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December 18, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MC HIGAN DAILY

TTTFAnAV- nIP.fMVM" It IfIR* ,

PAGE ~ix TIlE MICHIGAN DAIlY V'TTE'QT~ A ~ W~I~f ~ 4*

1 . 'K~L1fx A #L ' l ,~.lYAIr:, 18£, 1956I

MIDDLE EAST TURMOIL:
Pro-Soviet Clique Gains Syrian Control
A rms from teCmust unknown number of MGets
bloc reportedly arriving at escaped the British-French
the rate of two shiploads ::bombing of Egypt by flying ...
each week. Into Syrian airports.
" t::..s ....r Kameshli .:::..::
A El Haseke.
Euphrates R
BanayasR Deitr ez Zor
...... .. I ........
H D ama
HS Y I
pipelines when Egypt was
0Pump ng Stations.
"'TI
a "api :r
0AP N sft::ur:..A p
: atackd by AP Fewscth e

Stars Seen Civil Service
As Symbols Examinations
To Be Given
For easo The U.S.Civilervi C

i;

By The Associated Press
While the eyes of the world were
on Egypt, events have been quietly
taking place in another part of
the Middle East that threaten in
the end to prove just as explosive
as those in the Suez Canal area.
During the turmoil caused by
military action in Egypt, a pro.
Soviet clique of army officers took
conltrol of Syria. While avowedly
non-Communist, this group wants
to move Syria closer to the Rus-
sian orbit.
Strongman of the outfit report-
edyl is Lt. Col. Aboul Hamid Saraj,
chief of military intelligence.
Alliance Cut
Adding to the uneasiness of the
West over developments in Syria
was the announcement by the new
Premier of Jordan, Syria's south-
ern neighbor, that he was moving
to cut Jordan's 35-year alliance
with Britain and was studying the

question of closer ties with Rus-
sia.
If Jordan should get in step
with Russia, the influence of the
Soviets would stride across the
Middle East alp the way from the
southern border of Turkey to
Jordan's Red Sea coast -- across
from Egypt, which has already
broken with Britain and is swap-
ping cotton for- Communist arms.
This area would still be cut off
from direct land contact with
Russia, however, by Turkey, Iraq
and Iran members along with
Pakistan and Britain of the mu-
tual defense "Baghdad Pact."
Government Opposed
But already reports from Bagh-
dad, the Iraqi capital, tell of a
mounting campaign against the
Iraqi government - a campaign
which is believed to be the work
of "the controlling pro-Soviet

army clique in Syria and the
Egyptian government."
Broadcasts oftrumors of army
mutiny and civil disturbance
plainly are aimed at compelling
Iraqi Premier Nuri Said to resign,
but Ryan reports Said has no in-
tention of doing so.
The Syrians, meanwhile, are ac-
cusing the Iraqis of attempting to
overthrow the Syrian and Jor-
dian governments. A. U.S. State
Department spokesman, however,
has commented: "Tensions from
this area are not coming from
Iraq."
Soviet Arms
The American spokesman, press
officer Lincoln White, said Syria
already had received "substantial"
arms shipments from Russia.
Syrian Prime Minister Sabri
Assali called this statement
"totally baseless," but State De-
partment sources estimated Rus-
sian shipments to Syria at more
than 30 million dollars' worth,
including light tanks and artil-
lery.
British sources at the United
Nations ran this figure up to 60
million - along with about 400
Egypt-up to Nov. 10.
White said the Soviet policy is
"to add to tensions in the area,"
and hardly had he spoken when
Soviet Foreign Minister Shepilov
accused Britain, France and Israel
of planning to move against Jor-
dan and Syria.

As Christmas-time approaches,!
symbols of the season will be seen
in the heavens, according to Prof.
Hazel M. Losh, of the astronomy
department.
"During December, our atten-
tion and interest are constantly
drawn to the sky and the stars in
some vain attempt to interpret
astronomically the early Christ-
mas star," Prof. Losh pointed out.
Star of Bethlehem
"Although we are continually
reminded by the limited descrip-
tion of the early calendars that
any exact explanation of the Star
of Bethlehem's appearance are out
of the question," she continued,1
"the bright planets are always
promising and alluring."
The constellations of December
are perhaps the most striking of
the whole year.
"Fittingly the Northern Cross
is steadily moving toward the west
and may be seen to splendid ad-
vantage on Christmas Eve," Prof.
Losh related. "After dark, it will
stand upright against the western
sky, a beautiful symbol of the
Christmas season."
Brightest Star
In the constellation of Canis
Major, the brightest of all stars,
Sirius, will also be prominent this
month.
"From time immemorial," Prof.
Losh explained, "Sirius has been
watched, admired and revered,
rising as it does in the early even-
ing around Christmas time."
Santa Claus
Reports Slow
Mail Activity
By The Associated Press
Some of the sentimental appeal
of Christmasy postmarks from
Indiana's river country is missing
this year.
Elbert Reinke, whose postoffice
at Santa Claus usually handles
millions of pieces of Christmas
mail, reported business "slow"
yesterday, with only a week left
until Christmas.
Instead of the dozen helpers he
usually puts to work about Dec.
10, Postmaster Reinke hired only
eight this year to start helping
him and his wife in the job of
stamping mail with the Santa
Claus postmark.
Reinke said thousands of visitors
still come on Sundays to visit the
Santa Claus toy shops and ar-
cades of life-sized Mother Goose
characters.

