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January 05, 1957 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UATT7.

fJ!i 1 ' V U11F

JNACADEMIC' APPROACH:
Visiting Lecturer. Gains Student Praise
By ALLAN STILLWAGON_
If the old adage "a teacher's
eatest honor is the praise of
is students" can be counted true,
F. Powers is a. highly honored
tan.

"J. F. Powers taught me more
about writing in the last three
months than I learned in the 21
years before," one of his students I
said recently.
Powers, winding up his term as
visiting lecturer in the English
department, will return to Minne-
sota Jan. 17 and resume full-time
writing after a semester's class-
room work.
Taught Before
Teaching is not a new experi-
ence for the 39-year-old writer.
He has taught at St. John's Bene-
dictine Monastery in Minnesota
and at Marquette University.
And a return to teaching does
not mean a sharper insight into
the student personality, according
to Powers. "I'm interested only, in
the ones who give everything
they've got," he says.
"To be a good writer you've got
to work hard, and long. There
aren't too many who are willing
to do that."
"Brandy and Cigars"
Does' college writing contain
any special flaws? Definitely,
Powers says. "Too many young
'students see a good story as a
portrait of the 'good life', com-
plete with walnut paneling, bran-
dy and good cigars.
"Many beginning writers are
historical novelists, even though
they don't realize it themselves.
Anyone who leaves, a farm in In-
diana and trys to turn out snappy
Parisian scenes might just as well
be writing about the French revo-
lution. They couldn't be farther
away from their own home
ground."
Gives Sharp Criticism
Powers' criticism is described .by
his students as "sharp, unhesi-
tant, cutting if necessary." The
ones' who have stuck with him
seem to like it, and claim to thrive
on it.
Others, like a local prodigy ,who
had been acclaimed by others but
who was 'upbraided by the visitor
for his sex, hunger and bad wine
theme's, carefully avoid all con-
tact.
college
Roundup
By. ROBERT JUNKER
Displaced Hungarian college
students may be given the oppor-
tunity to attend the University of
Colorado next fall free of charge,
according to the Colorado Daily.
Greek Combine, the association
of sororities and fraternities on
the Colorado campus, is working
on the refugee program.
Students will be given ro6m and
board jobs in Greek houses on
campus for the remainder of their
college careers, and the University
has agreed to waive tuition for all
Hungarian students on this pro-
gram.
The University of Mississippi
has formulated a program to
bring. two Hungarian students to
campus next semester for a full
four-year education.
The Mississippian, cam-
pus newspaper, reports that ef-
forts are underway to raise $14,-
000 to pay the students' way
through the university.
Silence reigns in the University
of Colorado juke boxes as the si-
lent record fad hit campus.
Three minutes of silence is an-
nounced by a soft voice or a
whooping Indian, depending on
the juke box involved, and peace
and quiet reign in the grills as the
records play. All this costs but
one dime.
The Committee for Occasional
Silence had the records placed in

juke boxes "so students and pro-
fessors could ponder philosophi-
cal problems in silence when the
record is playing."

Educational
Scope Said
Too Narrow
A new breed of "super-scien-
tists" is needed to cope with the
tremendous advances of the atom-
ic age and a new educational phil-
osophy is required for their train-j
ing, Roger Leatherman, assistant
director of the Phoenix Project,!
said last week.
Leatherman, addressing a meet-
ing of the National Association
of Biology Teachers, warned that
scientific knowledge is accumu-
lating so rapidly, and will grow
so fast in years ahead, that scien-
tists of unusual scope are needed,

500,000 U.S. WELLS:
Present Oil Reserves
A ssures Ample Supply

By iAVID L. BOWENi The amount of oil located but
Associated Press Newsfeatulres Writer Teaon follctdbt
still in the ground waiting to be1
Whatever else happens in the tapped is a nation's proved re-
Middle East, the United States serve. Despite the fact that Amer-
can breathe easy for the time be- icans are far and away the world's;
ing about its own oil supply. greatest users of oil, the U.S. oil
For the immediate future, there industry has kept ahead of in-
is plenty of oil underground1 in the creasing demand for petroleum
United States and the facilities products.

Prof. Charles Fries, of the Eng-
lish department, will travel to
the University of Australia this
month to direct a seminar on
language teaching-for 20 South-
east Asian nations.
Members of the approximately
40 man group, selected by minis-
tries of education from the coun-
try each represents, will meet at
the end of the month for daily
sessions to discuss the problems
of teaching English as a foreign
language.
The seminar will last for ap-

Language Exploratory commit-
tee to develop further and apply
practically in Japan recent de-
velopments in linguistic science.
Before returning to the tJniver-
sity, he will visit Thailand and
the Philippines where special
programs are in progress for the
development of teaching materials
adapted to the linguistic and so-
cial-cultural background of the
.ountries.

