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February 24, 1957 - Image 14

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-24
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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 24, 1957

Sundav. Februarv

24. 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-. - JF ,I - - - . .--I,

Coffee at the

Union

FACULTY

ART

With the First Swing of the New Snack Bar's Aluminum and Glass
Doors, A New Individual Evolved

Vitality and a Fragmentary Effect Characterized Exh
At A Recent Art Showing

By DONNA HANSON
Daily Staff Writer
THE old Union cafeteria used to
be a quiet haven for eaters,
snackers, occasional studiers and
visiting grads who couldn't leave
the University without reminis-
cing over their initials carved in
table tops. Soon, however, along
with the increased enrollment,
there was an increase in eaters
and visiting grads so the Union
expanded its cafeteria facilities by
adding an ultra-modern type snack
bar and cafeteria.
With the first swing of the new
snack bar's aluminum and glass
doors, a new type of campus in-
dividual evolved who can be am-
biguously labeled the "Union-
goer."
Some identifying characteristics
of the Union-goer are an ostenta-
tious display of familiarity with
other Union-goers coupled with
the I-feel-right-at-home type
look. Also, the individual who en-
ters, frantically looks around the
room and dashes for an empty
booth' making a claim on it by
triumphantly tossing his coat in
the seat can immediately be
marked as a Union-goer of the
first rank.
OCCASIONALLY, however, a
Union-goer can be found who
is rather reticent.
Though the booths are coveted
for their suggestion of intimacy
and security, this retiring Union-
goer will circle the room only
once in his empty booth search,
then quietly submit to the inevi-
table - sitting in the middle of

Sitting in groups usually of
his own nationality, the foreign
student uses the cafeteria as a
place for discussion, hashing over
the news of the day or arguing
over the latest panel discussion.
COUPLES have made the snack
bar a favorite place for social-
ization and rendezvous. Between
classes coffee and after-movie
confections provide easy rationa-
lization for the couples Union-
goers to stop at the cafeteria,
To them, the cafeteria has be-
come the epitome of "collegiate-
ness." Every college and Univer-
sity has its campus hangout and
to go elsewhere for coffee or
snacks would not be less than
pure sacrilige.
The last Union-goer type indi-
vidual is the "lone wolf." He, or
she as the case may be, comes to
the Union to seek friendship and
companionship. He crowds in
booths with people of mere pass-
sing acquaintance, monopolizing
the conversation with glib -fa-
miliarity.
Once in a while, the lone wolf is
unable to find even a slight sc-
quaintance, so he must sit alone,
feigning studious endeavor or pre-
occupation with some deep
thought.
These types by no means en-
compass all the Union-goers who
inhabit the cafeteria or snack
bar. They are merely the most
obvious and best described, and,
as phenomenal as the idea may
seem, there are actually people
who go to the Union snack bar
and cafeteria to eat!

LONE WOLF LONELY
. . involved with deep thought
the snack bar at one of the small
tables.
The distasteful aspect of sit-
ting at a middle table is the per-
son is open to inspection from all
sides. It gives one somewhat of a
feeling of nakedness.
OTHER than regular attendance
in the snack bar and cafe-
teria, there really isn't any one
basic characteristic that can be
applied to all Union-goers. Their
purposes in frequenting are di-
verse, but usually easily recogniz-
able.
The Bohemian -Union-goer
comes to the cafeteria to flaunt
his unconformity to an audience
of conformists. Attired in the lat-

OBLIVIOUS TO CONVIVIALITY
... studier is Union-goer
est of Bohemian fashions, he will
sit for hours in a "booth" and
hold deeply significant and duly
intellectual conversations with
his compatriots.
Spurning the 26 campus 11-
braries, the studier comes to the
cafeteria to mull over loga-
rithms and theorems and has
the amazing ability to be oblivious
of surrounding conviviality. His
purpose? Who knows. He probably
wants his coffee. He drinks it, too.
EQUIPPED with furrowed-brow
expressions and poised pencils,
the organization member Union-
goer sits with his fellow members
making policy decisions of seem-

HEY, WHAT'S THIS?
.. . some Union goers actually eat
ingly vast importance. He must
appear properly involved with the
campus at large, accomplished by
a friendly hello and a acick wave
of the hand to a minimum of 25
passers-by.
The smartly-dressed organiza-
tion member is never without a
folio or reams of mimeographed
papers. If, however, the member
is important enough so he can
obviously try not to be obvious,
his lapel tomahawk is a sufficient
earmark.
Foreign students make up a
large segment of Union-goers. Os-
tensibly lacking the "rah rah"
characteristics of many of the
surrounding students, they pro-
vide a sober and sedate contrast.

N

By CAROL PRINS
Daily staff writer
"10 START a work, you must
let the paint dictate the first
brush movements; this original
action determines the subsequent
brush strokes on the canvas,"
young faculty artist J. E. L. Eld-
ridge insists.
Eldridge's paintings, plus those
of Louis Tavelli, Albert Mullen,
Albert Weber, Leonard Zamiska
and Jim Miller, were exhibited
February 4-18 at the Rackham
Galleries in a collection by De-
partment of Art faculty artists.
Weber's and Zamiska's works
are described by Eldridge as the
artist's interpretation of a static
tangible object or anecdote. Among
the works exhibited were "Bull-
fight" and "Nude with Lamp" by
Weber.
Currently popular "abstract im-
pressionism" typifies the work of
Albert Mullen and Louis Tavelli.
DRAWING
...by Louis Tavelli
"Vitality and a fragmentary ef-
fect are characteristics of these
two artists."
Mullen's chief subjects are cre-
ations of human anatomy while
Tavelli carries a forest-like theme
throughout his paintings. "Tavel-
li's paintings often look as though
they are being seen through a
thicket or heavy foilage," Eldridge
says.
TE VITALITY shown in the
works of Tavelli and Mullen
is carried over into the works of
Eldridge, himself, and Jim Miller.
"In my own paintings, I try to
bring out the theme of organic
rhythm and the converging of
e n e r g I e s, Eldridge explained,
pointing to a work called "Froth-
fu Grass." The work, employin
conveys a marine theme suggest-
ing wave and water movement.
Another painting entitled "Pen-
Insular Sediment" could describe
the movement of mud rising from
a river.
Eldridge emphasizes the inter-
relation of the arts in describing
the exhibits: painting is only a
visual form of poetry.
"It is important that pictures
have a tactile sense also," said the
young artist, upon encountering
a bright yellow work he created
from paint-soaked newspapers.
L IT2HOGRAPH WORKS w e r e
shown by Eldridge. He ex-
plained they were printed from a
lithographing stone reproducing
the original as many as thirty
times.
"These lithographs seem to me
very easy to interpret, I was quite
dismayed when someone com-
mented that this human head
was an excellent reproduction of
tbe skull of a lion.
"Even more discouraging than
this," Eldridge concludes, "are
the people who snicker at the
paintings,"

'Red Striped Dress

'The Warrior' by James Miller

'Conversation' b

TELL ME ABOUT PICASSO
.. .Bohemian-type flaunts unconformity

IT'S THE LATEST THING OUT
... couples find cafeteria epitome of 'collegiateness'

STUDIOUS ENDEAVOR
... by female Union-goer

MIXES DATES, STUDYING
. Union-goers sit in coveted booth

FOREIGN STUDENT UNION-GOERS
.. .discuss latest panel discussion

'Bullfight' by Albert Weber

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