Medieval Society, meeting, 8 p.m.,
3L, Union, speaker: Mr. Danielson,
"Cavaliers and Country Girls."
* * .
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, mid-week tea, 4:30-6 p.m., Guild
House.
Ballet and Modern Dance Clubs, Com-
bined meeting, 7:30 p.m., Barbour Gym.
* * .
Hillel, advanced Hebrew, 7:30 p.m.,
Hillel.
Lutheran Student Association, carol-
ing Party, 7:15 p.m., meet at Center.
* S *
Hillel, social committee meeting, 4:15
p.m., WAB.
Riding Club, meeting, 7 p.m., WAB.
« * s
Women's Rifle Club, meeting, 7:15
p.m., WAB.
D e u t s c h e r Verein, annual Weih-
nachtsfeier, 7:30 p.m., Room 3G, Union.
Pre-Med Society, mass meeting, 7:30-
9 p.m., Auditorium D, Angell Hall.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, Matin
service and breakfast, 7:10-7:40 a.m.,
Wednesday, chapel.
SGC, student activities scholarship
board, petitioning is open for three
positions on the student activities schol-
arship board through Dec. 19. Petitions
are available at Mrs. Callahan's office,
1020 Administration Building.
I

t.
k

1tCu1. . V1 evce ommiS-
sion recently announced an exam-
ination for trainee positions in
several fields, at starting pays of
$3175 and $3415 per year.
Candidates in the fields of ac-
counting. agricultural economics,
entomology, h o m e economics,
plant pest control, and statistics
will be examined. The amount of
academic training will determine
the grade level assigned.
More information and applica-
tions are obtainable from the
commission in Washington, D.C.

Organization
Notices

If

INDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4) Dept. Customer Service work is: 1.
Train IBM personnel and customers on
Persnne Intrviws:how to set up and apply equipment
Representatvies from the following to business procedures, 2. Helpcustom-
will be at the Bureau of Appointments: ers in their installations on machine
Tues., Jan 8 and systems problems, 3. Work with
Moore Business Forms, Inc., Detroit, salesmen on new approaches to data
Mich. - men with any degree (acctg. processing.
helpful) for sales. Fri., Jan 11
Herpolsheimers, Grand Rapids, Mich. American Seating Co., Grand Rapids,
(positions available nationwide - men Mich. - men in LS&A and BusAd for
and women with any degree for Execu- Sales, General Management, Industrial
tive Training for Management positions Relations, and Acctg. Sales personnel
in Sales Promotion, Merchandising, Fi- may be located anywhere throughout
nance, Personnel, and Operating. the U.S.
Wed., Jan. 9 For appointments contact the Bureau
Guaranty Trust Co. of N.Y., New York, of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
(company has foreign offices in Lon- ext. 371. See the Daily after vacation for
don, Paris and Brussels) - men with any additions to the interviews sched-
degrees in Econ., Acctg., Law and Lib- uled.
eral Arts for trainees in Credit and Se- Personnel Requests:
curity Analysis for Management Devel- A local organization has an opening
opment. for a woman with a B.A. degree to work
Thurs., Jan. 10 as Social Worker. Experience working
International B u s i n e s s Machines with children is helpful.
Corp., Detroit, Mich.-men and women For further information contact the
with any degree for Customer Services Bureau of Appointments.

DECEMBER
TECHNIC
PHOTO QUIZ

SUITS, DRESSES, COATS
Cleaned and pressed ... 99e
TROUSERS and SKIRTS
Cleaned and Pressed . .. 50e
SAME-DAY SERVICE
SUN CLEANERS
Fourth and Washington Phone NO 2-3488
I.I

Old German Restaurant
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST, FINEST IN MUSIC AND
FINEST IN FOOD
TAKE OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
Open from 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8 P.M. - Closed Thursdays
Phone NO 2-0737
Smart guys and gals
going places...
° 0 0
Going home . . . to the games .
weekend visits, The going's easier in
Scenicruiser Luxury
CHICAGO
Q $650

'1I

You can write

Next

Year's

I

MUSKET

Series

I

I

I

See Show Produced
Musket s looking for a Broadway-caliber script
for production in December, 1957. All students
on campus are invited to submit original musical
comedy material for our consideration. We will
observe the following deadlines:
1. Scenarios are due January 7.
2. Scenarios will be returned (approved
or disapproved) with comments on
February 7.

I

I

3. Completed scripts - including

dia-

logue, production notes, music and
lyrics - are due May 1.

W Detroit . ...... .

.$1.20

I

I

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