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December 07, 1956 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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PRIDAY, IDECEMBER 7,1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Literary College Integrates New Science Program

By DIANE LABAKAS
istry," Prof. Anderson said. "Such
Four new science courses have a course should be part of every
been adopted by th University ini student's education."
an attempt to liberalize the Liter-sn
ary College curriculum. Physics
Physics 20. Concepts and Meth-

philosophy and society. The role tributions to science by notable}

of major scientists, eighteenthj
century physical science, the de-
velopment of evolution. and theI
history of scientific institutions
and education are discussed.
The second semester, History

Americans.
*The goal of the course is relat-J
ing science and the humanities byI
illustrating the development of
scientific ideas and their influ-
ence on the philosophical, cultur-

The courses, designed for non-
science majors. "meet a real stu-
dent need," Dean James Robert-
son of the Literary School said.
The courses are available to stu-
dents who have completed a regu-
lar year's work in a laboratory
sequence.
"Recent studies by the Standing
Committee on Curriculum in con-
junction with the Natural Science!
Study Committee revealed that!
many students do not take physi-
cal science courses because of
their fear of mathematics and the
level of competition," Dean Rob-
ertson declared.
Chemistry 9 and Physics 20
have therefore been devised to
give the student an opportunity to
find out what physical sciences
are like. These courses supplement
Botany 3, Zoology 38, Geology 99,
and Astronomy 30.
Chemistry
Chemistry 9 is a four-hour
course consisting of four class
periods and three hours of labo-
ratory work. The course is taught
by Prof. Leigh Anderson, head of
the chemistry department.
Designed for students with no
previous chemistry in high school
or college, Chemistry 9 attempts
to relate chemistry to home econ-
omics, geology, minerology, and
other scientific fields related.
"The course is an appreciation
and background of chemistry
rather than a knowledge of chem-

..

ods of Physics, will be offered next
semester under the direction ofj
Prof. Noah Sherman. The course,
is directed toward Literary Col-
lege students whose principal in-
terests are in learning the meth-
ods and achievements of physics
and its role in understanding the
world,
The contents of the course will
include fundamental concepts in
Newtonian mechanics, Electro-
magnetic theory, Quantum phy-
sics, and the principles of rela-
tivity, Only prerequisites neces-
sary are high school algebra and
geometry.
"It is hoped that students will
enjoy the beauty and intellectual
adventure associated with scienti-
fic insight as well as acquiring a
sound background for a reason-
able evaluation of the scientific
and pseudo-scientific information
which is so important in modern
living," Prof. Sherman remarked.
History
Another of the new liberal arts
science courses is History of Sci-
ence, now taught by Edward Lurie
of the History department. History
199 was initiated as a three hour,
two-semester course through the
interdisciplinary cooperation of
the History department and the
Natural Science Study Committee.
The first semester, history 199a,
deals with the study of the ori-
gins and development of modern'
science and tis relationship with

I

199b, stresses both the role of sci- al. and historical aspects of the
Western world," Dr. Lurie ex-
ence in the history of the UnitedpWer.
States and the general history of Philosophy
western science. Subjects discussed Philosophy 51, Science and Hy-j
include the status of science and pothesis, will be taught in the fall
technology beginning with the semester in 1957 by Prof. Arthur
seventeenth centruy, the develop- Burk. The course is divided into
ment of national scientific insti- two parts, deductive and induc-
tutions, and the careers and con- tive logic and the study of quanti-

a
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1

tative science. Examples are
drawn from the history of sci-
ence from the Greeks through
Newton.
Philosophy 51 is a four hour
course and may be used to satis-
fy the science requisite. A two se-
mester sequence of college labor-
atory science, high school algebra
and plane geometry are required
for the course.
"The aim of the course is to
teach students about scientific
method and inference with parti-
cular stress on the quantitative
method in physics and as-
tronomy," Prof. Burk said,

LET THERE BE SNOW-Winter means ski time for college students all over the country. One of
the activities of the University Ski Club will include trips to the ski slope at Peach Mountain.
Ski Club To Use U Slope On Peach Mt.

