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December 13, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-13

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PAGE SMX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TEWRSDAY. DECEMTIER 1:1_ MM

.llalTT l fln , JPues 1, ITAu I 1.,i1a

17

I

BETTER ROADS:
'U' Research Tests Highway Durability

Journalism Department
Enrollment Skyrockets

RiORGANIZATION NOTICES
Riding Club, meeting, 7 p.m. WAB. back, election of officers, 7 p.m., WUOM Lutheran Student Association, vesper
« + + studios. services, 9:30 p.m., Chapel.
3 1 Cirola Italianao La Serata Mus-li*

4

By JAMES BOW
New highways are being built
throughout Michigan and the na-
tion, aided by research being car-
ried on at the University.
In the basement of the East
Engineering Building, research
workers are studying the durability
of various types of highway con-
crete as a part of a long range
program established 35 years ago
by the University and the State
Highway Department.
The subject of the present re-
search is the gravel which is mixed
in concrete, and the effect of the
gravel on the quality of the con-
crete pavement.
Pits and Cracks
Prof. F. E. Legg, in charge of
the program, explained that con-
crete often becomes pitted and
cracks because of freezing and
thawing of the pavement.
To determine which types of
gravel are best for durable con-
crete, research workers make rec-
tangular blocks of °concrete, then
subject these blocks to tests in a
"torture chamber."
This torture chamber is a room
kept at zero degrees Fahrenheit,,
and the blocks are frozen in frigid
air for three hours, then thawed
under water for one hour.
Freezing and Thawing
These freezing and thawing in-
tervals are kept up all year long,
according to Prof. Legg, and some

The journalism department leads-
the nation's accredited journalism
schools In enrollment increase,
Michigan publishers and editors
meeting in Ann Arbor learned
yesterday.
Here for a three-day session on
the teaching of journalism at the
University, members of the Michi-
gan Press Association Journalism
Education Committee were told of
a steady journalistic enrollment
Increase at the University for
three straight years.
Michigan Increase
Of the 38 accredited journalism
schools reporting this fall's regis-
tration, 15 of them reported de-
creases, whereas Michigan has an
increase of 36 per cent.
Committee expressed apprecia-
tion of the press of Michigan for
the excellent support the Univer-
sity is giving journalism on the
campus.
The committee also congratu-
lated Professor Wesley H. Maurer,
chairman of the Department of
Journalism, and his staff for origi-
nal approaches to journalism edu-
cation.
Unanimous Support
Department plans for extending
the program into the community
newspaper field were given unani-
mous support.
Committeemen also asked con-
tinued support of plans to expand
offerings in pictorial journalism,
in advertising and to the depart-
ment's internship program.
Supplementation of training
with such co-operptive projects
as the department and its stu-

dents undertook last summer at

w ivrcoi Taao , ~ rta s-
the Evart Review, on which they cale, 7:30 p.m., Henderson Room,j
conducted editorial, advertising Lagu.
and business departments for 12 Human Relations Board, meeting. 12-
weeks, was also approved. 1:30 p.m., League.
The committee stressed the in-.
d d f the Modern Dance Club, meeting and
dusry u pn oun ali m s l I- tryouts, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m., Barbour'
dstry upon Journalism schools Gym
for a steady flow of adequately . .
prepared journalists. Gilbert and Sullivan, Ruddigore Play-
DAN IEL GREEN'S
of the season ! A
Smartest, best fitting scuff
you've ever tried Pliant leather
on a brand new scuff last so that
you walk with the least flippety-
flop. Wonderful felt cushion
sole makes you feel as
If you're walking on air,
a

Baha'i Student Group, discussion, Hillel, beginning Hebrew class, 7 p.
Fireside Room. Lane Hall. u IHillel,

Kappa Phi, Christmas Desert.
p.m., home of Mrs. Donald Katz.
* * *

7:15

Christian Science Organization, meet-
ing, 7:30 p.m., Upper Room, Lane Hall.
0 * *
Young Republicans, faculty panel,
annual elections, 8 p.m., Room 38,
Union.

Michigan Christian Fellowship, John
Stott Lecutres. "What Must I Do" 8
p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
* * *
Westminster Student Fellowship,
Bible Study, 4:15 p.m., League.
* * *
Hawaiian Club, Christmas Party, 7:30
p.m., Friday, Lane Hall.

-Daily-David Arnold
ROAD RESEARCH-The Highway Laboratory's "Torture Cham-
ber" tests the durability of concrete pavement by a series of
freezing and thawing periods.

concrete blocks last for several
months.
"This is a hard test for any,
construction material to with-
stand," Prof. Legg added.
The research also uses an elec-
tronic machine which vibrates the
concrete samples, records the
sound waves transmitted, and in
this way determines how well the
samples are holding up through
the tests.