1

SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1957
Fries To Teach in Australia
Under UNESCO Program

POWERS PROBES-"Too ma:
cirgling round apd round in an
chance on coming down, even
say about where they land."
A major fault of youthful prose
is descr-ibed by the recent "New
Yorker" contributer as caused b
a faulty impression of the profes
sional author.
Writers Are Nuts
"The kids think all writers ar
nuts, that we're -drunks and we
beat our wives," he said. "So the,
write accordingly."
His personal approach to teach
ing is "unacademic," a ,tern
somehow paralleling "refreshing'
in the mind of a student. "But7
do try to analyze," Powers says
"A good story isn't good withou
a reason. It can be taken apar
and studied, as if in chemistry.
Power's decision to write shcr
stories instead of in somp othe
form has no real significance. h
says. "But a novel should com
next: I've been working on it fo
a couple of years.
Above Average
"On the other hand, I wouldn'
want to bet on it," he grinned.
The past semester has been
pleasant one, the author o
"Lions, Harts, Leaping Does" re
ports. "The students are abov
average: I haven't been presse
for time, and I've been free to d
some of my own work.
"And there's always Austi
Warren's apartment, where I go
a chance to read the things I'v
been wanting to read for years.
(Prof. Warren's apartment wa
once described by a colleague a
"a wall of books times 50.")
Even in the last days of. hi
term J. F. Powers doesn't restric
advice to the classroom. His wor
to reporters, delivered with a lev
el gaze and a straight face, is "i
it isn't true, don't write it."

f{to interpret and direct it. ^
Too Much Work
1 ;"The scientist we are looking
for is gs much a philosopher as
a scientist," Leatherman said; "A
man who can organize and work
with people. a humanitarian cap-
-Daily-David Arnold able of extracting from his science
ny people are up in the clouds, the information the world needs,
airplane.They're afraid to take a who feels at home in a half a
if it means having something to dozen disciplines and, finally, has
the ability to explain results to
the populace in language it can
e understand."
t 'Iifg G l jgrjfn gBecause it is now possible to at-
yI U tack and solve thousands of var-
- i r Be- H eldlied problems, he said, the scien-
tist of tomorrow must be trained
to sift out and devote his efforts
School of Education will spon- to, the most important research
sor the seventh annual Mathe- problems.
e matics Education Conference at The old concept that a scientist
y the University next Saturday. is free to pursue any narrow or
Prof. Phillip S. Jones of the relatively unimportant problem
mathematics department will pre- that strikes his fancy must be dis-
h side at the meeting of 700 high carded, Leatherman declared, for
school. math teachers and their there .is too much work of real
I stude'nts. value to be done.
. The day's program will open Education Lacking
t with a panel discussion of newE t a
t courses and academic, require- This, he said, does not mean
ments. that there should be no "pure"
t ' The remainder of the day will or fundamentaldresearch. A set
r be devoted to speeches and group of general, predictive rules should
e meetings related to the field of! be worked out to give research
e mathematics. A tour of the cam- I proper direction.
r pus for the students and teach- The major problem, according
ers has been planned by the Un- to Leatherman, is that today's
dergraduate Mathematics Club. It educational system is not good
t will highlight the mathematical enough to train the super-scien-
activities at the University. tists required.
a
e
d .
o HE
n
e ANN ARBOR CIVIC T
is
i presents
s
d
7-
if

necessary to refine it.
The United Skates has roughly
a half-million wells producing oil
in 29 of the 48 states. In 1955, the
nation's total output was almost
two and a half billion barrels of
crude oil.
- Texas Tops
Texas is by far the country's
biggest producer, accounting for
over a billion barrels per year.
California is another productioni
giant. These two leaders are fol-
lowed by Louisiana, Oklahoma
and Kansas.
According to the American Pet-
roleum Institute, the nation's re-
fining capacity currently amounts
to 8,560,000 barrels daily. Under;
construction are additional facil-
ities which are expected to boost
this figure by 200,000 barrels daily
by the end of last year.
Will Stabilize
In recent weeks, refining runs
have been averaging about 8,150,-
000 barrels daily but this figure
is dropping and probably soon will
stabilize around eight million bar-
rels daily.
The amount of' crude oil pro-
duced and the capacity to refine
it is only one side of a nation's
oil health. Even more important
in the long run is the quantity of
its reserves, for oil is a "one-har-
vest" crop. Once a field is ex-
hausted, drlilers must move to
another one.
Steilfeld Music
Student and faculty members
of the School of Music will pre-
sent a concert of selections from
the Stellfeld Music Library at
8:30 p.m. Jan. 13 in Aud. A, Angell
Hall.

