100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

kAGE TWO

i'Hlb MICHIGAN DAiLV

- --- - v--ax4. awlaaa L

U

CH ABER

MUSIC

FESTIVAL

Three Concerts in Rackham Auditorium
February 15, 16, 17, 1957

"WORLD'S FINEST" -- The Quartetto Italiano which is called
one of the world's finest string quartets will perform in Ann
Arbor in the annual Chamber Music .Festival.
Quartetto Italiano Formed
In FriendlyJam Session'

QU

RTETTO

IT~

LI

0



. Elisa Pegre ff1 Violin
Franco Rossi, Cello
SEASON TICKETS:
$3.50 and $2.50

Paolo Borciani, Vio1in
Pierro Farull, Viola
.};E^ .S. . ..EA. . . . . {?; {.g'SR:^rs::; :; . r..

One of the world's finest string-
quartets, the Quartetto Italiano
was formed through a friendly,
impromptu "jam session" in a
musician's home.
The chamber music ensemble is
a post-war product which began in
the home of violinist Paolo Bor-
ciani. Borciani and his three visi-
tors Elisa Pegreffi, violinist, Fran-
co Rossi, cellist and Pierro Farulli,
violinist sat down and began to
play quartets.
Their unity of style and execu-
tion made them decide to organize
a permanent quartet.
New Standard
Their success was instantaneous.
There are, of course, very sound
and musical reasons for such an
overwhelming public acceptance.
The Quartetto Italiano introduced
a new standard of perfection to
quartet playing which includes the
performance of complete programs
entirely from memory.
The four young Italians think,
understand and execute their
scores as one, achieving a unity of
chamber music.
The Quartet naturally began by
taking minor engagements. They
gave their first concert in the
village of Capri, in the province of
Modena, and were immediately re-
engaged. They accepted engage-
ments, regardless of the size of
the fees, finally reaching Milan,
where their debut won an ovation,
a return engagement and started
them on the road to recognition.
Conquered Italy
First they conquered Italy, then
in rapid succession Spain, Portu-
gal, Switzerland, France, Holland,
Scandinavia, Austria and Ger-
many, finally came to England
where their popularity is such that
they have made fourteen tours.
The Quartetto' Italian returns
f or its fourth American tour in
Janury 1957. Since its first Ameri-
can tour in 1951, the Quartetto
because of its purity of tone, its
perfect ensemble and its flawless
intonation have enjoyed a fantas-
tic success.
Music Critics
Muiccrtis ftn indidfi

music ensemble plays its programs
entirely from memory. The music,
instead of being printed on a
score on a music stand before the
musician, lies in the artists' head
and heart and fingers.
The members of the Quartetto
Italiano do not find it necessary to
concentrate on notes before them
but express the emotion and in-
spiration of the moment. Each
interpretation is fresh and reveals
a spontaneity that is exciting in
its intensity and feeling.
The musicians making up the
quartet are first of all, very serious
and very intent when it comes to
music ,and. perfecting their per-
formances. Yet true to artistic
tradition they love life, relaxation
and culture.
Program Features
Among the selections which will
be performed in the Ann Arbor
series of concerts are Vitali's Cap-
riccio, Neri's Sonata and Quartet
No. 2 in F major by Prokofieff.
Also to be performed in the first
cocert of the Chamber Music
Festival is Beethoven's Quartet in
E-flat major.
The second concert of the Cham-
ber Music series to be held Febru-
ary 16 will feature Quartet in D
minor by Haydn, Valentino Buc-
chi's Quartet and Quartet in G
minor by Debussy.
The concluding Sunday after-'
noon concert will feature Giar-
dini's Quartet in C minor, the'
Quartet in D minor by Mozart and"
Schubert's Quartet in C major.
Note Claimed
By Orchestra
Two members of the Cincinnati
Symphony Orchestra, which will
give a concert on February 26, are
related to famous musicians of the
last century.
A command performance at the
Russian royal court-at the behest
of theCzar, was given by another
member of the Symphony Orches-
tra while concertizing in Europe.
These highlights pin-point the
colorful background which con-
stitutes the composite of the Sym-,
Phony.
Kurt Baum Called;
Marathon Singer
Kurt Baum, Metropolitan Opera
tenor who will appear here Octo-
ber 4 is a marathon singer. It isn't
usual for a star to appear in two
operas the same day, but Baum,
did it. The works were the favorite1
twins of opera, "Cavalleria Rusti-
cana" and "Pagliacci". The tenor
sang both taxing roles brilliantly
in the double bill - and with af
cold too.I

