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September 20, 1956 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-20

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PAGE TWENTY

THE MCMGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 20_ 1959

WAGE TWE TY HE M CI~IGA DAI Y T TIR~flA ~F T!~ J~' 90lOK

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the
tradition
that is
MICH IGAN
is
fine
performance

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Ta lo r
(Continued from Page 19)

Criti cizes

Educators

ceased to exist except for the nos-
talgic, you turn inside."
There is a whine and a whimper
in the tone of this remark. "All
large ideashave ceased to exist?"
What about the idea of freedom?
Isn't it large and isn't it what a
large part of the world conflict is
about? Isn't it real? What about
truth? What aboutJ ustice? What
about equality? These are large
ideas, theyhare the ones which
represent the heart of contem-
porary struggle and change in
America and everywhere else.
If this generation is playing it

safe and has turned inwards and
away from conflict, it has been
taught to do so by its adult
leaders.
. * *
Caution to Bravery . .
THE REAL question is, What
can we do to change the, mood
from caution to bravery, from
conformity to independence, from
suspicion to confidence?
I believe that it is here that the
student has a very great chance
not to be quiet but to act with in-
dependence and vigor. Often it
is said that there are fewer op-
portunities these days for break-

ing new frontiers, and that this
too is a reason for the new conser-
vatism in youth. But look at some
of these new frontiers:
I have mentioned education and
the teacher - the reform of edu-
cation. We are at the beginning
of what amounts to a cultural
revolution in which we see the
possibilities of a country in which
every child born from now on will
have a chance to receive the edu-
cation his talents deserve. We can
see a completely new era for Am-
erican culture and the arts. The
frontier is wide open for imagina-
tive and forceful ideas to come in,
and there are more students in-

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quality and
fine performance
is our
tradition, too!
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terested in education than ever blacklisting in the radio and tele-
before. vision industry was called before
The matter of social equality Congress to be cross-examined
has a whole new frontier on which about the material in his re-
to work. Here the American stu- search; when we think about these
dent has a wide open opportunity things, we realize that somewhere
and an enticing obligation. The in this country an opposition
problem of the Negro student is movement needs to start in okder
the problem of all students, the to return sanity to the cultural
Negro's problem is an extreme policies of our Government.
form of the one which everyone These are matters of great con-
has. cern to the universities. Such an
The Negro has less educational opposition movement can start in
opportunity than the white man. the universities and colleges since
The Negro child born in Scars- it is of concern to them more than
dale has more than one born in to any other part of the country's
Georgia. The poor white man has life.
less opportunity than the wealthy If the cultural programs of the
white man. The child of a happy United States are to be run ac-
and interesting falnily has more cording to the accusations of ma-
opportunity than one from a bro- licious and uninformed men, the
ken home, contribution of the United States
We know that potential intelli- to world culture wlil quickly qe-
gence has never been less in the cline. This is something in which
Negro than in the white, and it students have a natural interest--
has always been absurd to think the freedom of the artist and the
otherwise. But the Negro's oppor- intellectual from the control of
tunity for developing and using his government.
what he has been denied and is
still being denied. Hundreds of
thosuands of white children have Creative Arts , . .
been in the same situation for the I WOULD like to point out an-
past years. To be intelligent the other area of large idea in which
child must want to be intelligent,
he must have materials and situa- a frontier exists-the area of the
tions to be intelligent about, he creative arts. It is true that the In-
must have motivations and en- terests of students have moved
mustraemomiatios aunden-more towards personal and philo-
him to makementhirom wish tose go ahearound sophical questions than towards
with learning. If we put the young practical social issues in the last
child, white or black, iftto situa- few years. There is no reason why
tions where he feels free, encour- they shouldn't. But when we con-
aged and wanted, where he can sider the question of where new
look every man in the eye, we can works of art may emerge in the
then hope to unleash the force of future, we look away from the
his intelligence. Broadway commercial theater
What is needed is the will and which is esthedtically bankrupt,
the humanity to support the cause away from the commercial pro-
of Negro equality, and to find ductions of the mass media, and
ways in which the Negro child can toward new talents to be found
find his place in white schools in the universities and colleges.
and in white society, not as an There are more students who
uninvited guest, but as a welcome write, paint, sculpt, compose and
friend. The Negro and the white work directly in the creative arts
should be educated together not than at any other time in our
simply because it is the Negro's educational history. Here again is
right, but because each has some- a frontier - and the college is a
thing precious to give the other, place where experiments in the
and each is the poorer without it. creative arts may take place in
The colleges and universities have profusion and provide a new
a primary role to play in bringing source for the cultural future of
about that equality. the United States.

3

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.e

Th~iere is aso the field of in-
ternational aid, the need for
young Americans who can help the
new Asiatic countries to establish
themselves, the need for those
who can help in America within
the problem of juvenile delin-
quency, the need for liberally-
educated scientists to work at the
outer edge of modern research.
The frontiers stretch ahead of
everyone, they are there for those
who wish to go out that far.
I have said enough to indicate
that I think students in America
have an open future ahead of
them, that they have a special
place in American society. I have
given what private instruction I
can.
It remains only to say that you
have the trust and confidence of
the .American public. You are
looked to abroad for leadership
and help. You do genuinely repre-
sent the student in America. I
count it a privilege to be able to
say to you that people like myself
believe in you more than in al-
most anything else.

xI

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