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February 23, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23,1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACWT'a" V.V

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23,1957 THE MICHIGAN DAIly PAI~W 'rrmu'w'

jrxx iirr

M'

Icers

Edge

Is U,

54;

Gym

Team

Triumphs

Early Lead
Threatened
By Spartans
(Continued from Page 1)p
For the remainder of the period,
Michigan held off the onrushing
Michigan State team. Several
times the Spartans broke loosef
on a breakaway only to be stopped
by the acrobatic net-minding of
Childs.
The third period was opened
with both teams determined to
win. Tom Rendall deflected the
puck past Selinger at 9:48 to give
Michigan a temporary two goal
advantage.
TASU came roaring back on a 40
foot goal by Ed Pollesel at 10:21,
but the tired Wolverines held on
to gain the victory.
Only eight penalties were called
during the game; however they
were timely. State scored twice
when Michigan was a man short.
32 Straight
FIRST PERIOD: Scoring - 1 --
Michigan, Dunnigan (McDonald,
Switzer) 3:02; 2 - Michigan, Starr
(unassisted) 7:51; 3-Michigan, Max-
well (Schiller and Starr) 11:34; 4-
Michigan, Maxwell (Starr, T. Ren-
dall) 17:21; 1 - Michigan State, Mac-
Kenzie (E. Pollesel), 19:27.
Penalties - Michigan, Switzer
(roughing) 9:18; Michigan State, De-
Vuono (roughing) 9:18; Michigan,
Hayton (cross checking) 10:21; Mich-
igan State, Polano (tripping) 10:37.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring - 2 --
Michigan State, MacDonald (Mac-
Kenzie) 15:36; 3 ' Michigan State,
Jasson (MacKenzie) 16:22.
Penalties - Michigan, Hutton
(hooking) 10:22; Michigan, J. Ren-
dali (slashing) 15:47.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring - 5 -
Michigan, T. Rendall (Maxwell,
Starr); 4 - Michigan State, E. Pol-
lesel (Parke, Polano) 10:21.
Penalties - Michigan, Karpinka
(slashing) 4:04; Michigan State, Mac-
Donald (charging) 4:04.

Gymnasts To

p Navy Pier;

Gagnier Wins Four Events
Special to The Daily
The big surprise of the evening
CHICAGO -- The Michigan was Jim Hayslett's first place in
gymnastics team took a giant the parallel bars over Big Ten
step up the victory ladder by champion Ed Gagnier, who came
soundly defeating the Illinois in right behind him. Luken ex-
Navy Pier squad last night, 73-38. pressed how "pleased and de
The Wolverines virtually swept lighted" he was with Hayslett'
their opponents off their feet by "extremely good performance."
copping first place in every event, Ed Gagnier, however, was the
Coach Newt Loken's squad will outstanding performer and high
battle the Northwestern Wildcats point man for Michigan as he
this afternoon at 3 p.m. EST. captured four firsts, in the free
The Wolverines put on a show exercise, side horse, high bar and
of terrific power and depth as tumbling, and two seconds in par-
they racked up their first win allel bars and flying rings.
after dropping their last two Michigan's trampoline group
meets. ic h-na tam n e rou

S1
-E
-h

MacKay in USLTA Indoor
Championship Semi-finals

NEW YORK (R) - Giant-killer
Barry MacKay of Dayton, Ohio
and Denmark's Kurt Nielsen used
exploding services today to gain
the semifinals of the National In-
door Tennis Championships.
MacKay, 21, a University of
Michigan Senior who upset de-
fending champion Ulf Schmidt of
Sweden Thursday night, continued
an impressive display of power in
eliminating Grant Golden of Wil-
mette, Ill., 6-3, 8-6.
Nielsen, twice runner-up at
Wimbledon failed to work up a
sweat in eliminating Paul Cranis,
a left-handed army private from
Fort Dix, N. J., 6-2, 6-4. He won

the first set in 12 minutes, the
second in 17.
MacKay's semifinal opponent
will be the winner of the match be-
tween. third-seeded Herbie Flam
of Beverly Hills, Calif., and Eddie
Moylan of Trenton, N.J., who won
the recent Invitation Indoor at
Buffalo, N. Y.
Both MacKay and Nielsen won
on the blinding speed of their ser-
vices which sent shots off the slick
boards of the armory like cannon
shots. Nielsen never lost his ser-
vice. MacKay had a lapse and
dropped a service in the 12th game
of the long second set after break-
ing Golden.

-Daily-Charles Curtiss
WINNING GOAL -- Michigan's Ton Rendall (12) scores the
winning goal midway through the third period of last night's
game at Michigan State.