By SUSAN KARTUS
Because of the ingenuity of the
Ski Club, the University is the first
college in the state of Michigan to
have its own ski slope.
Peach Mountain, the site of the
slope, is the highest mountain in
the southern part of the state.
Located 18 miles from Ann Arbor,
it is near Portage Lake. The ter-
rain of the slope varies and con-
sequently both beginning and ad-
vanced skiers may take advantage
of the 660 foot slope.
The slope was discovered last
year when the faculty advisor of
the Ski Club took a trip through
the state to find a suitable loca-
tion for skiing. He not only dis-
covered Peach Mountain, but he
also found out it was owned by the
University's Natural Resource de-
partment. Request to use the land
was granted.
Notices
Roger Williams Fellowship, tree trim-
ming party, 8 p.m., Guild House.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, tree decorating and caroling
party, 7:30 p.m. Guild House.
* * s
Union Bridge Club, meeting, 7:30
p.m ., Union.
Unitarian Student Group, skating
party, 8 p.m., Coliseum, transportation
from the Union and Stockwell at 7:45
p.m.
Newman Club, winter carnival, 7 p.m.
Father Richard Center.
* * 4
Hillel, Sabbath evening services, 7:30
p.m., Hillel,
# NAACP, campus benefit dance, "Noel
Nocturne," 9-12 p.m.. Saturday, League.
P1 Lambda Theta, initiation, 2:36
p.m., Saturday, Rackham Assembly
Hall,
Union, experienced orientation lead-
ers who wish to be orientation leaders
in February may sign up from 2-5.
pm., Union Student Offices.

This fall, 30 people equipped regular trips to Aspen for a week
with rakes and axes cleared away of skiing may easily and inexpen-

the mountain's extensive vegeta-
tion.

I

Prohibit Buildnig
The Natural Resource Depart-
ment has prohibited the erection
of a warming house or ski tow on
the slope. John Smith, '57E, the
club's president says that the lack
of a ski tow is not a disadvantage
because the five minute climb up
the hill serves as a "built-in
muscle builder," increasing the
strength of the legs.I
Smith added the club is anxious
to increase its membership be-
cause more people provide bet-
ter opportunities for good skiing.,
"With 200 people in the club

I

sively be arranged."
Ski Club Activities
Presently, ski club activities in-
clude ski trips up into Northern
Michigan, free instruction for be-
ginners, and an opportunity for
advanced skiers to compete for
positions on the five-man Michi-
gan Ski team. The team enters the
Michigan Intercollegiate Ski As-
sociation racing competition at
Boyne Mountain each year.
When Smith took over the job
as president of the club, member-
shp totaled eight active members.
Presently there are 65 members
which Smith hopes "is only the
beginning" of increased growth.
He added they feel "fortunate in
acquiring the slope," because
Michigan is limited in its skiing
terrain.
"All we need now," he contin-
ued, "is a good snow and we'll
really be set."

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Russians Set
Conduct Rules
A monthly magazine, "Family
and School", which has taken on
the job of telling Russians what
their manners ought to be, has
listed the following rules of con-
duct according to the United
Press.
x) At a dress party, dress, suit,
blouse, shirt, jacket and tie must
be in tone. "It isn't correct to wear
clothes of different colors which
make people look like parrots."
2) A man must always help a
lady remove her coat and open
the door for her.
3) At the end of a party, a young
man may escort a young lady
home, but should first offer to
accompany "older people, inval-
ids ,teachers if they are present."
4) While descending a stair-
case, the man goes ahead and the
lady follows. If they come to a
puddle in the street, the man
crosses first, then offers the lady
a helping hand across.
5) On entering an apartment, a
guest doesn't greet the host un-
til he takes off his hat, coat, ga-
loshes, and, of course, the gloves--
left one first!

F

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TONIGHT AT 8

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC present
HUMPERDINCK'S OPERA
HAN EL AND GRETEL

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English Translation by JOSEF BLATT
$1.25

LYDIA MEN DELSSOH N THEATRE

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