Metropolitan
Opera Star
To Perform
The Metropolitan Opera Star
Herva Nelli, will initiate the Uni-
versity's Choral Union Music series
Oct. 4 at Hill Auditorium.
The Italian-American soprano
holds a distinguished position
among the singers of this day as
"The Toscanini Soprano." For
many years, Miss Nelli has been
the personal choice of Arturo Tos-
canini as leading soprano in his
operatic performances with the
NBC Symphony.
The "unbeatable combination" is
perpetuated on recordings, some of
which are "Otello," "Falstaff," and
Verdf's "Requiem."
Born in Italy
Born in Florence, Italy, the
soprano came with her parents to
this country at the age of twelve.
Her native instinct for singing was
refined and perfected at the Pitts-
burgh Musical Institute
In 1947 Miss Nelli was recom-
mended to Toscanini as a possible
Desdamona for his broadcastof
"Otello." Miss Nelli was given the
job after more than a score of
noted sopranos had been rejected.
The soprano joined the Metro-
politan Opera Company in a debut
as Aida which was called one of
the outstanding first performances
of the season. Since that time, the
prima donna has been guest artist
with the foremost American or-
chestras such as the Boston Sym-
phony, the New York Philhar-
monic and the Philadelphia Or-
chestra,
Operatic Series
Back in 1949 Miss Nelli was re-
introduced to the land of her birth
in an operatic series under the
baton of Maestro Toscanini. Facing
the acid test of acceptance at
Milan's famed La Scala, Miss Nelli
proved that an American can satis-
fy the most sophisticated Italian
public. Her success there was so
unmistakable that her guest stint
with La Scala was increased from
four performances to eight and
she was invited to return the fol-
lowing season.
To one who commends on the
glamour of a singing career, Nelli
answers, "Yes there is glamour
and excitement of a performance,
either on the operatic stage with
the lights and the prompter stand-
ing in his box at your feet and the
conductor looming out of the
gloom, and there is glamour and
excitement in going out on a con-
cert stage' with all those friendly
faces and giving all those wonder-
ful pleasure through a God-given
gift that you happen to have. But
it is mostly hard work. It doesn't
have to be glass cutting! One will
do any honest work to make it
possible to sing."
May Festival
Concert Plans
The 64th annual May Festival
will be presented in Ann Arbor
May 2, 3, 4 and 5 under the aus-.
pices of the University Musical
Society.
Six concerts have been planned
for the annual spring festival
which is held at Hill Auditorium.
Among scheduled performers in
the spring series are Eugene Or-
mandy conducting the Philadel-
phia , Orchestra, the University
Choral Union with Thor Johnson
guest conducting and the Festival
Youth Chores under the direction
of Geneva Nelson. Soloists are to
be announced at a later date.

Orchestra has appeared in Ann
Arbor in past years during the
Festival season.
Eighty-four concerts in Phila.
delphia and 62 performances in
25 other American cities were per-
formed by the orchestra in the
1954-55 concert series.

4

1,

t

e

r

SINGLE CONCERTS

$1.75 and $1

.25

F:

! * .}yy A? "." r; vn" ; ".~ 1 *'A vrr."" . v.. .A.
.."VS....iAV~W.M WW ...s' * " A... ..aii~r. ..V asa;..wAP": "a..

- cult to believe that the chambe

r

j

" !
1

1

=ESS

--

N

1V
4

TS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 at 8:30; and SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2

at 2:30

a

1

Eunice Alberts

Adele Addison

Lester McCoy

Howard Jarratt

Kenneth Smith

Tickets On Sale
at Burton Tower Now!
CHORAL UNION SERIES-SEASON TICKETS:
$17.00-Block A. Few remaining UNCLAIMED seats in the three
center sections on both Main Floor and in First Balcony, front
and rear.
$14.00-Block B. Two side sections on both Main Floor and in First
Balcony, front to rear.
$12.00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$10.00-Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13 rows.
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES - SEASON TICKETS:
$ 8.50-Block A. Three center sections on both Main Floor and in
First Balcony, front to rear.
$ 7.00-Block B. Two side sections on both Main Floor and in First
Balcony, front to rear.
$ 6.00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$ 5.00-Block D. Top Balcony, rear 13 rows.

Performers:
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

ADELE ,ADDISON, Soprano
EUNICE ALBERTS, Contralto

KENNETH SMITH, Bass
MUSICAL SOCIETY ORCHESTRA

I

F

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan