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February 19, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MRUARY 19.19'?

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. FEBRTJARY 19, 19~Y

SAFER NIGHT DRIVING:

'Cross-Eye'
By RONALD SCHELKOPF
Prof. H. Richard Blackwell, di-
rector of the University's Vision
Research Laboratories, is a man
of ideas.
His ideas center around one of
the most provocative problems of
today - highway safety. As a re-
searcher in human vision, he is
most immediately interested in
headlighting as it affects the eye
in night driving.
With the innovation of four-
headlamp styling on new cars,
Prof. Blackwell envisions a new
headlighting system that would
take the "glare" out of night driv-
ing.
A cross-beam type of headlight-
ing is "in the realm of probability
with the new headlamp styling,"
says Prof. Blackwell.
In his proposed "cross-eye" type
of headlighting, the light from
the right headlamp would be fo-
cused to the left and downward
-out of an approaching driver's
eyes. The left beam would be fo-
cused near the edge of .the road
on the right side, there caroming
off luminescent "retro-reflectors,"
which are to be placed along the
roadside.
Could Look to Right
Rather than look into an ap-
proaching driver's lights, the
cross-beam system would enable
the driver to look to the right edge
of the road. He could then guage
his distance from the opposite
lane and traffic by measuring vis-
ually, the distance between the
reflectors and the edge of the
highway.
Glare affecting night drviers
depends on "how bright, how big, MA
and where it is in relation to the Univ
viewer," Prof. Blackwell explains. to tr
The angle at which the eye per-
ceives a bright light must be in- cautio
creased as the light approaches at 60 r
and the glare is more pronounced. feet, h
Prof. Blackwell advises instead appear
of looking directly into oncoming in th
lights, a driver should look to the avoid]
right edge of the road approxi- turns
mately 100 feet in front of his car. too so
He can then guage the distance never1
between his and another car and The
the center line by means of peri- has de
pheral vision. . during
People Switeh Too Soon resear
"People don't drive right at Amo
night," Professor Blackwell ex- flasher
claims. He advises that drivers signed
use their parking lights the min- autom
ute that twilight descends, and such a
that headlights be applied as soon espec
as there is enough darkness to windin
bring out contrasts between ob- As t
jects with the lights. -
"People demand depression (a
switch to low beam) too soon,"
says the psychologist. He points
out that most drivers want an-
other driver to switch from high r
to low beam the minute another
car is in sight.
"Drivers are taking a chance in T
their politeness," he warns. Ob-
jects may loom up under low
beam which cannot be seen with
anything except bright light.
"Drivers shouldn't depress un- H
til they are within 100 to 200 feet f
of another car," Prof. Blackwell

Lights, Suggested

To Promote
41
Fellowship
Feb. 17 through 24 is Brother-
hood Week.
As a part of this nation-wide
observance, Detroit Judge Joseph
A. Moynihan will speak at a city-
wide Brotherhood Dinner at 6:30
p.m. on Feb. 21 in the ballroom
of the Michigan Union.
This dinner, as well as various
high school conferences on Broth-
erhood held throughout the year,
and the Ann Arbor self-survey,
are sponsored by the Ann Arbor
Roundtable of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews.
It is only a part of the work
of this civic organization engaged
in an educational program for
human relations.
The Conference enlists Protes-
tants, Catholics and Jews who be-
lieve that the practice of brother-
hood can lead to the peaceful so-
lution of neighborhood misunder-
standing.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Lecturers: Prof. Morgan Thomas, Ed-
ward W. Hughes, Lecturer; Prof. Rus-
sell H. Fifield, John R. Owens, In-
structor; Prof. George A. Peek, Jr., and
Prof. Marshall M. Knappen.

