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December 16, 1956 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.o

I

DECEMBER 18. 1958

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SECTION TWO-PAGE FIVE

Y ++

Highlights of

1956 Melbourne Olympics Reviewed

" 4'

By AL JONES
Russia's Olympic athletes ral-
lied valiantly, overcame a terri-
fic Americas, lead, and won their
first Olympic Games this month
'In Melbourne, Australia.
Although this "team" victory is
unofficial in the opinion of the
organizers of the Games, it is the
fact of most importance to the
spectators that are unable to at-
tend the games, and must wach
the results in newspapers and
magazines.
The Russians ended up with a
point total of 722, while the
'United States athletes had to
settle for 593. The next highest
was the home country, Australia
with, 278%, closely followed by
Germany, Hungary, Italy and
Great Britain in that order.
. The Russians gained their win-
ning margin in the gymnastics
and wrestling events, plus some
w valuable points ,from women's
track and the soccer and water
polo games. The United States
_ earned few points in these events,
and was hindered in the swimming
,competition by Australia's strong
showing.
No Professionals
This is the first time since the
origin of, the games' early this cen-
tury that the United States hasn't
been the strongest team. One fac-
tor that helps the Russians, and
many, other European countries is
the fact that no athletes there are
professional.
All of the talented competitors
are trained and coached by the
government, and are not forced
to turn professional or seek oth-
er means of support. If many of
America's professional athletes
were able to compete, it is a cinch
that the United States would have
*,a stronger 'team in many of the
fields of Russian domination.
Nevertheless, the, Americans
can cite many bright spots in the
1956 Olympics - such as the Yale
crew's surprise sculling victory,
the complete supremacy in bas-
ketball by Bill Russell and his
teammates, the terrific diving of
Mrs, Pat McCormick, Shelley
Mann's c o n t i n u e d swimming
greatness, and the close victory of
U.S. weightlifters over the Soviets.
U.S. Sweeps Track Events
The brightest spot of all for
the Americans was the most com-
plete sweep of men's track and
field competition ever made by
any country. The United States
thinclads, in collecting a total of
15 gold medals - almost.half of
the Americans' final total - prac-
tically wrote an epic in track and
field history.
One world's record was broken,
in the 400-meter relay, and 11
Olympic records were bettered.
But it was more than a story of
men running and jumping faster,
higher and farther than ever be-
fore - because many of the victo-
ries were surprises, and many of
the expected victors were beaten.
Greatest Athletes
The thing that made it a truly
great track and field series, was
that when one American faltered,
another came through in the

clutch. Competing against thet
greatest athletes in the world, i
and under the greatest strain
imaginable, these athletes deserve {
the greatest credit possible Iford
their accomplishmnentsf
The most outstanding member
of the team, cited by many ast
the "greatest group of athletes
ever' assembled", was Bobby Mor-
row of Abilene Christian College
in Texas.
He was the only triple Gold
Medal winner in the group, top-
ping the field in both the 100
and - 200-meter dashes, and an-I
choring the record breaking 400-
meter relay.7
Compared to Owens
Morrow has been compared by
many coaches with the fabulous
Jesse Owens of the 1936 Olym-
pics. Owens held three world's
records for many years, but now
retains only the broad-jump
mark.
Morrow broke his long-stand-'
this year.7
The type of victories in track
that make the competition al-
most wither away are the clean
sweeps, when one team grabs'
the . first three places, and the
respective medals. The United
States accomplished this feat
Next Season's
M'Football
Schedule Set
Michigan's football schedules
for the 1957 and 1958 seasons show
little difference from this year's
schedule.
In 1957, Southern California re--
places UCLA, and Georgia fills in
the slot. vacated by Army.
The only change from 1957 to
1958 results when the Navy Mid-
shipmen play instead of Georgia,
The Michigan State game will
be here in 1957, and at East
Lansing in 1958. After that, the
series may continue on a home-
and-home basis.
Once more the Wolverines will
not face the Badgers of Wiscon-
sin, or the Boilermakers of Pur,-
due. It is noted that there will
be only six home games each of
the next two following seasons, as
contrasted with seven this past
season.
The schedules are as follows:

