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December 11, 1956 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-11

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PAGE SIX

T"HEMICHIGAN HILLY

TUESDAY. DECE 4B 11, 1956

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DILLY TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1956

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Cross, New Assistant Dean of Men,
Finds IFC Advisor Job Challenging

START OF MODERN PHASE:
Astronomy Frees Man's Intellect

By RICHARD TAUB
Transition from a small Presby-
terain college background, to a
large university could be most dif-
ficult.
Add to that a first administra-
tive job, and even the strongest in-
dividual would be a little uneasy.
Yet, this is exactly what Wil-
liam Cross, assistant dean of men,
and counsellor to the fraternity
system has done. Since his arrival
on campus this September, he has
taken up his job with characteris-
tic vigor.
Has Ieen Around
Not only has he thoroughly ac-
quainted himself with the work-
ings of the Interfraternity Coun-
cil and its officers, but has man-
aged to have dinner at almost ev-
ery fraternity house on campus,
just to meet the people with whom
he is assigned to work.
He's even gone so far as to keep
a steady check on the fellows in
the fraternity system with grades
less than a two point, to make sure
they are doing all right.
Place Was Big
Bill - he encourages a first
name relationship - was a little
uneasy about his new job. His
first few days on campus were dis-
turbing; "the place seemed so
big."
However, students soon started
pouring into school and "the Uni-
versity began to get smaller. Peo-
ple started dropping in to chat,
and I went out to meet people. My
predecessor, William Zerman, used
to be able to just look out this
window and name every student
passing by.
"I can see how. The longer you
stay here, the smaller the school
gets"
Must Know People
Cross feels that his rigorous rou-
tine to get to know people on cam-
pus is a necessity for anyone
wanting to do a good job. "I'd
like students to come to me with
their problems, but I know, that
at first it has to be a 60-40 pro-
position, with me going more than
half way."

I -Daily--Harding Williams
FINDS JOB A CHALLENGE: William Cross, assistant dean of
men, enjoys his new job as both counselor to the fraternity system
and as Dean of Men Walter B. Rea's representative.

Editor's Note: This is the second
in a series of three interpretive ar-
ticles discussing the development of
astronomy and its effects on human
thought.)
By WILLIAM SPODAK
With the development of the
Copernican system great steps for-
ward in astronomy became pos-
sible. Because man was now free
from the many prejudices inher-
ent in the previous egotistical
earth-center-of-the-universe con-
cept.
The work of such men as Galileo
and Kepler showed that this the-
ory was plausible and that it of-
fered a better solution to smoe of
the enigmas that were apparent
in the universe, such as planetary
motion, and thus helped to se-
cure its success.
To Determine Time
But before the 19th century the
main importance of astronomy to
the vast majority of people lay in
its establishment of a period of
time, (e.g.-- the year) and in its
use to determine longitude and
latitude.
The coming of Isaac Newton,
however, heralded in a new phase
in scientific development.
Though proof of the validity of
the Copernican system did not
exist at this time, it was accepted
by a large majority of scientists
and philosophers, and Newton's
work rests on the assumption of
this correctness.
Could Refute Arguments ..
As Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin of
the astronomy department points
out, the Newtonian system was
logical and thus arguments
against it could be easily refuted.
Newton was able to show by his
work that the previously believed
fixed stars must in reality be
quite distant, thousands of times
further than our sun, and in many
respects similar to the sun.
One consideration in the proof
of the former statement was that
if the stars were not so distant,
constellaions, due to the influence
of gravity, could not maintain for
long their apparently constant po-
sitions with respect to one anoth-
er.
Laws Omnipresent
But Prof. McLaughlin believes,
that perhaps the most important
result of Newton's work was that
it showed the ubiquity of physical
laws.
Thus the laws applicable on
earth are also valid for the heav-
ens As a result astronom andI

