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February 24, 1957 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-24
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sundav.February24.1957

Sunnv Febhruorv 24, 195i7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Patterns

CONTENTS
PARACHUTING-Fear and nausea characterize
man's reactions to an activity that was never
meant to be'. Page 3.
THE MUSIC LAYMAN - A review of Vincent
Sheean's new book, "First and Last Love."
Page 4.
THE ART OF COIN COLLECTING-An explan-
ation of and look at the fever that overcomes
these dilettantes. Page 5.
COFFEE AT THE UNION-From the day alumi-
num and formica took over, a new campus type
has been evolving. Page 6.
FACULTY ART - Our reporter visits a recent
showing of faculty creativity at Rackham.
Page 7.
I LIVE IN A DORM-A first-hand, eye-witness

account
as 'mass

of that modern phenomenon known
living.' Page 8.

PHOTOGRAPHER JOHN HIRTZEL CAPTURES A CAMPUS SCENE THAT IS USUALLY UNNOTICED

Read
Daily
Class ifieds

THE EMOTIONAL PROBLEM-Mental medicine
men are giving their advice to worried students
who pursue them with rare avidity. Page 9.
MODERN POETRY-Reviews of two new books
that promise to enliven the current literary
scene. Page 10.
SUPPLEMENT EDITOR-Ernest Theodossin
SUPPLEMENT PHOTOGRAPHERS-
Norman Jacobs, Charles Curtiss,
John Hirtzel and Richard Gaskill
PICTURE CREDITS-Page 1: top, Daily photo-
graph by Richard Gaskill; bottom, Daily photo-
graph by Norman Jacobs; Page 3: courtesy
United States Army; Page 6: Daily photographs
by Charles Curtiss; Page 7: Daily photographs
by Richard Gaskill; Page 9: courtesy fine arts
department; Page 11.

CHUTS..
(Continued from Page 3)
orients himself in relation to the
other troopers in the air, guiding
or "slipping" his chute away from
them by manipulating one or more
of the four heavy web "risers" ex-
tending from his body harness up
from the shoulders and connect-
ing with the 28 nylon lines in
turn fastened onto the silk can-
opy.
NOT UNTIL he is about 200 feet
above earth does the jumper
have any sensation of falling. His
only sense while in the air is
floating. As objects on the ground
Science:
Numismatics
(Continued from Page ,5)
in very limited quantities. The
unique position held by commem-
oratives in United States coinage
is due mainly to the fact these
coins are the only type of Ameri-
can money with real historical
significance.
This historical feature often
creates interest among people who
would have little interest in num
ismatics. Gold pieces are extremely
difficult to acquire because deal-
ers do not purchase gold coins on
a bullion basis and this has creat-
ed a market for only the very
finest gold coins.
ONCE A PERSON learns the
basic characteristics of a coin
he can easily judge its worth as
a collector's item. Some coins,
while worth little in themselves,
can be valuable as parts of a
complete collection. For example;
there are 89 Lincoln cents from
1909 to 1940, and while only 14
of these coins are worth consid-
erably more than face value, even
the common varieties are in de-
mand to complete the collection.
When less than one million
1931-S cents were struck, specu-
lators bought up this coin and
good specimens are now rarely
found in circulation. The 1931-S
is the last "rare' cent struck in
the Lincoln variety. Towards the
close of World War II the Phila-
delphia mint alone was turning
out over one billion cents a year.
Lately great interest has built
up in the collection of "proof
sets," a proof specimen from
penny to half-dollar, which can
be purchased from the Philadel-
phia mint for two and one half
times the face value. Proof sets
of 1936 sell for more than one
hundred dollars, and some 1950
sets have already been sold for
fifty to fifty-five dollars.

# It was more than a
quarter Century ago
that Saffell & Bush
originated the style
and quality of lead-

begin to take shape, however, and
become increasingly discernible in
size, the jumper realizes he is ap-
proaching the ground. It appears
to rush up to him.
Preparing to land, theatrooper
lets his legs go limp so that when
he hits, he will crumple up and
ease into the ground rather than
stiffly slamming into it. He also
reaches high up onto the four
risers and pulls himself up on them
to get maximum lift from the
chute at the moment of landing.
Landing from a parachute jump
has been compared with the ef-
fect of jumping from a second
story window, moving roughly
22 miles an hour. This may vary
depending upon the temperature,
moisture, and wind conditions but
only a -well-conditioned and well-
trained man can handle it without
out hurting himself.
The relief the paratrooper gets
when he hits the ground is mixed
with pure exultation that he made
it. All his nervous energy seems
drained out and the extreme
tenseness disappears. Here he first