Finding More
Oil men are consistently find-'
ing more oil than the wells pump
every year, even though the
search is becoming more and
more difficult.
Proved reserves of liquid petro-
leum for the entire United States
now amount to almost 35112 bil-
lion barrels - slightly more than
14 times current annual produc-
tion. This gives the United States
a sizable cushion.
However, oil consumption is
rising steadily. In the long haul
it is entirely possible that Ameri-
can industry will have to look
elsewhere for a big part of its
crude.

proximately one month and is
sponsored by the United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cul-
tural Organization. Prof. Fries,
who will be on leave from the
University, noted that English has
an "extremely significant and im-
portant place in the social and
political affairs of these 20 na-
tions."
After leaving Australia, Prof.
Fries will return to Tokyo to con-
tinue working on the English

OrganizationI
i Notices
Graduate Outing Club, hike and sup-
per, 2 p.m., Sunday. Rackham Build-
ing.
* 4' *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, meet-
ing, 4 p.m. Sunday, Lane -Hall, speak-
er: Rev. Donald MacLennan, "Abiding
in Christ." *
Unitarian Student Group, meeting,
7 p.m., Sunday, First Unitarian Church,
speaker: Dr. Hunter, "Current Re-
search on Cancer".

A

Come

to ChjNurch

Sunday

I

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
1 0:15A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service,
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at the Canter-
bury House.,
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5-6 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper.
8:00 P.M. Epiphany light service. Preacher the
Very Rev. Sidney Sweet, retired dean of the
Cathedral of St. Louis.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10.45 A.M. Meetings for Worship.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends Meeting

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Chem, or Chem. E. and two or more
years of experience in the field of ad-
hesives and/or high polymers develop-
ment.
Comstock Foods, Inc., Newark, N.Y.,
is interested in an Engineering gradu-
tae with a degree in Mech., Civil, or
Chem. E.
Lockheed Aircraft Corp., Sunnyvale,
California, is offering a work and study
program in conjunction with the Univ.
of Calif., the Univ. of Southern Calif.,
and Stanford University. to enable
graduates in Math., Engrg., and Science
to gain industrial .experience and earn
a salary while working towards a
Master of Science or PhD degree.
H." J. Heinz Co., Holland, Mich.,
needs men and women with degrees
in Bacteriology, either new graduates
or alumni.
Ford Motor C.o, Ypslianti, Michigan.
has openings for .,Stenographers and
Typists.
For further information ocntact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 371.
er e- If late dates
make you
-flunk-bai t,
And
° studying late
keeps you
second rote,
Take
No-Nods, mate I
-SAFE AS COFFEE 15 TABLETS

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West stadium
Sundays 10:00 A.M. - - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Ministers,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Hearld of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Two Morning Worship Services: 9:00 and 10:30.
'FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main St. Reading Room hours are Mon.,
11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Tues.-Sat. 11:00
A.M. to 5 P.M.; and Sun. 2:30 to 4:30 PM.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
11:00 Morning Worship. "The 1957 Church Mot-
to."
6:00 Student Guild.
7:00 Evening Service: "Cleansing From Sin."
WEDNESDAY
8:00 Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison,, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.l
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Dr. Merrill P. Abbey will
speak on "On Following Your Star."
9:30 to 10:30 A.M. Two discussion groups. "The
History of the Hebrew People" and "The Bible
and Christian Living."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Dr. Harlan
Hatcher will speak.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Guest speaker: Rev. Rob-
ert S. Bates.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD
7:00 P.M., Congregational Church. Speakers:
Sue Gillespie and Robert Bates: "How For Is
It To India?"

f
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Special

Selling!

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 Noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN
ANN ARBOR
Neer Quarters: 106 East Liberty, 9D FLOOR
Listen to: Radio Theosophy: Sundays 12:15 P.M.
W.P.A.G. (1050 kc.)
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services & Holy
Communion.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
6:00 P.M. Supper
7:00 P.M. Miss Virginia Hoelzle will show 3-D
Films of the Holy Land.
THURSDAY
9:30 P.M. Vespers

A

x

Famous Name

-

s c
Q
C
k
P

u Th4
UP!

Cashmere Sweaters
Short Sleeve Pullover were $21.95 NOW 15

Long Sleeve Pullover were $26.95
Cardigans . - . . . . . were $21.951

NOW 18
NOW 2O

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
50'2 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Louks and Mr. E. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone.
9:45 A.M. Bible Class studies First Kings.
11:00 A.M. The sermon is "Missions-Elective or
Imperative," by Rev. Day.
6:00 P.M. Guild Cabinet Meeting.
6:45 P.M. Report on United Student Christian
Council Conference in Pittsburgh.

LAST WEE
Tonight 8:15
Sun. Matinee 2:30

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips. Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "Epiphany Joys."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program, with the Wayne
State University Gamma Delta Chapter as

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FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

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