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September 20, 1956 - Image 15

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-20

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIFTEEN

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVTEEN

"N"VA"IV d11l ~Y l N ~

r LD

Appointments Announced
To Museum of Art, ERI

The appointment of Charles H.
Sawyer of Yale University as di-
rector of The University Museum
of Art was announced Monday by
President Harlan Hatcher.
Sawyer has also been appointed
professor of Art in the College of
Architecture and Design and pro-
fessor of Fine Arts in the College
of Literature, Science and the
Arts. His appointments are effec-
tive at the beginning of the sec-
and semester.
Professor Sawyer has been dean
of the Yale University School of
Architecture and Design since
1947. In that position he was re-
sponsible for coordinating Yale's
resources in the arts and develop-
ing an arts program for under-
graduates as well as profssional
students in architecture, city plan-
ning, painting, sculpture and the
graphic arts.
At the University, Professor
1 Sawyer will succeed Prof. Jean
Paul Slusser, who became director
of the Museum of Art in 1947, aft-
er serving as acting director. Pro-
fessor Slusser retired this past
June.
R * *
A mathematician with research
Science News
Impressions
To Be Studied
America's tastes in science news
writing will be examined by the
* Survey Research Center in a $60,-
000 study financed by the Rocke-
feller Foundation.
The survey will be conducted
under the joint auspices of New
York University and the National
Association of Science Writers. It
will sample public opinion of
science news reporting in several
mass media-newspapers, maga-
zines, radio and television. Nation-
wide random sampling techniques
developed by the Survey Research
Center will be used to secure data.
In addition, the study will de-
velop comparisons between idi-
vidual attitudes toward science
and scientists and reaction to the
content format and media for
reporting science news.
Results are expected by the end
of 1957.
Museum Rebuilds
Egyptian Room
A reconstruction of a room from
an ancient Egyptian tomb from
carved limestone blocks loaned by
the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
N. Y., has been arranged by the
staff of the Kelsey Museum of
Archaeology.
Reconstructed around the re-
maining original blocks, the tomb
has a modern ceiling painted blue
with gold stars and border of lotus
flowers and buds. The wall in-
cludes a door frame or portal lead-
ing into an inner chamber.
The carved limestone blocks are
from the walls of the tomb of
Bak-en-ran-ef at Saqqara. Bak-
en-ran-ef lived about 2,500 years
ago during the reign of Psamtik I
of the 26th Egyptian Dynasty
(633-609 B. C.) He was vizier and
governor of the capitol city of
Egypt which at that time was
Memphis.

and administrative experience in
a variety of technical fields has
begun work as associate director of
the University's Engineering Re-
search Institute.
He is Merrill M. Flood, former
professor of industrial and man-
agement engineering and director
of the Institute for Research in
the Management of Industrial
Production at Columbia Univer-
sity, New York City.
Flood will direct E.R.I. activi-
ties at the Willow Run Labora-
tories, site of the multi-million
dollar Project Michigan and other
research programs. In addition, he
holds an appointment as profes-
sor of industrial engineering in
the College of Engin~eering.
As a director of three Princeton
units, Flood and his associates
pioneered in operations research
and weapons-systems evaluation,
and also completed field trials of
the first electronic anti-aircraft
artillery fire control equipment
Just before Pearl Harbor.
Serving as the chief civilian
scientist with the Research and
Development Division of the War
Department General Staff after
the war, he continually reviewed
overall strategic plans to ensure
that the Army's research and de-
velopment kept pace with defense
needs.

Exhibition
Features
G. B.Shaw
The current exhibit in the main
corridor of the General Library
commemorates the centenary of
the birth of George Bernard Shaw,
grand old man of contemporary
English literature. Shaw died in
1950.
Among the items of Shaviana in-
cluded in the exhibit are several
Shaw letters given to the Library
as a part of the theatrical collec-
tion of Maurice Browne and Ellen
Van Valkenburg; Shaw's applica-
tion for membership in The Shake-
speare Association, with its typi-
cal comment; and volumes of let-
ters to actresses Ellen Terry and
Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
There are also numerous photo-
graphs and caricatures of the au-
thor and his friends; modern ar-
ticles celebrating the centenary; a
copy of the "Last Will and Test-
ment" printed by the Apple Tree
Press, Flint, and edited by William
Chase, at one time a member of
the University's English Depart-
ment.
Also included are two biograph-
ical works by Shaw himself-"Six-
teen Self-Sketches," published in
1949, and the "Rhyming Picture
Guide to Ayot St. Lawrence,"
(Shaw's home), published in 1950;
and the 1911 edition of Archibald
Henderson's "official" biography,
now just announced for publica-
tion in its definitive edition.

Married
Enrollment
Tops 5,000
There will be more than 5,000
married students attending classes
this fall at the University officials
estimate.
This will almost be a quarter of
the record total enrollment of over
22,000 expected this September.
Last year there were 4,466 mar-
ried students, an increase of 994
over the 1954-55 school year figure
of 3,472, with the expected increase
of students, officials estimate that
the figure should go over the 5,000
mark.
The University Terraces on the
northeast end of campus house
276 of the married students and
the new North Campus develop-
ment, Northwood Apartments, will
house 396. One-hundred of these
apartments were opened last year
and the other 296 will open this
fall. A small number of these
apartments are used for faculty
residences.
The remaining married students
live in homes, apartments, and
trailers in and around the city of
Ann Arbor.
The North Campus develope-
ment will make available one-bed-
room apartments for $85 and two-
bedroom apartments for $100 rent.
This price includes all utilities. The
apartments are furnished except
for the second bedroom in the two-
bedroom dwellings.
Each group of buildings will
have its own parking lot and util-
ity building, which will include
laundry facilities and lockers for
storage by the tenants. Electricity,
water and heating will also be cen-
tered in these buildings.
University bus service every hour
between North Campus and main
campus and a post office with mail
boxes for each apartment are pro-
vided for the residents.
Total construction cost of the
new apartments is approximately
$4,760,400.

