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December 09, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-09

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I TWO-PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN (DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1958

TWO-PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, DECEM~BER 9,1956

ALBERT E. WARNHOFF:
For 30c .. . Try our malts and Real 'Santa' Bright(
sh k s ...finest on c m u By ROSE PERLBERG. -.x
ByhROSE PERLcaRpus/ "So that night I go to bed and1
This is the story of Ann Arbor's think about those children and
'Saint Nick' - of a man who pretty soon I think up a new de-
would "rather see a child's eyes sign for a toy."
shine than have a million dollars."
Our super hamburger for 30c For 53 of his 67 years, Albert E. Designs on Jig-Saw
Warnhoff has been "making chil- At 5 a.m., he's up and working
dren's bright and wonderful out the thought on a jig-saw. The
dream a reality" - the legend of new creation, approved by Mrs.
Santa Claus. Warnhoff ("I always ask Mama
In a cramped and cluttered what she thinks") is then tried
ii1lil e7A7l mri m17 mmJi77 mmitll'5 i 37workshop - some six by eight out by neighborhood children. It's
feet, he has turned out over 29,000 success depends upon their reac-
toys which have been given to tion," he confided.
Fine candy for C hristm as more than 100,000 underprivileged Warnhoff specializes in small
N -Tandhandicapped children all over movableanimals, in addition to
LID theSE- IBET- HTM Nountry the standard cradles, dolls and
Begins at Early Age rocking horses.
"Blind children just love any-
beganwEhen Wrnhoff was thing that moves," he says with
a youngster of 14, living in Ann abodsie onigt ak
Arbor. He said, "It was mostly j packet with hundreds of the toys
farmsthen and everyone was very and patterns for more.
poor." "A little neighbor girl was ThSatCluwiot i-
sick with diphtheria," he recalled. The Santa Claus without whis-
"I made her a cradle and doll," kers produces his gifts by a mass
"The doctor said my work did production technique concentrat-
more than his medicine. He told ng on one type until he has
Calling me to 'keep up the good work.',, made enough and then switching
Warnhoff has been following
the doctor's orders ever since. Toys Made of Plywood
All M en Incentive for the 1800 toys They are all made of plywood,
jij s"eo * . * made this year comes when the stacks of which clutter the tiny
fatherly carpenter-by-trade "San- paint-spattered workshop and
ta," who worked 43 years for lum- keep the Warnhoff car out of the
ber companies, visits places like garage.e
the State School for the Blind, in The Toyland 'magician' feels
th SLansing. cthat this material is "the strong- r
"It's when I see suffering that est and lasts the longest." d
SSTA G N w ui I realize how well off I am - and When the little ducks, dogs and c
I want to do anything I can to horses receive their final coat of i
make them happier," he says. paint and Warnhoff's "lady help-a
Wednesday, Dec. 12
n
NN
S9COLLIN 9A SPECIAL GIFT isn't special unless the size is
'l)State and LibertyI
IMn. ...Wed. --Fri. 9:30-8:-30 right. Undecided about her Christmas gift? At
Tues. -Thurs - Sat. 9:30-5:30 I Collins you will find the right gift. Our salespeople it
HERSI are trained to help you with suggestions. Just jot
~HERS
HEIGHT - WEIGHT - down her sizes on this chart and visit us while oura
stocks are complete.n
1 r Sizes to Remember s
~Dress I Blouse IIg
t
1 1Coat I I Sweater I°
Shoes II Nightie I IL
Gloves I Slip I
Hose Bra r
Ir
Skirt I IRobe I .
STATE AND LIBERTY -Daily-John Hirtzei
-- - ---- LOCAL SAINT NICK-Albert E. Warnhoff adds a plywood horse
to his supply of finished toys. He will personally distribute them
to children in University, St. Joseph Mercy and Ypsilanti State
e y mCI S L m SC i S 3 S I YS Y Hospitals and Michigan Children's Home.d
t
Special Attraction Monday and Tuesdays
GL SS M0 0GR HM I G
3Speaker
A MFMAM TABLE RADIO
FEATURING
See Mr. Chadwick monogram your order p
HIGH FIDELITY FM SOUND,

