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February 21, 1957 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-21

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SFV R

TflURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1957 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Elliott Selected To Coach

Wolverines' Backfield

G
Not Considered by Crisler
As Oosterbaan's Successor

r- -

(Continued from Page 1)
other Conference championship
to become Crisler's assistant.
Oosterbaan, who was Elliott's
backfield coach, also had high
praise for his new assistant.
'An All-American'
'Elliott is an All-American both
on and off the field, and I have
gredt admiration for him as a fine
gentleman and a student of foot-
ball. I am most happy to have him
back, and I know the entire Mich-
igan family feels the same way."
The addition of Elliott to the
staff will cause no changes in
Michigan o f f e n s i v e patterns.
When asked about this, Ooster-
baan flatly said, "no".
Oosterbaan said that Elliott
was coming back to Ann Arbor
A within the next seven to ten days
with his wife to look for housing,
and that ".. . we will try and help
him find something."
Starts in Spring
Elliott will begin his job fully
with the opening of spring prac-
tice on April 8.
Elliott's salary estimates range
from $11,300 to $11,500, which, it
is reported, will make him the
highest-paid assistant on the
staff. Elliott was reported to have
earned $10,000 as Evashevski's
aide.
Elliott joined the Iowa staff in
1952. Before that he worked un-
der Laverne (Kip) Taylor at Ore-
gon State, beginning his career
there in 1948.

Elliott assisted at spring prac-
tice at Michigan in 1948 while he
was still a senior.
Elliott spent his first year of
football eligibility at Purdue as a
Marine trainee in 1943 and 1944.
He returned from Marine Corps
duty in China to Michigan inI
1946.
Four Touchdowns
That year he scored four touch-
downs and had a 5.1 yard season
rushing average.
In 1947 he was a member of
Crisler's streamlined backfield
that led Michigan through an un-
beaten and untied season to the
Big Ten and Rose Bowl cham-
pionships.
The smooth quartet of Elliott,
Bob Chappuis, Jack Weisenbur-
ger and Howie Yerges set new
records in winning the Rose Bowl
crown from Southern California,
49-0, in 1947.
Top Scorer
That year he was the Big Ten's
top scorer with nine touchdowns
for 54 points. He was named on
the Coaches All-America, be-
came the fourth Michigan man
to be selected as the most valuable
player in the Western Conference,
and ended the year by winning
the Chicago Tribune Silver Foot-
ball trophy.
He was second highest ground
gainer on the squad with a 6.4
yard average per play in that fi-
nal season.

I-M Relays
Time trials for the annual
I-M Indoor Relays will be held
at Yost Field House tonight
from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
The final relays are sched-
uled as part of Saturday's dual
track meet between Michigan
and Illinois.
Tonight's events will bring
together contestants in resi-
dence ball,social fraternity
and independent divisions.
Teams with the four fastest
times In each division will earn
the right to compete in Sat-
urday's running.

Hockey Competition Open
To Ann Arbor Youngsters

BUMP ELLIOTT
... agrees to terms
Hockey Tickets
A limited supply of the com-
bination bus and game admis-
sion tickets for the hockey
game between Michigan and
Michigan State Friday night
at East Lansing is still avail-
able at the new Student Acti-
vities Building on Jefferson St.
between 1-4 p.m. at the price
of $3.50.
Students planning to drive
by automobile to the game
should be able to purchase un-
reserved seats easily if they
get to East Lansing an hour be-
fore game time, which is 8 p.m.,
since the Spartans' arena is
seldom filled to capacity.

FRITZ CRISLER BENNIE OOSTERBAAN
... 'perfectly delighted' ... 'most happy'

By SI COLEMAN
Those of you who attend Michi-
gan hockey games regularly -
have you ever wondered about
those kids who clean the ice after
each game and then shift to their
own small skirmishes with the
puck?
Well, for the most part, they are
all members and players of a
rather unknown league around the
campus area-the Ann Arbor Kid-
die League.
Youngsters Get Chance
Six years ago, four Ann Arbor-
ites got together and decided that
the youngsters of this area should
be provided with an opportunity
to play competitive hockey. The
Kiddie League resulted from this
discussion.
Responsible for its formation
were principally four men. Michi-
gan's present coach, Vic Heyliger
was one of them. The hockey coach
at the present time at Michigan
Tech, Jack McInnes, furnished
valuable assistance.
An English professor here at the
the University lent another hand.
His name-Carl Litzenburg. And

Dr. Tom Giltson rounded out the
four principal founders.
These men went for help to the
business men of Ann Arbor. Fortu-
nately for the youngsters, they got
it.
Time to use the Coliseum ice was
granted by Michigan athletic di-
rector "Fritz" Crisler. Unfortu-
nately, there was not enough va-
cant time to permit the kids to
practice, but "even with only game
conditions," Heyliger reported,
"many of the boys have progressed
rather well."
The league is composed funda-
mentally of boys from the age of
nine to 17, and they participate
primarily for the reason that they
hope to develop themselves into
polished hockey players, in addi-
tion to just having fun on the ice.
Varsity players here at Michigan
lend their time to officiate many
of the games. At times they also
serve as coaches of the individual
teams.
Perhaps one of these youngsters
will be a future Wolverine star or
even a professional great. You
.never can tell.