Research workers on the project
include full time Highway Depart-
ment employees and part-time
students.
Prof. Legg summarized the re-
search as aiming to "provide bet-
ter highways through improved
technology of road-building," and,
he commented, "to insure that
the taxpayers' dollars are well
spent."

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t

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN]

(Continued from Page 4)
Pl,, Alpha Gamma Delta, Alpha Kappa
Alpha, 'Alpha Phi, Chi Omega, Col-
legiate Sorosis, Delta Sigma Delta,
Delta Theta Phi, Gamma Phi Beta,
Graduate Council, Kappa Kappa Gam,
ma,Martha Cook, Mosher, Phi Delta Phi,
Phi Epsilon Pi, Phi Kappa Tau, Psi
Upsilon, Zeta Beta' Tau.
Dec. 15, (1:00 closing): Acacia, Alpha
Chi Sigma, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha
Kappa Kappa, Alpha Kappa Psi, Alpha
Rho Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Tau
Omega, Beta Theta Phi, Chi Psi, Chi-
cago, Chinese Student Club, Delta Chi,
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Sigma Delta,
Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Del-
ta Tau Delta, Delta Theta Phi,. Delta
Upsilon, East Quadrangle, Evans Schol-
ars, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Michigan House,
Nu Sigma Nu, Phi Delta Phi, Phi Delta
Theta, Phi Epsilon Pi, Phi Gamma Del-
ta, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Tau,
Phillipine Michigan Club, Phi Rho Sig-
ma, Prescott, Psi Omega, Psi Upsilon,
Sigfna Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma
Phi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon, Theta Xi, Triangle, Ullr Ski Club,
West Quadrangle, Williams, Zeta Beta
Tau.
Dec. 16: Alpha Chi Omega, Couzens
Hall-Jordan Hall, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Mosher Hall, Phi Delta Phi, Theta Xi,
Victor Vaughan.
Lectures
Leland Stowe, professor of journal-
ism, will again open his Current World
Events class, Journalism 230, to the
campus public. His topic will be "Red
China's Enormous Gamble: Wholesale
Collectivization By 1960, And Its Mean-
ing to Us." Thurs., Dec. 13. 11:30 a.m.
Aud. D, Angell Hall.
Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures,
"Greek Architecture in Ancient Italy",
by Prof. William B. Dinsmoor of Col-
umbia University. Sixth lecture: "Tem-
ples of the Classical Period", Thurs.,
Dec. 13, Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m.
Meeting of the Michigan Chapter
A.A.U.P. Thurs., Dec. 13, 8:00 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater. Dr. Ralph Fuchs,
General Secretary, A.A.U.P., will speak
on "The Progress and Problems of
A.A.U.P." Discussion and question peri-
od will follow Dr. Fuchs' talk. This is
an open meeting. The entire Univer-
sity faculty is invited.
Plays
Juno and the Paycock, by Sean O'Ca-
sey, will be presented by the Depart-
ment of Speech at 8:00 p.m. tonight in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
Concerts
Student Recital: June Howe, soprano,
will sing works by Santoliquido, Wolf,
Marx, Massenet, Britten,-and Rachinan-
inoff on Thurs., Dec. 13, at 8:30 p.m. in
Aud. A, Angell Hall, in partial fulfill-
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree Master of Music, Miss Howe will
be accompanied by Miss Joyce Noh. She
is a pupil of Chase Baromeo. Open to
the public.
Academic Notices
All Mechanical and Industrial En-
gineering Sophomores, Juniors, and Se-
niors: Please read counselling instruc-
tions posted at the I.E. and M.E. of-
fices and make appointments with your
advisor before Dec. 21 as instructed.

Students, College of Engineering: A
few scholarships are available for fresh-
men who entered the College of Engi-
neering in Sept., 1956. Limited finan-
cial assistance is also available for stu-
dents in other classes. Applications
should be in by Dec. 21. Blanks avail-
able in 263 West Engineering Building.
School of Business Administration.
Faculty meeting Fri., Dec. 14, 3:30 p.m.,
Room 165.
Two Tutorial Sections of Sociology 1
.will be offered during the second se-
mester to provide an opportunity for
a more intensive and individualized in-
troduction to sociology for apperior
students. Enrollment in each section is
limited to ten students. Freshmen and
sophomores with a grade point average
of 3.0 are eligible to apply for admis-
sion to these sections. Interested stu-
dents should see Prof. Ronald Freedman
in Room 5626, Haven Hall on Mon., from
10 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m., and Fri.
from 4 to 5 p.m.
401 Interdisciplinary Seminar on the
Applications of Mathematics to Social
Science. Room 3401, Mason Hall, 3-4:30
p.m., Thurs., Dec. 13. Frank Restle
(Michigan State University), "A Theory
of Discrimination Learning."
Chemistry Department Orientation
Seminar. Thurs., Dec. 13, 7:00 p.m.,
Room 1300, Chemistry Building. Dr. B.
Jaselskis and Dr. A. Shilt will be the
speakers.
Chemistry Depatment Colloquium.
Thurs., Dec. 13, 8:00 p.m., Room 1300,
Chemistry Building. A. Emery will speak
on "Raman Spectra of Metal Borohy-
drides"; S. Reid will speak on "Studies
in the Synthesis of Alstonine".