Many people, when discussing
the possibiltiy of life on other
worlds argue that perhaps laws
applying here are not valid in
other parts of the universe and so
life, different from ours, can eixst.
Prof. McLaughlin calls this idea
"ridiculous." He says that before
one can discuss this problem he
must define the meaning+ of life.
According to Prof. McLaughlin,
"Life is a highly complicated pro-
cess that is associated with very
complex chemistry." But he goes
on further to say that it can't be
considered completely as chemis-
try.
What is Life?
"We must define the degree of
complexity at which inanimate
objects become living, and when
an organism's complexity reaches

this degree we will call it life.
Thus by picking the degree of
complexity one determines the
definition of life," he said.
"Once this definition is made
and if then one searches among
the various elements for the
chemistry that will permit this
complexity, he is brought to the
element carbon, he continued.
"We are stuck with carbon and
its compounds ' and the related
temperatures, pressures and con-
ditions under which they can as-
sume living properties, and we
must use them," Prof. McLaughlin
explained. "One must name a dfi-
ferent kind of chemistry if he
wishes to use it to explain life."
Newton Helped Accuracy
With Newton's new tool, the
laws of gravitation, astronomers
were able to ascertain movements
of the celestial bodies with a high-
er degree of precision.
But until the invention of the
spectroscope, an instrument which
is used to break light into its
componen parts, the main and
perhaps only function of the as-
tronomer was for position deter-
mination.
With the spectroscope, however,
the astronomer was able to broad-
en his horizons and study such
things as chemical composition,
radial velocity, or velocity in the
line of sight, and temperatures of
stars.
But it should be pointed out
that even with this tool astrono-
my could not be considered a
"dead" subject, for the mere pas-
sage of time permits better de-
termination of stellar motion.
(Tomorrow: Present Research in
Astronomy.)
VIGCK
INCORPS

organization
Notices
Westminister Student Fellowship,
party for SHARE project, 7 p.m., Pres-
byterian Strident Center.
f f s
Medieval Society, meeting, 7:45 p.m.,
Rackham Building, speaker: Prof Ray-
mond Kilgour, "Survey of Medieval
Illuminations"
* * *
Hillel, advanced Hebrew class, 7:30
p.m., Hillel,
Hillel, social eommittee meeting, 4
p.m., Hillel.
Women's Rifle Club, match with Uni-
versity of Toledo, 7:15 p.m. today and
tomorrow. WAB.
* * *
Chess Club meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union.
Congregational and Disciples Stu-
dent Guild, mid-week tea, 4:30 -5 p.m.,
Guild House.
* " *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, John
Stott Lecture, "What is Sin", 8 p.m.,
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Physics Club, meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, 2038 Randall, speaker:
Ralph R. Goodman, "The Application
of Acoustics to an Oceanographic Prob-
lem."
Hillel, musical program, "An Evening
With Gershwin" 8 p.m., Wednesday.
Open to the public.
Lutheran Student Association, Matin
service, 7:20 a.m. Wednesday chapel.
s

'I

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UlIr Ski Club, meeting 7:301
Wednesday, Union.

Already a great many men have
come to see him about difficulties
or just to chat. In some cases, he
gets the visit, before the proper
authority does.
Cross has also had students
come to his home to spend the;
evening with his wife and eight
month old daughter. They'll
spend the evening popping corn
and discussing what ever happens
to be the campus topic for that
week, sometimes sports, some-
times SGC, or just fraternities.
Cross has led as varied life.
When he was 17 years old he
joined the Marines, and stayed
with them until the conclusion of
the war.
Before coming to the University,
he attended Caroll College in Wis-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

conson, taught Junior High School
in North Carolina, took courses at
six different Universities, spent
some more time in the Marines
during the Korean War and was
National Field Secretary for Sig-
ma Phi Epsilon fraternity.
"Don't Tell Students
His job as field secretary for
Sig Ep gave him a chance to do
just that.
In one year he visited every
state east of the Mississippi. Dur-
ing that time he learned an im-
portant lesson: "You don't tell
students what to do. You just lis-
ten to their .points of view and
then you make suggestions. It's
the only way to get things done."
Cross enjoys his new job, both
as a counsellor to the fraternity
system and as Dean of Men Walt-
er B. Rea's representative. "I
wouldn't trade it for the world,"
he said.
British Expert
Will Lecture
John A. Hawgood, professor of
modern history and government
at the University of Birmingham,
Birmingham, England, will lecture
at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud. C, An-
gell Halh
Title of the lecture will be "The
British Foreign Office and the
United States Department of
State." Under the auspices of the
Department of History, the lec-
ture will feature a comparison of
organizations and methods of the
two countries.