MOORE, BOOTH:
Two Volumes
Of Poetry

notices the cotton dryness of his
mouth, his covering of sweat (no
matter how cold it may be) and
the urgent desire to urinate.
O NCE ON THE GROUND, the
trooper has one last action to
perform, "spilling" his chute. Only
on perfectly windless days, a rare
phenomenon for which the para-
trooper fervently prays, will the
parachute deflate of its own ac-
cord. Usually, it falls to the ground
but stays inflated like a huge
round sail. This can cause trouble
if the ground wind is strong
enough and the paratrooper not
sufficiently alert. A stiff breeze
will catch the silk, drag the sol-
dier across the ground, and can
be the source of either slight or
major injury.
Death has been known to re-
sult from dragging. In a light
wind, the chute can be spilled by
the trooper laying where he has
landed and hauling in on one of
the risers and a set of shrould
lines until he can grab some silk.
In a faster wind, he must scramb-

le to his feet and run around the
blown up canopy, turning it out
of the wind and dumping the air.
The paratrooper then rolls up
his chute, shoves it into a kit bag,
swings it over his shoulder and
trudges off the drop zone.
From thetie dhe stood in the
door of the aircraft until he spill-
ed his chute, less than two min-
utes have elapsed.
W HY DOES a man jump out of
airplanes? Paratroopers ask
this of themselves every time they
strap on a chute. But no one has
yet been able to satisfactorily
answer the question.
Men usually volunteer for air-
borne duty out of a sense of ad-
'venture, the attraction of the
glamour of an airborne unit, the
chance to be in an elite, volunteer
unit instead of a company of
draftees, and possibly to earn some
extra money. Paratroopers receive
additional pay, labelled "incen-
tive" pay by the Army, but refer-
red to as "hazard" or "jump" pay
by the troops.
This might explain why the
prospective trooper joins. But it
doesn't explain why he stays, once
having made a few jumps. One
reason is his training. Intensive
and highly disciplinary, parachute
training indoctrinates the soldier
not to think but to react when
jumping.

P
aler
pred
selv
inst
it C
this
brea
fide
abli
W
inna
mee
trol
thir
ing
a s
acco
D
will
jum
jum
an I
No
a n
he d
mus
Ir
'tuni
ture
para
cha
mas
and

ows," there are still grosbeaks and
hen pheasants and a "rebel drum,
mer" still calls. Prices have
changed by two hundred, "Vege-
tables are high,"
Lexington is houses sprawled
on desert-dusty streets with fer-
tile names.
The arrogant inherit lust,
but Thoreau's Walden is still
there, if only halfway his: "a sum-
the eastern bank. . .
Even today, the poet tells his
correspondent, who traveled far
in Concord,
. . . All poets climb back Eden's
hill
within their own backyard.
Woods and pond
were your recovery of the crop
that's possible,
a harvest of good words grown
from the land
that brings the whole world
home. I cultivate
a different orchard, pruning
under the sound
of probable war.
The culvitation of an orchard has
both a natural and a human way
of needing to go on; the poem is
praise for the recognition of this
need and for the human worth,
even promise, that this recog-
nition holds.
M R. BOOTH'S poetry points a
way out of the whimpering
world of quivering voices into a
land that if not flowing with milk
and honey and, if punctuated by'
screaming jets, is at least a place
of recognition. He has taken a

careful, long look at the worst and
tells Thoreau,
With rabits, too, we share un-
certain lives;
not quiet or desperate, we meas-
ure man
byhow he lives and what he
most believes ...
the good, the brave, are no
more a majority
than when you walked this far
spring shore.
This sounds Mr. Booth's calmer,
firmer resolve; he is no closet
poet, no giddy dreamer, but a man
thinking and feeling deeply. He
expresses carefully m ea su r ed
praise for the life he finds it pos-
sible to labor into existence and
love for its meaning:
At home beneath both
oak and jet, praising what I
halfway understand
I walk this good March morn-
ing out
to say my strange love in a
distant land.

r-

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": :V:.;:

ership in

Men's

Wear that has made
them a leading suc-
cess on the Univer-
sity Campus.
0 This Spring, DRESS
CORRECTLY for all
occasions! You may
browse at your lei-
sure for Saffell &
Bush will gladly
show you the Ivy

,}' ° ?.:
,^ -A I-
l" ii::

.TsAINT
CREASE SISTA
LO.
LO WEARING
SHAPE M I N GF
FORTUNE FLANNEL
WOOL & ACRILAN*
No modern-day wardrobe's complete
without at least one flannel-the classic
suit that's always in good taste where-
ever it's worn! You'll appreciate the
luxury look and feel of Fortune Flannel
-a superb blend of wool and Acrilan-
in a choice of light, medium or dark'
tones-priced for the modest budget.
$50
*Chemnistrand's Acrilic Fibre
RABIDEAUIJALARRIS
"Where The Good Clothes Come From"
Open Monday Nite 'Til 8:30-
Tuesday Thru Saturday 'Til 5:30
119 SOUTH MAIN ST. ANN ARBOR

9-

Those who appreciate the
FINER things in life visit the
FINEST record shop in Ann Arbor -
The Music Center.
We take pride in having the most
complete stock in town, an under-
stood guarantee on all merchandise,
and experienced personnel who will
gladly assist you in your selections.

U

11

I

r"",B
7',7
I' (

EAUTIFULLY
AND IN SO
COLORS AND
Our sweatered cottc
outfits. Stripes, printC
be found, and each w
as-down Orion cardig<

ron and

Cotton Dres
Priced
SIZES 7-]

Look for Spring.

1-

Other nE
Dresses;
Sizes
to 2

From Magoo

to Mendelssohn

SAIFFELIL & BUSH
On State Street
FOR OVER A QUARTER CENTURY

From Pogo to Prokofiejf
WE HAVE IT
at
TAhe #tuic Ceatter'
0 300 SOUTH THAYER

' ' ,

A

ON FOREST ... just off South U.

Li

z

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