CC, NODAKS DOMINATE:
j WIHL Race Reflected by Scoring

By CARL RISEMAN
The torrid race for the Western
Intercollegiate Hockey League
championship is closely reflected
in the League's individual scoring
race.
League-leading Colorado Col-
lege claims three of the top six
scorers in the league. Second
place North Dakota has two of
its players in the top six includ-
ing the league's leading scorer,
Jim Ridley.
Ridley has scored 15 goals and
has assisted on 15 others, good for
30 points.
Bob McCusker, top scorer on
the Colorado College squad, re-
mained in second place with 28
points. McCusker is also thetop
goal-getter in the circuit with 16..
North Dakota's Bill Reichart
and Colorado College's Jim Hay
are closing in on the leaders. They
are tied for third place with 27
points each.
Tom Kennedy of Michigan
Tech and Ike Scott of Colorado
College round out the top six.
Ed Pollesel of Michigan State

Michigan Intercollegiate Ski Association
Sponsors Meets for Student Enthusiasts

By PAUL BORMAN
Although it is listed as a minor
sport at the University because it
doesn't receive Varsity recognition,
this misleading ranking takes
nothing away from the great sport
of skiing.
Representing Michigan in this
exciting sport is the ULLR Ski
Club, which competes in regularly-
scheduled meets sponsored by the
Michigan Intercollegiate Ski As-
sociation.
At Boyne Mountain
The most recent meet was held
at Boyne Mountain on February
2-3.
Nine Michigan colleges were
represented in the seventh annual
contest, which consisted* of a
downhill race and a slalom.
Five participants from each
school were allowed to officially
compete, although some schools
unofficially entered a second team.
Skiers were given two chances
in each event and the team's four
best times in each event were
chosen.
Competition for first place was
narrowed to three schools with
the results of the opening event-
the downhill race-Michigan State
(250.9), Michigan Tech (253.4) and
Michigan (257.1).
Only seven seconds separated
the top trio and in contrast, over
22 seconds elapsed between the
third and fourth place squads.
Testing the agility of the skiers
was the job of the slalom. This
concluding race consisted of 26
gates placed around the course in

such a way that the skiers had to
move around and between them.
Closeness in times was just as
apparent in the slalom event as
in the downhill race with only 16
seconds separating the top trio,
while the fourth place squad
trailed the third place team by
almost one hundred seconds.
Tech Leads Way
Leading the way was Tech with
346.5, Michigan followed at 359.2
and State was last at 362.
Combining the sub-totals, the
final results found Tech in first
with 599.9 seconds, State second
with 612 and the Wolverines third
at 616.3.
Skiing on the ULLR men's first
team were Bob Litzenberger, Balz,
Fischer, John Genn, Paul New-
comb and Wes Anderson, in order
of their finish.
Second Team
The unofficial second team was
made up of John Dinan, Ted
Doderhoff, rick Fenski, John Ken-
nedy and John Smith.
In the women's division, where
individual performances are count-
ed instead of team performances,
Patti Earhart of Michigan took all
the individual honors.
She placed first in both the
downhill and slalom events, re-
cording the phenomenal time of
3:03.2. This mark led her chal-
lenger by 45.7 seconds.
Miss Zimmers Eighth
Carol Zimmers, the only other
Michigan coed entered, finished
eighth in the combined events.

Thunder Mountain will be the
site of the next meet on February
24, when the club will compete
against five other state schools.
U.

">-
7
I
f
i
l
1
s

is the penalty king with 19
whistles for 52 minutes.
North Dakota's Tom Yurkovich
remains the top goalie, having
allowed 40 goals in 14 games for a
2.9 average. Michigan's Ross
Childs is second with a 3.0 aver-
age, having allowed 15 goals in
5 games.
The individual scoring:
(Key: G-Goals, A-Assists, Pts.-
Points, Pens.-Penalties, Pin. Penal-
ties in Minutes)
G A Pts. Pens. Pim
Ridley, N.D. 15 15 30 9 26
McCusker, C. C. 16 12 28 8 32
Hay, C. C. 10 17 27 7 14
Reichart, N. D. 12 15 27 1 2
Kennedy, M. Tech 5 17 22 3 6
Scott, C. C. 14 6 20 5 10
Michigan Players:
G A Pts. Pens. Pin.
Rendall 9 9 18 2 4
Dunnigan 7 S 15 2 4
McDonald 6 8 14 2 4
McIntosh 2 10 12 2 12
Switzer 5 6 11 7 14
Hutton 5 5 10 8 16
Maxwell 4 4 S 2 4
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PERSONNEL TECHNICIAN
($4,802 to start)
One to three positions to be filled in May or June in the
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classification, recruitment, training and research pro-
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development program, steady promotion, and a lifetime
career. Must be under 35 and a college graduate by June
1957.
Application must be submitted by Feb. 27
Write Michigan Civil Service, Lansing 13

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Career opportunities for the men of '57
ENGINEERS* CHEMISTS PHYSICISTS
Ceramic -Chemical -Civil
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National Carbon Company, America's foremost manu-
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Interesting, rewarding careers in research, process
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February 28
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A Division of

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