twice in the hurdles, and again
in the discus and the 200-meter
dash.
One of te hurdle sweeps came
as expected, with big Glenn Da-
vis winning the 400-meter hur-
dles, followed by Eddie Southern
and John Cubreath. The other
race found favored Jack Davis,
the world record holder, running
second to teammate Lee Calhoun
in a photo-finish. Both were
closely followed by bronze medal
winner Joel Shankle.
Records Held
The field events offered little
resistence to the American ath-
letes, except for a Danish victory
in the javelin throw by Enil
Danielson.
Two 1952 Olympic champions
while a third was upset by an-
other American.
Rev. Bob Richards successfully
guarded his pole-vault crown,
while. Parry O'Brien continued
his domination of world shot put-
ting.
Two other Americans grabbed
second places in these events -
Bob Gutowski in the vault, and
Bill Neider in the shot, to bolster
American domination.
Gordien Defeated
Fortune Gordien, world rec-
ord holder, wasrtopped by team-
mate Al Oerter in the discus
throw. They were closely fol-
lowed by anotherrAmerican, Des
Koch.
Newer faces won the remain-
ing three field events. 19-year-old
Charlie Dumas, the boy who
broke the seven-foot barrier in
the high jump, easily won that
event. MeanwhileHalConnolly,
who recently broke the world's
hammer throw record, beat out
his many European opponents
with a sparkling performance.
Cliff Blair, who had been favored
earlier in that event, was dropped
from the team for loss of ama-
teur standing.
The final field event win came
from a Big Ten competitor, Greg
Bell of Indiana. Bell is the top
broad jumper in the world, and a
threat to Jesse Owne's fabulous
record that was set at Michigan's
Ferry Field in 1937.
Decathlon Challenging
Of course ,the most challeng-
ing event in any Olympics is the
Decathlon. A lanky, spirited boy
from California named Rafer
Johnson had broken Bob Ma-
thias' world record for point-
total in this event during the
Olympic trials, but when he ar-
rived at Melbourne, he twisted a
knee during practice.
Johnson still competed, but
performed a little under par.
The fact that his main rival
was hobbled, and that the United
States domination was threat-
ened, combined to exhort Camp-
bell to a brilliant performance,
only 20 points short of John-
son's record, and well ahead of
Mathias' Olympic record from
1952.

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MERRY CHRISTMAS!

OLYMPIC WINNERS-Shelley Mann, right, of Arlington, Va., rests in the Olympic pool at Mel-
bourne with teammates Mary Sears, left, Chevy Chase, Md., and Nancy Ramey of Mercer Island,
Wash., after sweeping the Olympic women's 100 meter butterfly-stroke competition.

In one of the most exciting
races of the Games, America's
Tom Courtney edged out Brit-
ain's Derek Johnson in the 800-
meter run. Either Courtney, or
Pittsburgh's Arnie Sowell were
expected to win.
Sowelld ,finished fourth, after
setting too fast a pace. Johnson
was the first to pass Sowell, and
then Courtney came up and
forged into the lead on the last
turn to win by a yard.
Another close race forced the
athletes to battle cold and wind
besides the world's most intense
competition. Lou Jones, world
record holder, made the same
mistake aspSowell, and set an
impossible pace.
But his failure only opened the
path to another fine American
runner, Charlie Jenkins of Vil-
lanova, who edgedout Germany's
Karl Haas for the gold medal.
Olympic Spirit
The true spirit of this do-or-
die "world" track meet could be
seen after that race, when Jones,
who finished a disappointing
fifth, carried the completely ex-
hausted Jenkins over to the win-
ner's stand - the stand on which
Jones himself should have been.
Although that concludes the
American domination of the
track and field, there was one
other outstanding athlete. He was

the man that kept the U.S. from
sweeping all of the events - or
at least any events that measured
over three miles.
In 1952 EmilZatopek turned in
a great performance, winning
three gold medals in the long dis-
tance races. This year. Russian
Vladimer Kuts, breaking two of
Zatopek's records, won both the
5,000 and 10,000 meter runs -
and ,dept the Russians from be-
ing blanked in track and field.
Nuts Extraordinary
Kuts isn't just an ordinary
runner, who zooms out, ahead of
the pack, and ignores the rest of
the runners. He makes it all the
rougher on the other competitors
by continually playing with them.
In the 5,000 meter run hie knew
that Britain's Gordon Pirie would
be the chief competitor. So Kuts
raced out to a terrific lead, forc-
ing Pirie to follow him.
After about half the race was
over, Kuts slowed way down,
forcing Pirie to pass him. Finally,
after hanging on Pirie's tail, Kuts
turned on a devastating sprint,
leaving Pirie in the dust and
crossing the finish line 11 sec-
onds ahead of the nearest corh-
petitor.
Pirie, who finished fifth, de-
clared, "I hope I never have to
race a man like that again."
Kuts Clowns
After the, race was over, Kuts,

acting as if he hadn't just fin-
ished a three and a half mile
race, bounded around the 400-
meter track, hamming it up with
the 100,000-person crowd and
leading a great cheer for himself.
Although he may seem like a,
diabolical and almostdisgusting
athlete, he is nevertheless great.
And one should remember that
he is the first Russian athlete
ever to win a gold medal in track
and field since the Olympic
Games was organized.
One can count on the fact that
he won't be the last.

Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

1957
28-Southern Cal at LA
5-Georgia at Ann Arbor
12-Michigan State at AA
19-Northwestern at AA
26-Minnesota at Minn.
2-Iowa at Ann Arbor
9-Illinois at Champaign
16-Indiana at Ann Arbor
23-Ohio State at AA
1958
27-Southern Cal at AA
4-Mich. St. at E. Lansing
11-Navy at Ann Arbor
28-N'western at Evanston
25-Minnesota at AA
1-Iowa at Ann Arbor
8-Illinois at Ann Arbor
15-Indiana at Ann Arbor
22-Ohio St. at Columbus

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