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December 16, 1956 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

SECTION TWO-PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,1958

------------------------------
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NEW CONTROVERSY IMMINENT:
Complex Laws Slow Refugee Flights

Tota[ a
McCar
Q From ASIA
500 From
AUSTRALIA
angdneihbo
ceourrfries

of National Quotas Set by
rran-Walter Act: 154,657

ITotacls are in f6'zund nLmber,
' l 4

'r,

150.000AS

UNITED STATES

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From MIDDLE EAST

r throuqh presidentilacfLarn
an emergent n laase has'
been itn'oked to permitlenlrj
of21500 0 Ha arir n refuges

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1,200
From
AFRICA

Quotas of Selected Countries

<f(C aesymrnbol e u a s.1,000i mm gr a ns.

BRTAI ~ TA 11l361
GERMANY IRELAND 11111if li POLAND O.tf
25,814 17,756 6,488
ITALY FRANCE SWEDEN CZECH, SWITZ H UNGARYIass GREECE 3J INDIAfi 9 AP, \M
5,645 3.069 3,295 2,859 1;698 a .---*.uw)Jvuflrfl {

I

-

-j AP Newsteature% 1

1 - BUY AND BROWSE AT I By The Associated Press
Last week giant planes of the try forced to close Its schools in
r many areas to provide shelter from
1 -° I Military Air Transport Service be- the winter cold for the upwards of
F I gan ferrying into the United 120,000 Hungarians who swarmed
t: I States the first of some 21,500 through the battered Iron Curtain
I stte S. Iseeking haven in the West - have
State St. at N. University Hungarians who abandoned their copkine bter f the sl-
country after Russian tanks bru- and a rtrl of iec-
tally reimposed Moscow's control ness and apparent lack of direc-
.......... ........---.........--........ in Hungary. tion exhibited by U.S. representa-
Just now approaching full stride tives in Vienna during the early
six weeks after the first wave of stages of the mass exodus.
ME RRY CHRISTMAS!refugee Hungarians arrived in Laws Complex
MYM Austria, the operation already has Undoubtedly, these conditions
come in for criticism abroad, were caused primarily by the com-
Many in Austria-a small coun- plexity of the United States im-
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Western Hemisphere to 154,657
and sets forth in precise detail
exactly how this number shall be
made up. Canada, Mexico and the
countries of Central and South
America are exempt from the quo-
ta. The quotas from other regions
and for selected countries are
shown on the accompanying map.
Hungarian Quota
Hungary's quota under this law
is only 865 immigrants per year.
President Eisenhower has opened
the door to a number far in excess
by invoking a section of the 'law
which provides that in emergen-
cies persons may enter the United
States "on parole," with many re-
quirements of the law temporarily
waived and a decision on perman-
ent eligibility indefinitely post-
poned. The provision was designed
to permit grants of individual asy-
lum.
By invoking blanket "parole"
for thousands, it is apparent that
the Hungarian refugee operation
is going to compromise severely
the national origins principle in
the present law - a principle
holding that immigration should
be permitted only in a nationality
pattern set by the proportion of
given nationalities in the U.S
population. Under the McCarran,
Walter Act quotas, 80 per cent of
the total quota is granted to five
countries: Great Britain, Ger-
many, Ireland, Poland and Italy.
Mortgage System
This quota system, often de-
nounced as unfair to the coun-
tries of southern Europe, has been
partially bypassed previously. One
system is to "mortgage" future
quotas for certain countries by
admitting more immigrants than
normally would be permitted for
that country and charging the ex-
cess against future years.
Quotas for some countries have
been "mortgaged" so that only
half the lawful annual quota will
actually be usable through the
year 2,000.
Another large bypass was the
Refugee Relief Act of 1953, under
which admission was provided for
more than 200,000 persons above
the quotas. This act, however, ex-
pires on the last day of this month.

migration laws - whi ch because
of scope and strict re quirements
have often been the but t of scorn-
ful jokes overseas.
The dramatic air anc [ sea oper-
ation now under was t may do
much to restore the , American
reputation of generosit y, but al-
though the problem f appears to
be in hand in Europe i t probably
will be months before Americans
hear the end of the deb ates which
will be forced upon Cc ingress by
the current refugee fli hts.
Controversial
In modern times, tl e problem
of immigration has be f ,n a con-
stant sore point in American poli-
tics. The nation's ba sic immi-
gration law - a prnovision of
which President Eisenl-tower in-
voked to make possible the cur-
rent influx of Hungarn ns - is
the Immigration and Zi;; tionality
Act' of 1952, commonly mnown as
the McCarran-Walter .J k(t.
In brief, this act limits; the over-
all quota of immigran s admis-
sible on a permanent b asis from
countries other than thc )e in the

BELIEF-There is no doubt in a child's mind, after talking it
over with Santa, Christmas morning all the treasures she has
dreamed will be under the Christmas tree. After all, Santa
told her didn't he?
Santa Claus Takes
Hs Job Seriously

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By PHILIP MUNCK
Rha Arnold is a Santa Claus.
He can sum up his philosophy
about his job in 4 very few words:
"Most of the kids who come inj
to see me -are really sincere, ,andI
I can't let them down."
Arnold is an old hand at the
job of playing Santa's part. He
had his first job as Santa when
a church wanted to put on a show
with Santa Claus. Since then he
has been Santa Claus to the child-
ren who come to him at a local
store to tell him what they want
for Christmas.
Christmas Meaning
Santa Arnold doesn't have much
trouble with children who don't
believe i~n Santa Claus. "I don't
try to talk them into believing,"
he said. "I talk to them about the
true meaning of Christmas. It's
surprising how many parents
haven't told their children about
the real reason we celebrate
Christmas. A lot of people are
too concerned with giving presents
to remember that this is Christ's
birthday."
He finds the job takes a lot of
practical psychology. "I try to
watch the parents to find out
about the child," he explained.
If he asks for a great many things,
I try to see how much he will
get by watching the parents. That
way, I won't accidentally promise
him something he probably won't
receive."
Arnold finds that most of the
children who come to see him are

genuinely frightened of him be-
cause they are afraid that they
haven't been good enough. "I give
them a piece of candy and that
usually breaks the ice," he
chuckled.
"I ask them the usual questions
about whether they have been
good and what they have done
to help their mothers. This helps
to further ease the tension and
lets me learn a little about them,"
Santa Arnold tries to see if there
is anything he can do to help
the children who talk to him. He
often finds that a child has a
genuine nervous problem that his
parents weren't aware of. "When
that happens I try to tell the par-
ents," he explained.
Be Sincere
"The most important thing is
to be sincere. A lot of men just
try to see how many kids they
can talk to in a night. I try to
give each one as much time to
talk as he wants."
Next to being sincere, Arnold
warned it is very important to
put up a good front. He feels that
a good Santa has to have a good
costume. "Kids who see 'those
Santa on the street dressed.,in
cheap outfits will say to their
parents, 'That wasn't Santa
Claus.'"
Arnold finds that it is not just
the little children who come to
him. "I used to be a teacher here
in Ann Arbor," he said, "and many
of my former pupils come down
to talk to me at Christmas tinie."

E
E

To all residents of
AlS &DORMS
Before you leave for
Christrnas Vacation,
leave your clothes
at the house desk.

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returned all clean
and fre5ch when you

get baclk.

I

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