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December 19, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-19

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PACE'.SM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMA 19 1998

WAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. T)~E~Pl~vm1'1~ 10 101CR

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Foreign Students Give Plans
For Holiday Vacation Break

KIDDIES' DELIGHT:
'U' To Give Christmas TV Puppet Show Tonight
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By CAROL PRINS
Holiday plans for foreign stu-
dents are being scheduled by the
International Center.
New York City and Washington
will be toured by a group of 25
students leaving Ann Arbor Dec.
23 and returning Dec. 31. Three
days will be spent in each city
touring places of interest.
In Washington, the group will
visit Mount Vernon, the Capitol
Building, the White House, and
the National Gallery of Art.
In New York, the group will
take a bus tour of Manhattan, visit
the United Nations Building, visit
radio and TV shows, see a Broad-
way play and visit museums.
Another group from the Inter-
national Center will tour Detroit
visiting radio and TV stations and
other points of interest.
Ten foreign students will see
radio station WJR and WJBK-TVL
and the Institute of Art. The
group is limited to ten people ae-
cause of limited facilities at the
television stations.
Locally, foreign students will be
able to enjoy Christmas hospitality
in Ann Arbor homes. Students
have been invited to spend the
holiday and the weekend followingj
the holiday in the homes of towns-
people.
President and Mrs. Harlan Hat-

By DAVIM GELFAND I
The ancient art of puppeteering,1
which never dies, is being used by,
the University's Television Service
tonight for a children's Christmas
Show on Ann Arbor station
WPAG-TV.
Part of a regular series of puppet
shows using a "Kukla, Fran and
Ollie" type format, the speciall
program will feature Peggy For-
ward, '58, as story teller and Bob
Barrett, '57, and Dick De Beck,
'59, as puppeteers,
The Christmas Show has a twistj
not usually used in the puppet
not usually used in the puppeteers
regular shows. Usually Peggy starts
to tell her story and is interrupted
by Croc, Cuthbert, Pug and
Grouch, the puppets of the show,
They then go on to weave their
own story while frustrating Peggy
in her storytelling attempt.
'Christmas Spirit'
For the Christmas Show, every-
thing starts as usual, but instead'
of telling a story, the puppets slyly
get Peggy to leave for a moment.
While Peggy is gone, they try to
think up a gift for her.
One suggests a robot. Another
suggests a walking bear. A yellow
sports car and a jack-in-the-box
are also considered. But they can't
agree on a gift.
After Croc tells a story about a.
giant who grows jelly beans, the I

puppets decide to get Peggy a bag
of jelly beans. At the end, there is
a surprise for everyone, including
certain members of the Univer-
sity's television staff.
Filmed Other Show
The Forward - Barrett - DeBeck
puppet trio has also kinescoped a
Christmas show as part of the TV
Service's regular series "Accent."
"Accent" is a series of shows deal-
ing with the various activities of
several. University departments.
The kinescopes of this show will
be seen at later dates on television
stations in Saginaw and Cadillac.
The more standard format is
used. As the program begins, the
Storyteller, Miss Forward, is pre-
paring to read a children's story.
Plans Interrupted
But her plans are interrupted
by an unexpected visitor, an au-
thoritative puppet names Croco-
dilius Q. Reptilia. Croc insists on
telling his own story, and invites
three of his friends, a puppet, bear
and rabbit to join him.
After many quarrels about the
plot line, the puppets finish their
story -- and make an important
discovery about human nature.
Betty Walker, of the University's
TV staff writes the puppet show.
Production is by Larry Rosen, '57,
and direction by Ron Bornstein,
Grad.

A&D Magazine
On Sale Today
"Dimension," the architecture
and design magazine, will be sold
today, tomorrow and Saturday in
the lobby of the architecture build-
ing.
The independent student publi-
cation will include articles of art
criticism and representative art
work by students and faculty.
A graduate painting thesis on
the philosophy of art by James
Eldridge, Grad., will appear, as
well as a senior architecture thesis
by Dale Suomela, '56A&D.
"Emotional Architecture," an
article about Mathias Goeritz, a
Hungarian sculptor, now living in
Mexico, is featured. Accompanied
by illustrations of the sculptor's
work, this story coincides with
the first showing of Goeritz's art
in the United States.
Extending its scope of material
beyond' that of student art work,
"Dimension" presents ideas of
students and professors in related
fields of art. These ideas are vital
to the designer since he has to
cope with them in serving society.

PUPPETS AND PUPPETEERS-During rehearsal for the Univer-
sity's TV children's show tonight on WPAG-TV, Croc rears at the
camera while Cuthbert the rabbit notices a man with a flash
camera.