Easily Done
FREE EXERCISE: Gagnier, M,
(259); 2. Hayslett, M, (244); 3. Horn,
UIC, (226).
TRAMPOLINE: 1. Cole, M, (267);
2. Newman, M, (242); 3. Clarkson,
MW, (220).
SIDE HORSE: 1. Gagnier, M,
(257); 2. Porps, UIC, (234); 3. Arm-
strong, M, (219).
HIGH BAR: 1. Gagnier, M, (253);
2. Horn, UIC, (251); 3. Koepke, UIC,
(237).
PARALLEL BARS: 1. Hayslett, 1W,
(273): 2. Gagnier, M, (267); 3. War-
ren, M, (250).
FLYING RINGS: 1. Wiese, 'M,
(242); 2. Gagnier, M, (240); 3. Iorn,
UIC, (230). /
TUMBLING: 1. Gagnier, M, (241);
2. Hayslett, M, (234); 3. Horn, UIC,
(199). s

was as strong as ever, taing all
three places despite the absence
of Dick Kimball. Kimball will
take part in the swimming meet
at Indiana today.
Ed Cole took first-place honors
on the tramp, with Frank New-
man sand Chuck Clarkson taking
second and third, respectively.
Horn Paces Oppoa uts
The Navy Pier s5zuad was paced
by Sandy Horn, who took a third
in free exercise, a second on the
high bar, and thirds in the fly-
inm rings and tumbaing.
Aside from Horn's contribu-
tions, Navy Pier could only garner
a third by Barry Koepke in the
high bar and second in the side
orse event by Ernie Porps.
Michigan's Nick Wiese won his
specialty, the flyinT r1-

Fort Dix, N. J., 6-2, 6-4. He won ing Golden.

BARRY MacKAY
... still advancing

Come

to Church

Sport Shorts

Sunday

'I

No More Olympics
NEW YORK (P)-Milton Camp-
bell, 1956 Olympic decathlon
champion, said Friday he would
not compete in the next Olympic
games.
He said he has been "thinking
about" an offer to play profession-
al football with the Cleveland
Browns.
AAU Track
NEW YORK (P)-The National
AAU Track and Field Champion-
ships-the biggest whirligig of the
indoor season-will take over Mad-
ison Square Garden for almost 12
hours today. I
But most of the interest will be

on three runners-Ronnie De-
lany of Villanova, Fred Dwyer,
formerly of the New York Ath-
letic Club, and Laszlo ',Tabori of
Hungary.
They'll race in the mile, and it
will mark the first meeting of all
three during the winter campaign.
Delany has beaten each indi-
vidually.
Basilio KO's Saxton
CLEVELAND ()-Carmen Ba-
silio, a savage grim-faced warrior,
made short work of Johnny Sax-
ton last night, bombing the ex-
champ with a chilling; left hook to
retain 'his world welterweight title
on a knockout in 2:42 of the second
round.

LATE WIHL SCORES
Minnesota 3, Michigan Tech
North Dakota 5, Denver 2

3

RUSSIA HAS SLIGHT

EDGE:

Gagnier Views U.S., Soviet Gymnastics

By AL JONES
(Last in a series of three ar-
tices expressing the views of
Michigan gymnast Ed Gagner
on gymnastics as an American
and a world sport.)
"In general, the Russian gym-
nasts are not much superior to the
Americans.",
Ed Gagnier, Michigan's top gym-
nast, makes this statement with
no reserve, although he was on
hand at Melbourne, Aust., last De-
cember to witness the Russian
sweep of Olympic gymnastic com-
petition.
Gagnier goes on to point out
that the Russians are only slightly
better in an overall sense, and that
the Americans basically need more
practice and considerable time to
even up the present Soviet ad-
vantage.
Noticeably Stronger
"The Russians are noticeably
stronger on the high bar, parallel
bars, and long horse," Gagnier
notes. "Nevertheless, it is not these
apparatus that make the differ-
ence, but the fact that the Rus-
sians have an overall polish that

Americans have been unable to
equal thus far."
"I don't think that the Ameri-
cans will place in the 1960 Olym-
pics either. The main reason is
that the United States doesn't
enter enough international com-
petition."
Gagnier points out the the
practice of judging in the United
States has hurt the sport con-
siderably. "When there are 70 or
80 men working on each piece of
equipment," he explains, "the
judge must figure out beforehand
who he expects to win, so that he
can set up a suitable point scale.
U.S. Scale
"In the United States, this scale
usually runs between 85 and 100,
but I have often seen a man scored
as low as 60. Also, it is not at all
unusual for the event to be won
by a score in the low 90's. I re-
member an event in the NOAA
Meet won by a 92.
"To a European this would be
horrible. They set their scale from
95-100, and hardly ever score a
man lower than that. They at-
tempt to make the scores as high

as possible, mostly for the sake of
propaganda. They want the gym-
nasts to get the highest score pos-
sible so that he will appear good to
those who weren't at the meet.
More Critical
"I will admit that the Ameri-
cans are more critical in their
judging, and this probably helps
the men to improve. Nevertheless,
when a European hears that an
NCAA event was won by a 92, he
thinks that the competition must
be very poor.
"I feel that the United States
isn't recognizing its own athletes
as good, and in an international
light ,is putting them behind the
eight-ball. They are taking the
wrong attitude, and the Americans
at the Games suffered from the
poor publicity that the scoring
had created."

