dick Dun-
nigan particularly was a prime
example of this. His constant
pressure finally paid off in the
third period when he stick-
handled through the State de-

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WIHL STANDINGS

A Champion Returns
THE TALK of the tennis world these days is Michigan's Barry Mac-
Kay, newly-crowned national indoor doubles champion and semi-
finalist in the national indoor singles championship held in New York
City.
MacKay's recent surge of upsets has added a completely new tone
to his whole tennis world. Suddenly he has neared the level of perform- .
ance that has been hoped for by United States tennis officials for quite
some time. He is again a strong Davis Cup contender.
Over the past two weekends, Barry has added an impressive list
of victims-Dick Savitt, Vic Seixas and Ulf Schmidt in singles and
doubles combinations of Schmidt-Seixas and Savitt-Bill Talbert.
The big singles victory came last
Thursday night against defending
champion Schmidt, 8-6, 1-6, 6-3.
The second-round match was a
close one with MacKay finally;' N
able to pour it on in the third set.
The next night Barry played sin ;
gles against his doubles partner, f
Grant Golden, a former Big Ten
champion from Northwestern and
j 10th ranked player' in the coun-
try. (MacKay is rated 26th.)
Although Golden was in top
form, Michigan's lanky econom-
ics major won 6-3, 8-6, and
earned the right to meet veteran
Herb Flam in the semi-final the
next day.
MacKay admits that he was _. .:
bothered slightly by a sore arm
.
and a pulled knee muscle, but ob
servers commented that Flam i.: w. . .... .,
played one of his best indoor BARRY MacKAY
games anyway to beat MacKay great promise
soundly, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Elam was
beaten in the finals by Kurt Nielson of Denmark.
In the doubles, Golden and MacKay pulled the major upsets of
the tournament by sweeping by the two top-seeded combinations.
The first big upset came with an I1-9, 6-0, 3-6, 6-3 victory. The
finals brought another impressive win over second-seeded Savitt and
Talbert in four sets, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
What caused the big turnabout? MacKay himself isn't exactly
sure, but he attributes his recent successes in part to a freshness after
playing regularly all summer. Another factor is the matter of con-
fidence as developed when one pulls a big upset. Also, MacKay has
improved his serve, which, he admits, helps his indoor play. The speed
and bounce of the ball on wooden courts seem to his advantage.
New Davis Cup Member .. .
DURING the tournament, the new preliminary six-man Davis Cup
team was announced. The trend of this past summer's "youth
movement" is noticeable again with only two veterans on the roster--
Seixas and Ham Richardson. The other four are MacKay, Mike Green,
Mike Franks, and Sam Giammaiva. ° At present, MacKay is the red-
hottest of them all, but he's taking a tennis break until April when he
probably will hit part of the tournament trail again.
SINCLARIZE %YOU R CAR
FOR N"VINTER N'O'%V"V of 1

THE

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Men in the know
, know true from false

C:: ;. > :

It costs more than $5,000 to
send the average student
through college
STRUE FALSE
True. Schools and individual in-
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national average cost is estimated
at nearly $6,000.

G,
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Most college men belong
to fraternities
TRUE FALSE
False. Many schools don't permit
fraternities, and at major state uni-
versities, there are always more inde-
pendents than fraternity men. Fra-
ternities are, however, at an all-time
high in membership.

PAUL REED'S SERVICE
"Dealer in Si NCLAI R Products"
NO 2-7840 716 Packard at State NO 8-9587
ar a .ter a w "M are.. mm am* s mm- «... +r ....... wm a arr w aar

Have you-solved this problem? i

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where there is greater diversification and continuous pAInned expansion."

N.:.:.

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Jockey brand is America's
best known brand of
men's underwear
E TRUE 50FALSE
True. Independent surveys prove
that Jockey is not only the best
known underwear in the U.S.A. but
also in 75 other countries around
the world. Just shows how much
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The ink was barely dry on Ed Johnson's M.E. degree
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success story, and after just six years with the company it
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the production department, an administrative assistant.
From there, he moved on to shop foreman. In Ed's own
words . . . "I wouldn't trade the experience gained there
for anything, the most valuable in the world to me today."

Whatever your preferred field of engineering speciali-
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at Emerson. Commercially, since 1890, Emerson has been
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a leader nationally since 1940, designs, develops, and manu-
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Find out how you can get in on the ground floor of this
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Firm job offers can be mode. If it's impossible for you to
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ENGINEERS . . . A.E., C.E., E.E., M.E.,
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
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As a soon-to-graduate engineer you have a tough prob-
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We would like to offer you some sound advice. First,
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you and the company you choose will prove a prime
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.S
.:

,--

NOW,
11

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S'TORE

HOURS DAILY 9

TO 5 :30

1i

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