while you Wait'
A.r ..
Monogrammed to your order
..K, r I4 xL
Moddl Y832 SUPER-SYMPHONAIRE o
Handsomely styled in grained Mahogany Prced fro
finish. Dial and tuning indicator of brilliant"49.95 to 119.95
.2 "rmangod" Also in gralned Blond Oak aeot
i color finish.
IT'S A FACT...High Fidelity FM broadcasts are lost un-
less the set has a frequency response of up to 15,000 cps
:. _ 'on FM; otherwise you miss the full beauty of High Fi-
delity FM sound. Now...Zenith brings you a table radio
101/ ounce Old Fashion 12 ounce that fully captures the brilliant, thrilling beauty of High
A HR T A G FFidelity FM broadcasts. 3 speakers fill your room with
F::t {{{(( rich, glorious FM sound. Built-in Wavemagnet@ Antenna
brings in AM stations sharp and clear. It's America's
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A CHRISTMAS GIFT R
WIT HEnRSONAL T C 3 BIG REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD HEAR
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-H TTHE SUPER-SYMPHONAIRE BEFORE YOU BUYI
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Students Set
ens Children's Lives For Holiday
__________Festivities

-Daiy--oonn irtzei
FINISHING TOUCHES--Ann Arbor's Santa Claus applies a coat
of shellac to a movable duck which he designed and made him-
self. In 53 years he has made over 29,000 toys to bring Christmas

cheer to 100,000 underprivileged children.
ers" from Ann Arbor and sur- and othe
ounding areas finish dressing derprivil
dolls and tuck bedding into the "You s
cradles, Warnhoff is ready to step he beam
nto the role of "Santa", aided by really th
a false beard, a red suit and some they go
pillows. Wtih a
Trucks Help Out probably
Helped by trucks from National Michigar
motor companies, he personally Warnh
distributes the toys to children "After a
n University Hospital, St. Joseph record a
Mercy and Ypsilanti State Hospi- spirit of
als, Michigan ° Children's Home happy."

er institutions for the un-
eged and handicapped.
should see those children,"
ns, eyes sparkling. "They
pink it's Santa Claus and
wild.'
a sly smile, he boasts, "I'm
the most hugged man in
n-by children of course!"
hofft never sells a toy -
all, that would spoil my
s Santa's helper and the
giving to making people

By ELAINE HUGHES
University school students from
nursery age through high school
are preparing enthusiastically for
the imminent holiday season. .
Festive showcases and bulletin
boards exhibit the ever-exciting
symbols of Christmas. Large un-
trimmed Christmas trees will soon
be erected.
Of the school Christmas pro-
gram, paramount in importance is
the annual Christmas Assembly.
It will include student caroling
and the presentation of "The Lit-
tlest Angel."
Students are rehearsing for a
music program tobe presented by
the instrumental classes. The high
school seniors will sponsor their
annual Christmas dance in honor
of University School alumni.
Caroling
This year students will present
their traditional caroling program
through the halls. Each class
chooses its own Christmas song
and entertains other classes at
intervals throughout the day.
The individual classes will have
their separate Christmas parties
as well as expressing their charity
by collecting canned food for local
needy families. Some high school
students also are repairing toys
and will donate them to the child-
ren's ward of University Hospital.
Students are enthused about
their activities. Dave Underwood
and Martha Drouyor feel that the
Christmas program is worth while
because of the high level of parti-
cipation.
Lauds Program
Underwood lauded the program
because "all students can join it
and feel welcome." Miss Drouyor
explained that the program is gen-
eral in scope and acceptable to
students of all religions.
The sixth grade presents a typi-
cal picture of preparation for the
holidays. Their classroom bulletin
board announces, "Let's Celebrate
Christmas in Greece, Spain, Sicily,
France, and the Philippine Is-
lands." The students ambitiously
are making pillows, lamps, mo-
biles, dollhouses, and "tight wads"
(a kind of coin purse) for mem-
bers of their families.
Under the direction of Mr. Dan-
iel Moore, their teacher, the sixth
grade will present "'Scrooge" to
the student body. They are mak-
ing their own scenery, costumes
and even smoke bombs to accom-
pany the appearance of ghosts in
the play.
Learning Experience
Mr. Moore stated, "We are not
after the finished product, but
rather the rich learning experi-
ence."
Mr. William Mills, assistant di-
rector of University School, ex-
plained that the Christmas pro-
gram emphasizes holiday customs
of people all over the world and
not just those of our own country.
He has integrated the program
so that it includes all students
He said, "The more participa-
tion by each individual within a
group, the more appreciation and
understanding we shall have of
the total purpose of the activities.
Students are not just spectators,