Registration for this class may be
made in Room 4501 of the Administra-
tion Building on South State Street
during University office hours and in
Room 164 of the School of Business
Administration, Corner of Monroe and
Tappan, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. the
night of the class.
ACS Student Affiliate. 7:00 p.m. Wed.
Feb. 20, Room 3003, Chemistry Build-
ing. Dr. Anderson will speak on "Some
Applicataions of Radiation to Chemis-
try," Refreshments.
Mathematics Colloquium: Tuesday,
February 19 at 4:10 p.m. in Room 3011
Angell Hall. Prof. Oscar Weser will
speak on "Topology. Group Theory
and Statistics." Tea and coffee will be
served at 3:45 in Room 3212 Angeil Hall.
Zoology Seminar. "The St. Lawrence
Seaway and its Economic Effects."
Russell Blakslee, Detroit city govern-
ment. 7:30 p.m. 1053 Natural Science.
Sociology Colloquium: Prof. Bert
Hoselitz, U. of Chicago, "A Sociological
Scheme to Analyze Economic Develop-
ments," Wednesday, Feb. 20, 4:15 p.m.,
West Conference Room, Rackham.
Events Today
Phi Delta Kappa. Omega Chapter will
meet Tues., Feb. 19 at 8:00 p.m. in
the' West Conference Room Rackham
Building. Prof. McKeachie of Psycholo-
gy and Prof. Garrison, Director of
Television, will speak briefly and lead
a discussion on "Implications of TV for
Education". Refreshments.
Placement Notices
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Thurs., Feb. 2a.
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit, Mich. - men with de-
grees in LS&A for BusAd for Sales
Training,
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
Detroit, Mich. - men in LS&A and
BusAd for Sales and Management
throughout the U.S.
The Cold Metal Pro ducts Co.,
Youngstown, Ohio - men with degrees
in Science or BusAd, Mech. or Metal

E. for Management and Sales Training.
Fri., Feb. 22
The Dow Chem. Co., Midland, Mich.
-men with any degrees who are in-
terested in the Dow Chem. Co., es-
interested in the Dow Chem. Co., es-
pecially in Sales, Industrial Relations,
Acctg. and Purchasing. Work in major
cities of U.S.
Union Carbide Nuclear Co., Oak
Ridge, Tenn. - men with degrees in
Physics, Math., and Chem. for Research
and Development, Production, Mainte-
nance and Operations. Also Technical
Librarians. Work in atomic energy
plants and laboratories in Tennessee
and Kentucky.
National Cash Register Co., Detroit,
Mich. - men in LS&A or BusAd. for
Sales.
Indianapolis Life Insurance Co., Ann
Arbor, Mich. - Men or women with'
B.A. or advanced degree who would be
interested in the life insurance busi-
ness, working with students on the de-
ferred premium payment basis.
Bauer & Black, Div. of Kendall Co.,!
Chicago, 111.-work in Chicago or Bos-
ton - men with degrees in LS&A or
BusAd for Executive Training Program.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
ext. 3371.
Summer Placement:
The following camps will have repre-
sentatives interviewing for personnel
in Room 30 of the Union, Wed., Feb.
20 from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Camp Conestoga, Leonidas, Mich.-
need general counselors; riding in-
structors; nurse; and assistant arts &
crafts supervisor. Facilities are avail-
abie for married couples.
Camp Nahelu, Ortonville, Mich. --
men and women to be general coun-
selors, waterfront specialist, arts and
crafts superivsor, and dramatics coun-
selors.
Camp Lawrence Cory, operated by!
the Rochester Y.M.C.A., on Keuka
Lake, N.Y., is particularly interested in

securing the services of several foreign
students, and will interview in the
afternoon only.
The Ann Arbor Y.M.C.A. & Y.W.C.A.
will also be present.
Jackson County Girl Scouts will in-
terview in the afternoon only.
Camp Nissokone, Oscoda, Mich. -
camp for boys.
Personnel Requests:
Avco Research Lab., Everett, Mass.,
has openings for Research Scientists
with degrees in Physics or Aerodynam-
ics, with and without experience.
Bankers Trust Co., New York, N.Y.,
offers opportunity to men interested
in various phases of banking; Commer-
cial Banking, Pension Trust Admin.,
Personal Trust and Estate Admin.,
Bond Trading, Underwriting, and Se-
curity Sales. Corporate Trust, Stock
Transfer, Controller Dept., Auditing,
etc.
U.S. Naval School, Pre-Flight, Pensa-
cola, Fla., needs a Linguist, GS-9, with
a B.A. or M.A. and proficiency in at
least two foreign languages to instruct
allied pilot training students.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

OrganizationI
Notices
Use of this column is restricted to
OFFICIALLY REGISTERED student or-
ganizations. Registration forms are
available in the Office of Student Af-
fairs, 1020 Administration Building.
Registration for the current semester
should be completed not later than
March 2.
Co-recreational Badminton Club,
meeting, Feb. 19 and 20, 7-9 p.m., Bar-
bour Gym. Bring your own shuttle-
cocks.
Debate Team, meeting, Feb. 19, 7:30
p.m., 4203 Angell Hall.
Deutscher Verei, Kaffeestunde, Feb.
20, 3:30-5 p.m., Union, South Cafeteria.
Kappa Phi and Wesley, morning wor-
ship, Feb. 20, 7:30 am., First Metho-
dist Church Chapel.
Spring Weekend, special events house
representatives meeting, Feb. 19, 7:00
p.m. League.

NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE
BRIDGE TOURNAMENT
All Undergrads Eligible
All-Campus Fraternity, Sorority,
Residence Hall Competition
Prizes for Winning Individuals and Their Houses
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 7:30 P.M.
UNION

*I

r

U

OF IDEAS-Prof. H. Richard Blackwell, director of the
ersity's Vision Research Laboratories, directs his research
aflfic safety problems.

Once-inuma-mIletimeNALE!
WONDERFUL DRESSES
For Informal Wear
For Bridesmaids . .
Ak For Brides . . .

t

ns. The stopping distance
m.p.h. is approximately 100
e explains. If a pedestrian
s under bright lights with-
at distance, a driver can
hitting him. However, if he
on low beam illumination
Don, the pedestrian would
be spotted in time.
affable vision psychologist
eveloped many safety ideas
his 11 year tenure at the
ch laboratories.
ng his ideas is that of a
-type warning light de-
for use in passing another
obile. He points out that
warning system would be
ally effective on Michigan's
ag, three-lane highways.
the situation is now, with

two cars coming toward a third=
car on a curving stretch of road,
the driver of the third car can-
not tell whether one of the oppos-
ing 'cars is behind or beside the
other.
Prof. Blackwell points out that
if such a driver pulls around traf-
fic in front of him and into the
passing lane, he is taking a
chance on whether that lane is
occupied or not.
A small, flashing, fairly dim
light is the type recommended by
the vision expert. He suggests that
the light be just bright enough
so that the car being passed and
the cars coming from the oppo-
site direction can see it. "A flash-
ing light is most easily discern-
ible."

LOUIE,
THE LOUSE

-. ; 9
*,I ob
(C -

rrnc*r t crr..% i a'nrr.

FIRST L ESSON FREE
HORTHANDj TONIGHT AT 8
fi wEEsV4% . .
YPING OPJTON A
Over 400 Schools in U.S. will assist you in review or placement.
Uses ABCs Nights 12 to 14 Weeks
AMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State & Williams Sts.

He strolled through a keyhole into my house
A dignified, well-bred upper-class louse;
He smiled ina most superior way
And said, "Man has just about seen his day.
If you'll take my advice for what it's worth
Treat insects nice, they'll inherit the earth!
Try to be beyond reproach
In youridealings with the roach ...
Bedbugs, ants and spiders, too.
Don't forget... WE'RE WATCHING YOU!"
MORAL: Well . .. until Louie takes
over, take your pleasure BIG. Smoke
Chesterfield. . . and smoke for real!
Packed more smoothly by
ACCU"-RAY, it's the smoothest
tasting smoke today.
Smoke for real ... smoke Chesterfield!
$50 for every philosophical verse acceped for publica-
tion. Chetr/jeW, P.O. Box 21. New York 46, N.Y.
a Uuisstt AMms .Tobweeo Co.

/tr " f $
fLf 1
r.
t ..

This is a sale that could happen once-in-a-life-
time! Bringing you the seasons top fashion in
dinner dresses . . . and priced at savings no
woman can resist! We bid you a royal welcome
to our greatest Fashion Event Sale! A complete
clearaway to make room for new spring dresses.
Nets -Laces -Taffetas-a-Brocades
Crystal Tones in Pastel and Darks
Originally priced from $25 to $49.95.
Now 3 groups at
$10.00, $14.98 and $25.00

Sizes 7-15, 10-20,
12% to 20V2

ON FOREST
Just off South U.

I

IL

It

Connecticut General's
Representative
will be on campus
February 25, 26
to interview Seniors
for our
Management Training Program
in
Administration,
Actuarial
or
Sales Management
See Your Placement Director for further information
about a career with Connecticut General. When you do,
make a date to discuss your future with our represen-
tative. Connecticut General Life Insurance Company,
Hartford.

....
s'
,
'. lfa
'" °$;:;;
4w; :

british boar:
tawny beauty
byJ oyce

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British boar - new tweed-loving texture in soft, wheat-toned
calfskin . . . tanned in England, Joyce-styled with
infinite care . . . into the most spirit-lifting flotties
ever to skip through summer. Top to bottom:

Pick-me-up flat
Cover leaf tie
French cuff

9.98
9.98
11.98

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