p.m.,

Subscribe
to The
IMichigan Daily

KEPLER
.. formulated planetary laws

CERS
ORATED

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(Continued from Page 4)
Elizabeth City, North Carolina-Asst.
Band Director.
Elk Rapids, Michigan - First-Second
Grade.
Flat Rock, Michigan (Wayne County)
--Kindergarten.
Flint, Michigan (Beecher High
School) - History/Sociology/Geogra-
phy.
Flint, Michigan (Hoover School) -
Football Coach/English, or Commer-
cial/English; Math.
Grosse Pointe, Michigan - Elemen-
tary Music.
Livonia, Michigan - All Elementary
Grades; Junior High English/Social
Studies; Junior High Math/Science;
Junior High Girls Counselor; Senior
High Driver Training.
Pinckney, Michigan - Math/Science;
Home Economics; English.
Romulus, Michigan -- High Counse-
lor.
Roseville, Michigan - Kindergarten;
1st grade, 3rd grade.
St. Clair shores, Michigan (Lakeview
Schools) - Kindergarten; Elementary
Art.r
St. Louis, Michigan-Library/English.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.

YWCA, Decature, Ill., has a position
open for an assistant in the Health
Education Dept. The applicant should
be a college graduate, be qualified to
teach swimming, and have some skill
in other recreational activities.
City of Los Angeles, Calif., announces
openings for Civil Engineer Assist., and
for Traffic Engineering' Assist. No test
or interview required.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Bldg., ext. 371.
Summer Placement:
The meeting of the Summer Place-
ment Service will be held on Wed.,
Dec. 12, at the Michigan Union, Room
3-G, from 9 to 4:30. There will be jobs
for men and women in industry, camps
and resorts.,

physics were no longer considered
separate entities but ratherI
branches of the same science.
A logical effect of this univer-
sality can be used to dispel a pop-
ular misconception of today.

GALILEO
...discoverer of Jupiter's Moons

(Leader In o1l Hydraulics)
Extends An Invitation To
Students Majoring In Engineering & Science
To Explore Employment Opportunities
In Engineering, Research, Sales
And Manufacturing With
The World's Leading Manufacturer
Of Oil Hydraulic Equipment
Our Representative Will Be
On Your Campus
F R IDAY,
DECEMBER 14
See Your Placement Office
To Arrange An Appointment
VICKERS
THE LEADING NAME
IN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS

S
F

v

DO YOU WEAR GLASSES?
See the New Type, Tiny,
Plastic, Invisible, Fluidless
CONTACT LENSES
Safe and practical for work and play. Write or phone for a free
booklet about contact lenses or drop in for a free demonstration.
BETTER VISION CENTER
706 Wolverine Bldg.-4th and Washington Sts.
Ann Arbor Phone NO 8-6019

+Z

1Li

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Personnel Requests:
A local store needs men and womer
for temporary and permanent work
salesand department managers.
E. I. DuPont de Nemours, Flint, Mich
igan, is looking for a man for the post
tion of accountant.
Hdqs., Air Materiel C o m m a nd
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohi
needs actuaries for work involving th
application of actuarial methods an
techniques to supply and maintenanc
problems on aircraft equipment.
Carr, Adams & Collier Co., Dubuqu
Iowa, has an opening as a project en
gineer for a man with a degree i
Arch., Industrial Design or Arch. Engr
This firm manufactures building prod
ucts, window units, doors, and mu:
tiple use cabinets.
Jeffrey-Fell Co., Buffalo, N.Y., need
a man about thirty with a degree i
pharmacy. This company is in the su
gical, medical, and pharmaceutical sup
ply field.

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12-52
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Charms and bracelets also available in sterling and in gold filled . .. priced from $2
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December 14

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CAMPUS SALE
December 12, and 13
10 A.M.-4 P.M.
Diag - Engine Arch - Union

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