There Is A Place In This Picture For You!
I 1
1OPPORTUNITIES.1
for Students with Bachelor Degrees in
* CHEMICAL ENGINEERING t
* CHEMISTRY
* MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
This is a chance to get a head start in your professional
career with General Chemical Division, Allied Chemical &
Dye Corporation. Company representatives will be on the
campus for interviews February 25, 26
Contact Placement Office Today For an interview,
Appointment and Descriptive Literature
GENERALCHEMICA L DIVISION.
ALLIED CHEMICAL & DYE CORPORATION I
40 Rector Street, New York b, N. Y.
L .... n i rW 1 6 =d- w a. m

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press,tPastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service: Sermon topic "Re-
sponsibility of Hearing."
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group. Dr. Donald Pelz
on "Qualitative Aspects of Employment in
Ann'"Arbor."
11 A.M. Services -- Rev. Edward H. Redman
preaching on: "Introducing Martin Buber."
1 2 P.M. Coffee Hour
7 P.M. Unitarian Students hear Dr. Laslo Kov-
acsi, newly arrived from Hungary, speak on:
'Democracy in Action."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, chaplain
Masses Daily at 6:30 A.M., 7:00 A.M., 8:00
A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Rosary daily at 5:10 P.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
....12 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St, & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 & 1 1:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Martin Luther Film
MONDAY
8:00 P.M. Dr. George Mendenhall - Study of
the Old Testament.
THURSDAY
9:30 P.M. Vespers

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Ministers,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Hearld of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wi. S. Baker, Campus Minister
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
10:30 A.M. Study of the Student Movement Mer-
ger, Co-op Lounge.
11 :30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
5:30 P.M. W.S.F. Supper, Social Hall.
7:00 P.M. Vesper Service, Sanctuary.
8:00 P.M. "Must We Say God is Three-In-One?"
Seminar-discuss.
9:00 P.M. Fellowship Hour.
MONDAY
8:00 P.M. "A New Approach to the Old Testa-
ment," Seminar-lead by Prof. George Men-
denhall. Lutheran Student Center.
TUESDAY
4:30 P.M. Question Box Discussion, Pat Pickett's
apartment, 217 S. Observatory (above Clark's
Son the "H ill").
9:30 - 10:30 Coffee Hour, Pat Pickett's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 P.M. "Brass Tacks," Bible study and dis-
cussion, League.
THURSDAY
4:15 P.M. Bible Study "Revelations," League.
4 - 6:00 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's apart-
ment.
FRIDAY
6:30 P.M. Grad Dinner, Lewis Room.
7:00 P.M. "Modern Rivals, to Christianity",
Grad discussion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday - Sat-
urday 11:00 A.M to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
New Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Wednesday, Feb. 27 - "Evolution of Life."
Listen to Radio Theosophy: Sundays 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc.)
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Dr. Merrill P. Abbey will
speak on "What is Vital in Religion?"
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Social Hall.
Play, "Aria do Capo," Edna St. Vincent Mil-
lay.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
SUNDAY at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor on "Jesus and
First-Rate Minds."
SUNDAY at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program. Business meet-
ing and ceremony welcoming new members of
Gamma Delta.
WEDNESDAY at 9:15 P.M.: Hour of Fellowship.
THURSDAY at 8:00: Church Membership Class.
FRIDAY at 7:30: Gamma Delta meets for an eve-
ning of sports activities at IM Building.

r

I

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11

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
Morning Sermon: "When the Hearti
God."
Evening Sermon: "Faith on Trial."
1 0:00 Sunday School.
1 1:00 Morning Worship.
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service.
Wednesday-8:00 Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!

is Right With

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone
9:45 A.M. Bible class studies, "Proverbs."
11:00 A.M. Worship -- "The Activities of a
Christian," by Dr. Loucks.
6:00 P.M. Cabinet Meeting.
6:45 P.M. Mrs. Ivy Reed will speak on music
in the church.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. The Rev. Leonard
A. Parr will preach on "THE GREAT CEN-
TRALITIES OF RELIGION."
The Student Guild will meet at the Memorial
Christian Church at 7:00 P.M. Bob Rikkers,
the new Associate Director, will speak on the
subject, "QUEST FOR FAITH."

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at the Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5-6 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper.

t

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister

About to take the plunge into the business and pro-

11

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