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February 20, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-20

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PAGE S

TH M~'I A nAT? ,.. pi~i r.Ej

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THV 1WtWiVTN, 1V l A NT .L

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20,1957

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Games

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PERSONNEL TECHNICIAN
($4,802 to start)
One to three positions to be filled in May or June in the
office of the Michigan Civil Service Commission in Lan-
sing. This office conducts a complete examining, job
classification, recruitment, training and research pro-
gram for 29,000 state employees. An intensive on-the-job
development program, steady promotion, and a lifetime
career. Must be under 35 and a college graduate by June
1957.
Application must be submitted by Feb. 27
Write Michigan Civil Service, Lansing 13

AwvyGames I
To WY yvolverine
By DALE CANTOR
The Michigan basketball team
must really believe in the adage
'There's no place like home."I
Throughout the entire 1956-571
season, the Maize and Blue have
r succeeded in winning only one
game away from the home hard-
N woods-and that win washstill in
K the state of Michigan when the
Wolverines slid past the Spartans,
70-69, at East Lansing.
JIM SHEARON Stop and Go
Sincethe beginning of Confer-
... dependable stand-in ence play this year, the Michigan
cagers have acted somewhat like
an overworked Model-T Ford-
they stop and go, and stop and go;
you crank them up again and they
sputter for awhile and then stop
once again.
The Wolverines no sooner put
away an important victory than
they turn around and drop their
next game, only to fall lower into
the doldrums of the second divis-
ion of the Big Ten standings.
Monday night's loss to Purdue I
is a little harder to digest after
y watching the same quintet workE
wonders last Saturday n i g h t
scoring r eordswi t thir 12-9
triumph.

Prove Fatal
Cage Squad
Kramer, George Lee, M. C. Bur-
ton and Jim Shearon.
The same Jim Shearon, who
stepped in for injured guard Jack
Lewis, "did a very fine job at
Purdue," said Perigo.
Tied For Sixth
Coach Perigo continued, "We
missed clutch free throws down
there, but otherwise we played
pretty well."
The Boilermakers also threw a
real tight aggressive defense that
the Wolverines could not cope
with.

Nine Teams Make Playoffs;
Forfeits Mar Final Night

___ Ajjj" o t

NEWT LOKEN
... heads determined squad

r

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A CL NCE S

eakness in Tumbling
Tandicaps Gym Squad

KAEEYC:Ite
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sl

70

Everything for the Skater and the Skier
N. UNIVERSITY HRROLD S. TRICK 902 S. STATE

Miss at Purdue
The Illinois and Purdue con-
tests were both close ones until
the last minutes of play. However,
the Wolverines did not miss the
basket when they needed baskets
most Saturday night-they did
miss at Purdue.
Coach Bill Perigo praised Ron
Kramer highly for his good work
in both tilts. Kramer went on a
20-point scoring surge in the sec-'
ond half of Saturday night's game
to engineer the road to victory and
was the driving force in Monday
night's battle with a total of 18
points.
The Illinois game tells its own
story-the Maize and Blue showed
that they can win as four Wol-
verines hit for double figures:

a
Iti
0
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V,
9"
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0
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a
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a
0
N3
t+

Tumbling was the nemesis of the
Michigan Gymnastic team over the
weekend.
Friday night against Iowa the
Wolverines went into the last
event, tumbling, trailing by one
point. "Showman" Sam Bailie took
first place and wee Len Stalte took
third, good for eight of the pos-
sible 16 points in the event and
Michigan lost 5612-551/2.
Lead Disappears
Monday night against Michigan
State the Wolverines went into the
last event, tumbling, leading by
one point.
Don Leas and Jim Cook both of
State took first and second res-
pectively and Michigan lost 5812
5312
All of this points up one thing,
kt the present time Michigan is
weak in tumbling.
Injury Damaging
One of the reasons, of course,
is the injury to Nick Wiese's ankle
which has kept him out of the
free exercise and tumbling.
There is a possible good effect
of the weekend losses.
It was the first time in the last
two years that Coach Newt Loken's
Wolverines have lost two meets in
a row.
This does not make Coach Loken
and his team very happy for they
are proud of their winning rec-
ord.
As coach Loken says, "we feel
we are as strong as either of the
teams that beat us."

The team began practicing Tues-
day with a determination to prove
themselves in the Big Ten Meet
before the home audience March
7-8. They are concentrating on
perfecting their stunts in order to
pick up those few points here and
there that could mean a possible
title.
"If perserverance and the will
to work is any indication, we are
going to make a very strong show-
ing in the finals," said Coach
Loken.
N. Carolina
Tops Furman
By The Associated Press
North Carolina, the nation's top-
ranked team, made it 21 wins in
a row last night by defeating
North Carolina State 86-57 in an
Atlantic Coast Conference basket-
ball game.
Grady Wallace's 27 points paced
South Carolina to a 87-55 win over
Furman. Wallace continues to lead
the nation's collegiate scorers al-
though his average dropped to
30.41 per game. Right on his heels
is Columbia's Chet Forte with a
29.56 average.
Other important contests were
Georgia Tech 87, Tennessee 85 and
Virginia 90, Duke 81.