a

t

Yuletide Season Brings Rash
Of Christmas Novelty Tunes

.i

By JAMES BOW
"I won't get nothing for Christ-
mas," a small boy cries, "'Cause I
was a bad boy last year."
And,- once again the holiday
eason is accompanied by a back-
ground of music, from childish
unes to religious hymns.
As with merchants, the Christ-
mas season is a special season for
ongwriters, a chance to confront
he customer with new novelties as
well as bring out the old standbys
reserved for the gala season.
A little girl singing "I saw Mom-
my kising Santa Claus" was one
of the favorite lyrics of past years.
Frosty and Rudolph
"Frosty the Snowman" and "Ru-
dolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"
seem to be old standbys which are
returning again this year.
If adults may find the repiti-
tion of old Christmas tunes a
ittle more tiring each year, the
kiddies don't seem to mind.
In fact, Rudolph Reindeer is
still glowing in plastic toys in
dime stores and even in decora-
tions on city streets.
Children may tire a bit of these

tunes too, but the voice of a little
boy or girl bubbling over with
anticipation of a big haul on
Christmas morning seems to make
up for their frequent repetition.
Novelty Tunes
Adults, too, have their Christ-
mas novelty tunes, those tender
love ballads, sung in the style
popular that year, but managing
to include Christmas somewhere.
Vocalists, singing something like
"I love you, won't you come home
for Christmas?" or "It won't be
the same without you" are ap-
pearing this season.
White Christmas
The old favorites like "White
Christmas" and the carols com-
plete the recipe of Christmas mu-
sic.
Some like their Christmas music
toned-down, others like it jazzed-
up, but played either way listeners
are sure to hear their favorite
tunes from radios and loudspeakers
from Maine to California.
One can't go shopping during
the Christmas season withoute
hearing these tunes, whether re-
laxing or merely adding to the
pre-Christmas confusion. -

4

4,

4

4

PRE-CHRISTMAS-SALE
of TYPEWRITERS and NEW PORTABLES

,

Were
Were
Were
Were
Were
Were

129.85
131.57
109.81
84.96
89.95
74.50

. . . now 95.85
. . . now 98.85
. . . now 84.45
. . . now 65.00
. . . now 69.95
* . . now 59.95

.4

OVERBECK'S BOOKSTORE
1216 South University

TRUNK SHOWING
of nantucket naturals . .
Thursday, December 13
by MR. RUSSELL AAGARD
10 A.M. to 4 p.M.
you're .so smart
to give blouses!
make gift giving easy as saying
"Ship'n Shore"! everyone loves to get
these lovely-to-live-in blouses ...
r rh~ -rrnt~ct:A ..-.- d.r

55 Y. .
4 . ::r "njA

I'2

A
x

gay array of newest i eas in easy-care
fashion fabrics - plus the famous
soft tailoring that says quality
in every way . . . sizes 28 to 40.
in the casual shop . . . 2.95 to 4.95

_,

.1 £ ~ i. N'.

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