-Daily-John Hirtzel
FINISHING TOUCHES-Foreign students enter into the holiday
spirit by decorating their Christmas tree. Over the Christmas
period many students will tour large cities, while others spend
their vacation with Ann Arbor families.
cher have invited International Hatcher home.
Center students to attend an an- Another holiday season party
nual Christmas party given es- will be sponsored by the Interna-
pecially for students from other tional Center at 8 p.m. Dec. 21 in
lands at 8 p.m. Dec. 27 at the the Union Ballroom.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

TEN LEADING STORIES:
Chief Headline Events of Past Year Reviewed

---

(Continued from Page 1)
threatened with forced integra-
tion, and others passed interposi-
tion laws.
Despite the 1956 battles over
politics and segregation, the
United States enjoyed, and con-
tinues to enjoy, a period of great
prosperity.
On the international scene, how-
ever, things were far from peace-
ful.
Mideast Power Politics
Undoubtedly the top world news
story of the year was the play of
power politics in the Middle East.
Skirmishes had been going on
constantly between Israel and her
Arab neighbors, and that situa-
tion appeared critical in itself.
In July, however, the entire
world was thrown into a furor
when President Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser of Egypt suddenly national-
ized the vital Suez Canal, appar-
ently in reprisal for the Western
powers' refusal to subsidize the
building of the Aswan Dam.
The Western users of the canal,
many .of which were threatened
with economic collapse should the
flow of oil from the Mideast be
shut off, set up a Canal User's As-
sociation, with the intent of in-
ternationalizing the canal. The
Association was formed in the face
of Nasser's repeated and defiant
threats and warnings.
The crisis blew sky-high in
October and November, when Is-
rael invaded the Sinai Peninsula
and the British and French
launched an invasion of Egypt and.
the Canal Zone.
The United States and the
United Nations brought heavy.
pressure to bear on Britain and
France, eventually forcing their
withdrawal, which is still in pro-
grt-

subsequent Soviet intervention to
crush it.
The revolt began on October 24
as a peaceful demonstration in
Budapest against the presence of
Soviet troops in Hungary and the
tight Russian control of the na-
tion's affairs.
Secret police, however, fired in-
to the mob, and the revolt was un-
derway. For a time, it appeared
that the rebellion was a success,
as the rebels gained control over
much of the nationdand put Pre-
mier Imre Nagy in power.
In the meantime, the Russians
moved a huge army of troops and
arms into Hungary and opened a
full-scale operation to stamp out
the revolt. In a few days the Reds
had slaughtered many thousands
of Hungarians and regained pow-
er.
Moscow then put the present
puppet government of Janos Ka-
dar into power, and through it
tried to restore "normalcy" to the
war-torn country. Strikes and
demonstrations continued, how-
ever, and are still going on.
Poznan Riots . .
Another leading news story of
the year also took place behind
the Iron Curtain, in Poland.
On June 28, Poznan, Poland,
was the scene of the now famous
"bread and freedom" riots against
Polish subjugation to the Soviet
Union and low living standards
in the country.
The riots erupted shortly after
a small scale (by comparison with
the Hungarian revolt) uprising.

The result in this case was not so
disastrous. Poland underwent a
change of government, and ach-
ieved some measure of indepen-
dence from Moscow.
Stalinism Denounced...
An important contributing fac-
tor in these rebellions, the event
that probably made them possible,
was the February speech of Com-
munist Party leader N i k i t a
Khruschev denouncing former
Premier Josef Stalin and his poli-
cies.
The result was a move through-
out most of the communist world
toward "de-Stalinization", or the
relaxing of the iron fist in favor of
more gentle, more subtle methods
of gaining and maintaining com-
munist domination in the world.
This brought about the disso-
lution of the dread MVD secret
police, and the relaxation, to some
degree, of direct, forceful control
of the satellites.
The sudden denunciation of
Stalin also brought widespread
confusion in party circles in oth-
er nations. Foreign Communists
who had been devoted to the Stal-
inist line suddenly found that they
were out of step with the top eche-
lon, and were at a loss to know
what to do about it.
Cyprus Dispute.. .
Throughout 1956, the British
were involved in a desperate strug-
gle to hold on to Cyprus, a strate-
gically vital Mediterranean base.
This was prominent in the news
until bigger happenings made it
look insignificant by comparison,

and it dropped off the front pages.
The Cypriots, especially the
Greek segment, were violently de-
manding the removal of British
influence and immediate union
with Greece. The Turkish ele-
ment of the population demanded
union with Turkey, but were not
so violent.
There were constant reports of
guerilla attacks and sabotage
against the British, and of British
retaliation. The counter-moves in-
'cluded patrol of the streets, strict
curfews, widespread roundups and
searches, and the hanging of cap-
tured members of EOKA, the
Greek Cypriot underground organ-
ization.
Andrea Doria Sinks .,..
The single most spectacular
event not connected with armed
conflict was probably the acciden-
tal sinking of the $29,000,000
Italian luxury liner, Andrea Doria.
The Doria collided in July with
the Swedish liner Stockholm just
a few miles out of New York har-
bor. The Doria was coming in,
the Stockholm was outbound.
Thanks to unparalleled courage
and cooperation in the rescue op-
erations, only a very few lives
were lost, and most of those were
victims of the actual collision
rather than the sinking.
The leading role in the dramatic