Delta Upsilon showed the way
as nine social fraternity 'A' teams
won their division titles and gained
IM first place playoff births.
Last night's action was marked
not only by the crowning of
champions, but was also marred
by the usual final night of for-
feits, four in all.
SAM Falls
DUI led by Jim Meyers with 15
points, John Grettenberger with 10
points, and Art Wible also with 10
points, defeated Sigma Alpha Mu
49-29.
Sigma Nu obtained balanced
scoring from two of its players,
John Larson and Richard Norris,
as it entered the first place
championship ring with a 60-24
victory over Theta Delta Chi.
Larson was the big gun with 16
points.
Phi Kappa Sigma won their di-
visional title with a defeat of
Lambda Chi Alpha, 57-9. Bill
Lyons was top scorer with 18
points.
Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta
Tarheels Lead
AP Cage Poll
By The Associated Press
Collecting 62 per cent of the
first-place votes, North Carolina's
unbeaten Tar Heels remained the
top club in the Associated Press
weekly college basketball poll
Tuesday with the Kansas Jay-
hawks a close second.
Winners of 20 games in a row,
the Tar Heels picked up 55 firsts
and 806 points on the usual basis
of 10 for first place, 9 for second
etc. The nation's sportswriters and
sportscasters gave Kansas 17 firsts
and 756 points.
The top 10 teams follow W~ith
first place votes and won-lost rec-
ords through Saturday in paren-
theses:
1. N. Carolina 55 (20-0) 806
2. Kansas ....17 (16-1) 756
3. Kentucky .. 2 (18-4) 474
4. Seattle .... 4 (19-2) 401
5. Bradley .... 5 (17-3) 387
6. S. Methdist (17-3) 341
7. Louisville .. 2 (17-4) 289
8. UCLA ..... (18-2) 238
9. Iowa State (15-5) 130
10. Vanderbilt . (15-4) 99

Theta, and Beta Theta Pi all won
their division crowns in hard
fought games, while Alpha Epsilon
Pi was knocked from the unbeaten
ranks by Kappa Alpha Psi, 43-23.
ATO took a 21-15 half-time lead
and then coasted to a 44-21 win
over Phi Epsilon Pi.
Phi Delta Theta and Delta Tau
Delta both started their game with
perfect records. Phi Delta Theta
swept to a 18-4 lead at the half
and went on to win, 32-21.
Many Forfeits
Beta Theta Pi came out of their
game with Tau Delta Phi with a
perfect record on the strength of
a 31-23 win.
Sigma Chi, Zeta Beta Tau, and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon all ended
perfect seasons by virtue of for-
feits. The victories gave them di-
vision titles.
Other scores:
Alpha Delta Pi 36, Kappa Sig-
ma 19; Delta Sigma Phi 29, Tri-
gon 15; Phi Sigma Delta 43, Zeta
Psi 30; Theta Chi 60, Triangle 7;
Chi Phi 60, Acacia 16; Chi Psi 25,
Phi Kappa Tau 18; Sigma Phi over
Alpha Sigma Phi (forfeit)-- R. D.
WIHL Race
At A GlanceI
W L T Pts PL
Col. College 12 3 0 16 3
N. Dakota 11 4 0 11 4
Mich. Tech 7 5 2 91/261/
MICHIGAN 7 4 1 82 71/
Last Night's Game
Col. College 6, North Dakota 4
Games left: Col. College 3,
North Dakota 7, Michigan
Tech 6, MICHIGAN 6.
All teams play for total of 24
points.
NIGHT EDITOR
BOB BOLTON

711?

sea

wYY C

I

I

ENGINEERING

4

AND

f

New "high-road" to
in Florida

SCIENCE

GRADUATES

Canadair Limited, in Montreal, has attractive openings
for graduates in the following categories:

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CIVIL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MATHEMATICS & PHYSICS
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
NUCLEAR PHYSICS

Heralding important things to come, work
was begun in late summer, 1956, on a wide
access road in a remote section of Palm
Beach County, Florida. At the end of that
road, situated northwest of West Palm
Beach, a 500,000-square-foot plant destined
to be the newest addition to Pratt & Whit-
ney Aircraft engineering facilities is already
well under construction.
Here, engineers and scientists will soon
be hard at work dealing with new and in-
creasingly complex problems relating to ad-
vanced jet aircraft engines. Working in close
coordination with men at other P & W A
establishments - particularly the com-
nDnv's multi-million-dollar Andrew Will-

this newest section of the Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft team will face a challenging.assign-
ment. They, too, will be concerned with
design, testing and development of highly
advanced, extremely powerful jet engines
which will join a family already including
J-57 and J-75 turbojets, currently playing
important roles in the growing military and
commercial air power of the United States.
The engineering graduate who begins his
career at this Florida facility will have the
rare opportunity of keeping pace with its
anticipated growth. In an organization re-
nowned for development engineering su-
periority, he will gain invaluable experience
workingo n viti l-tIn-ranga n'ortc fha+

These openings are for design, research and develop-
ment of advanced aircraft and guided missiles, as
well as commercial applications of nuclear energy.
An interesting training program is offered to selected
applicants.

Al

x

OUR REPRESENTATIVE WILL-BE HERE

F RIDAY, MARCH 8th

PLEASE CONTACT YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENT

I

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