Applied Mathematics Seminar: (Math
347) Thurs., Dec. 13, at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 246, West Engineering Building.
Prof. C. L. Dolph will continue his,
talk on "Saddle-Point Characteriza-
tion of the Schwinger Variational Prin-
ciple in Exterior Scattering Problems."
Refreshments at 3:30 p.m. in Room 274,
West Engineering Building.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Al-
bert Bowman, Education; thesis; "Con-
sistencies in the Preparation and Work
of the Public Health Educator", Fri.,
Dec. 14, East Council Room, Rackham
Building, at 2:15 p.m. Chairman, M. E.
Rugen.
Placement Notices
Personnel Interviews :
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Wed., Dec. 19
Thompson Products, Inc., Warren,
Mich. - Feb. men in Ind., Mech., and
Bus. Ad. for Industrial Engrg., Methods
& Plant Layout, Standards Job Evalu-
ations. U.S. citizens.
U.S. Navy Underwater Sounad Lab.,
Ft. Trumbull, New London, Conn. -
all levels in Elect., Instr Math., Mech.,
Naval & Marine, Physi s and Science
for Summer & Regular Research, De-
velopment and Design. U.S. citizens,
Wed., Thurs., Dec. 19 & 20
Giffeis & Valiet, Inc., Detroit, Mich.
all levels in Civil, Ind. and Mech, for
Summer & Regular Design. U.S. citi-
zen.
Thurs., Dec. 20
Rome Air Force Depot, Griffiss Air
Force Base, N.Y.
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W.E., ext. 2182.

Qum

;dranms Tapl

, m vDORMIE
Colors: Black - White
Yellow - Pink - Powder
Blue - Red and Dark Blue.
'l50
VAN OVEN SHOES
. . . 17 Nickels Arcade

East Quadrangle Quadrants
Honorary last night tapped four
members in recognition of their
contributions to their house,
quadrangle and Inter House Coun-
cil student government.
New members are Nancy J.
Plastow, '57, Reed Kenworthey,
'57Ed, Donald L. Upham, '58E,
and Peter H. Hay, '58L.

I

(Author of "Barefoot Boy With Cheek," etc.

a

ATTENTION FEBRUARY GRADS !
Sale of
SENIOR £ANNOUNCEMENTS
Administration Building

s

Monday- Friday,

December 10 through 14

10.00 A.M.--430 P.M.
THIS AD COMPLIMENT OF FOLLETT'S

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1I

- ~2 4~,"

EAT, DRINK, AND BE MARRIED
On a recent tour of seven million American colleges,
I was struck by two outstanding facts: first, the great
number of students who smoke Philip Morris; and second,
the great number of students who are married.
The first phenomenon - the vast multitude of Philip
Morris smokers - comes as no surprise, for what could
be more intelligent than to smoke Philip Morris? After
all, pleasure is what you smoke for, and pleasure is what
Philip Morris delivers. Try one. Light up and see for
yourself.... Or, if you like, don't light up. Just take
a Philip Morris, unlighted, and puff a couple of times.
Get that wonderful flavor? You bet you do! Even with-
out lighting you can taste Philip Morris's fine natural
tobacco. Also, you can make your package of Philip
Morris last practically forever.
No, I say, it was not the great number of Philip
Morris smokers that astounded me ; it was the great
number of married students. Latest statistics show that
at some coeducational colleges, the proportion of married
undergraduates runs as high as twenty per cent ! And,
what is even more startling, fully one-quarter of these
marriages have been blessed with issue!
Now, to the young campus couple who are parents
for the first time, the baby is likely to be a source of con-
siderable worry. Therefore, let me devote today's column
to a few helpful hints on the care of babies.
First of all, we will take up the matter of diet. In
the past, babies were raised largely on table scraps. This,
however, was outlawed by the Smoot-Hawley Act, and
today babies are fed a scientific formula consisting of
dextrose, maltose, distilled water, evaporated milk, and
a twist of lemon peel.
After eating, the baby tends to grow sleepy. A lullaby
is very useful to help it fall asleep. In case you don't
know any lullabies, make one up. For example:
Go to sleep, my little infant,
Goo-goo moo-moo poo-poo bin! ant.
A baby sleeps best on its stomach, so place it that way
in its crib. Then to make sure it will not turn itself over
during the night, lay a soft but fairly heavy object on its
back - another baby, for instance.
So, as you see, raising a baby is no great problem.
All you need is a little patience and a lot of love. 4lso

!j

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First basic improvement since electric shaving .began-it
shaves the way a man's whiskers grow.
First electric shaver that shaves clean right from the start-
his face needs no "break-in" period.y

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