rescue was played by the French
liner Ile De France, which took on
over a thousand survivors.
Nicaraguan Chief Shot
In South America, one of ' e
major news events was the assas-
sination of Nicaraguan President
Anastasio Somoza. Somoza was
shot several times, but was at first
reported not seriously wounded.
His condition was later called
critical, and President Eisenhower
sent a team of American physi-
cians and surgeons toassist in
treating him, All efforts failed,
however, and Somoza died on
September 29, several days after
the attack. His assassin was killed
by the crowd just a few moments
after he had shot the president.
Sgt. McKeon Tried . . .'
Looking back to the national'
scene, another much-publicized
story was the case of Marine Sgt.
Matthew McKeon.
McKeon was accused of leading
a group of Marine boots on a night
march into a swamp, where six
of them drowned.
He was later court-martialled
and found guilty. The court sen-
tenced him to a nine month prison
term, undesirable discharge from
the Marine Corps, and a fine.
A review board later consider-
ably reduced the punishment.

(Continued from Page 4)
Ical Issues Club requests recognition
Public Relations: Speakers' Bureau
Campus Affairs, progress report
football tickets
Old and New Business
Members and Constituents time
Adjournment
NEXT MEETING JANUARY 9, 1957
Academic Notices
Sociology Colloquim: Prof. Jessie
Bernard, Penn State Univ., will talk on
"Social Problems and Decision Theory."
Wed., Dec. 19, 4:15 p.m., East Lecture
Room Mezz. Floor, Rackham.
Chemistry-Pharmacy Building Christ-
mnas Party. wed., Dec. 19, 7:30 p.m.,
Rooms 1300 and 1400.
Engineering Seniors and Graduate
Students: Free copies of Career - 1957
are available to Engineering seniors and
graduate students at the Engineering
Placement Office, 347 West Engineering
Building.
Doctoral Examination for John Henry
Waddell, III, Astronomy; thesis: "An
Empirical Determination of the Tur-
bulence Field in the Solar Photosphere
Based on a Study of weak Fraunhofer
Lines," Thurs., Dec. 20, at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, Keith Pierce.
Doctoral Examination for Alan Char-
les Kolb, Physics; thesis: "Theory of
Hydrogen Line Broadening in High-
Temperature Partially Ironized Gases,"
Wed., Dec. 19. West Council Room, at
1:30 p.m. Chairman, Otto Laporte.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
vacancies on their teaching staffs for
the second semester.
Livonia, Michigan (Clarenceville Pub-
lic Schools)-Elementary Grades.
Midland, Michigan-All Elementary
Grades; Ninth* Grade Social Studies,
New Baltimore, Michigan (Anchor
Bay Schools)-Second Grade; Industrial
Arts.
Pontiac, Michigan (Waterfront Town-
ship Schools)-vocal Music.

Rawlins, Wyoming -Choral Music
Director.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Adi-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511. Ext.
489.
PERSONNEL REQUESS:
Vertol Aircraft Corp., (formerly Pia-
secki Helicopter Corp.) Morton, Pa., has
an opening for a Chief of Aerody-
namics with 10 years of ,Areo. E. ex-
perience, preferably with 3 years in
rotary wing work, and for a Chief of
Flight Test with 10 years of experience
in Aircraft E., preferably with 3 years
related to flight test operations in the
vertical take-off and landing field.
St. Elizabeth Hospital, Youngstown,
Ohio, is looking for men or women to
work as Food Production Manager and
Cafeteria Manager.
Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Ill.,
is interested in finding a Feb. graduate
or a recent graduate for the position

of Personnel Trainee to be located in
Chicago and work with plants in var-
ious areas throughout the U.S.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 371.
CAREER OPEN HOUSE:
Joseph Horne Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.,
would like to invite college juniors
and seniors to a career conference on
Fri., Dec. 28. The conference will be
open to both men and women inter-
ested in any phase of retailing.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
The Summer Placement Service will
be held at the Union from 9 a.m. to
4:30, Wed., Dec. 19. There will be job
openings for men and women at camps,
resorts, and in industry.

For very special
~ and very pleasing
..: Gifts
THE FINEST
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
Fountain Pen ensembles .. .
Beautiful Desk Sets ... etc.
MORRILLS
314 South State .- Since 1908

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At the same time, a United'
Nations internationalpolice force
was formed to take over the job
of policing the canal zone until a'
settlement of the dispute isj
reached.
Meanwhile, in another part of
Egypt. the Israeli army drove
across the Sinai peninsula to the
borders of the Canal. Israel
claimed the invasion was designed
to wipe out raider headquarters
in the Sinai Desert, from which
Egyptian patrols had been har-
assing Israeli border settlements.
There were reports, however. '
that the attack had actually been
planned in conjunction with, and
coordinated with the Anglo-
French assault.
Hungarian Revolt Rages
A second item of top interna-
tional interest in 1956 was the No-
vember Hungarian revolt and the
- -'

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TUNE-UP

Time for Your
WINTER CHECK UP

-1i

see YOUR Show Produced
Musket is looking for a Broadway-caliber script
for production in December, 1957. All students
on campus are invited to submit original musical
comedy material for our consideration. We will
observe the following deadlines:

Complete Winterizing
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