1956-57
UNIVERSITY MUSIC SOCIETY'

CO

C E RTS

Seventy-eighth Annual Choral Union Series
KURT BAUM, Tenor and HERVA NELLI, Soprano
*.*. ...*..*. Thursday,October4

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor

Monday,

October

15

BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Sunday, October 21
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Conductor

ROBERT CASADESUS, Pianist

Monday, November 5

cU' Received Grant For Study
Relating to New Observatory

VIENNA PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

AN DRE CL UYTENS, Conductor .
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist.
VIENNA CHOIR BOYS .

Tuesday, November 20
Monday, January 14

A $545,000 grant has been made
to the University for the support
of studies leading to the estab-
lishment of an optical astronomy
observatory, according to a Na-
tional Science Foundation an-
nouncement.
The studies, under the direction
of Robert R. McMath, director of
McMath-Hulbert Observatory, are
a continuation of work undertaken
last year by the University under
previous grants from the National
Science Foundation totaling $300,-
000.
The establishment of the optical
astronomy observatory, which will
include initially a 36-inch tele-
scope, is part of the Foundation's
over-all program in support of
basic research in astronomy. The
Foundation recently announced
that a radio astronomy facility
would be ercted at Green Bank,
West Virginia, at an. approximate
cost of $30,000 for a study leading
to the erection of a solar telescope.
Data Gathered Slowly
Grants by the National Science
Foundation for astronomical fa-
cilities climax approximately five
years of deliberations by American
astronomers on needs in their field.
According to Professor McMath,
"The problems of astronomy re-
quire a wealth of basic data. At
the present time such data are be-
ing gathered very slowly. Because
of this slow rate fundamental ad-
vances occur rarely, only about
once in 25 years."
Facilities Lacking
The National Science Founda-
tion's decision to request funds
from Congress for the establish-
ment of large-scale astronomy fa-
cilities stems from the growing
concern on the part of American
astronomers over the lack of fa-
cilities freely available to astron-
omers generally. All of the large-
scale observatories in the United
States are privately owned and op-
erated and are available to visiting
astronomers on a limited basis
only.
The furtherance of education in
astronomy is another compelling
reason forthe establishment of
such facilities. It is hoped that the

existence of these facilities will en-
courage young astronomers to go
into teaching by giving assurance
that they will not have to forfeit
research opportunities in so doing.

. Sunday,

January 20

SOLOMON, Pianist

Thursday, February 21

I U

CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor . . . Tuesday, February 26

what will you have?

Champions
~i
. tm
umm C
u wCUlSHONEDE
-N

THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor

Sunday,

March 10

SEASON TICKETS:
B, $14.00; Block C,

Remaining unclaimed seats
$12.00; Block D, $10.00.

in Block A, $17.00; Block
NOW ON SALE.

Eleventh Annual Extra Concert Series

MANTOVANI and His New Music.
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Thursday, October 11

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
ELISABETH SCHWARZKOPF,

Wednesday, October 17

. .

. .

WHITE
CHARCOAL
NAVY
CHINO
RED

THIS BLUE KEDS LABEL STAMPS
THE SHOE OF CHAMPIONS
Sizes 3 to 1...Nor M

dePAUR OPERA GALA .
LEONARD dePAUR, Conductor
BOSTON POPS ORCHESTRA
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor

Soprano
Wednesday, November 14
Thursday, January 10
. . . . Sunday, March 3

$395

Subscribe
to The
Michigan Daily

Ran o [[A
306 SOUTH STATE

SEASON TICKETS: Block A, $8.50; Block B, $7.00; Block C, $6.00; Block
D, $5.00. NOW ON SALE.
Annual Christmas Concerts

MESSIAH (Handel)

December

1

and 2, 1956

. .

a
1
1
{
.

I

ADELE ADDISON, Soprano
EUNICE ALBERTS, Contralto
HOWARD JARRATT, Tenor

Books and
+MEDICINE_
+ DENTISTRY
" NURSING
+ PUBLIC
WIAI TI-

Supplies
Our store is specially
equipped to fill your every
need and a well
informed staff including
MEDICAL and DENTAL'
students will serve you.

TICKETS: 75c and 50c (either Concert). On sale beginning October 15.
Seventeenth Annual Chamber Music Festival

KENNETH SMITH, Bass
CHORAL UNION and ORCHESTRA
LESTER McCOY, Conductor

QUARTETTO ITALIANO
PAOLO BORCIANI, Violin
ELISA PEGREFFI, Violin

. .

. February 15, 16, 17, 1957
PIERO FARULLI, Viola
FRANCO ROSSI. Cello

SEASON TICKKETS:

$3.50 and $2.50.

On sale beginning

October

15.

Sixty-Fourth Annual May Festival

SIX CONCERTS

May 2, 3, 4, 5,

1957

. s . .

. .

The Philadelphia Orchestra, EUGENE ORMANDY, Conc
CA AI"T"LI A --- .- - t ..-- l,,. . 1 _ . ..,.. - . : t i_ _. _ 1 I-:-_ -

ductor. WILLIAM
-r"un/\~ae/s inkienk l

I

I

I

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