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December 02, 1956 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-02

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SUNDAY, DECEM 3ER 2,1959

THE MCMGAN DAILY

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SUt~DAY, DECEMBER 2,1956 TIW MU1I1~AN 1~AflV

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Journalism
"Besides a flare for words, the
most important requirement to
become a successful reporter, is
a liking for people," Laureen
Pringle, fashion editor of the De-
troit News said yesterday.
A former Associated Press cor-
respondent, Mrs. Pringle called a
college education beneficial for a
budding journalist because of the
background and mental disci-
pline it gives.
She described a woman's place
on a newspaper as essential be-
cause, "no man can do what a
woman can in a story involving
human relations."
Mrs. Pringle said that the high-
est compliment a man can pay a
woman reporter is to say that she
is a good newspaperwomain."
Desk opportunities for women
are few, she added. Her own copy
desk work for a Detroit news-
paper was described as a result
of the war, which caused a man-
power shortage.
Librarian Work
"Every day in a library is dif-
ferent," stated Miss Louis Lage,
chief librarian of the Eli Lilly
Company and graduate of the
University School of Library Sci-
ence.
She 'remarked that a librarian's
personality should include: "quick
intelligence, ready adaptability, a
sense of humor and an interest
in human beings."
In order to qualify for a li-
brarian's position one must have
a college degree and a broad cul-
tural background in English, his-
tory and the natural sciences. A
year of a foreign language would
also be of aid to the future li-
brarian.
Miss Lage stated that there are
many types of librarian work a-
vailable to the woman graduate.
The field of special librarianship
is an interesting and unlimited
one. The librarian is the biblio-
graphic brains of her clients. She
must know the literature of/ all
fields and where to get the in-
formation wanted at short notice.
The children's librarian is the
warm human link between the
child and the rows of books on
the library shelves. This librarian
must win the confidence and af-
fection of the child through her
own sincere feelings.
Personnel
"Among the 28,000 Michigan
Bell Telephone employees approx-
imately 60%/ are women," com-
mented Miss Virginia Phillips, col-
lege relations representative of the
personnel department.
Michigan Bell employs about
5,000 management employees of
which 1,500 are women. Most of
the personnel workers don't begin

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cribed her field's activities as
consisting of "physical modalities
such as light, heat, or exercise
as contrasted to drug therapies.
Conditions involving impair-
ments of muscles, for example,
sprains, arthritis and muscular
spasms respond best, she ex-
plained.
Miss Wilson remarked that phy-
sical therapists are making head-
way with cerebral palsy cases.
"With exercise, we can strengthen
nmuscle groups and with special
education, develop potentialities;
helping the patient to do things
ordinarily impossible."
Physical therapists working
with muscular dystrophy patients,
she said " can't touch the dis-
ease process," but "through exer-
cise and keeping the patient ac-
tive, some rehabilitation can be
started."
Publishing
"If you like books and want to
be near them, choose publishing,"
said Fred Wieck, director of the
University Press.
Wieck's advice to a college grad-
uate seeking a job with a pub-
lishing house is . first to learn
typing and shorthand, and then
to become familar with graphic
art procedures.'
The applicant should also know
how to proofread and should be
exposed to the "Manual of Style."
The large publishing houses in
New York, Boston and Phila-
delphia, as well as university
presses throughout the country,
have available positions, but as-
pirants must expect to start from
the bottom and work up. Starting
pay is very low, but there is'"op-
portunity for advancement.
There are more jobs open with-
in the smaller houses and once in
the business, there is a constant
interchange. Publishing is a ca-

reer in which women may reach
the top.
Radio and TV
The person with the ability "to
dream up a different approach
to the same old beat," is the one
who has the best chance of
surviving the "cut-throat compe-
tion" that characterizes a career
in radio or television, commented
Fran Haris.
Speaking from 25 years,
of experience in the busi-
ness that "produces ulcers," Miss
Harris described some of the not-
so often mentioned aspects of a
job in radio or television.
As Women's Editor of Detroit's
WWJ radio and TV station, Miss
Harris feels that the greatest set-
back to the profession 'is the er-
ratic, uncertain. confusing life
of the performer, especially on
television."
The free lancer, she said con-
tinually faces the prospect of
being without a job after each 13-
week contract is up. "The pay
may sound fantastic," she re-
marked, "but it is balanced by
the instability of the work.",
Miss Harris feels that the best
way for a newcomer to enter the
field is to get experience on a
small network and gradually work
up to the larger groups.
Retailing
"Retailing is an exciting and
glamorous field," stated Miss Ruth
Dunn, personnel counselor of the
ready-to-wear division of Hud-
son's Department Store in De-
troit.
Miss Dunn, who taught retailing
in the Detroit high school system,
remarked that, "there are five
major fields in retailing which
include merchandizing, personnel,
advertising, operating and con-
trol."

A person entering this profes-
sion should have a good know-
ledge of people and trends in(
buying plus having much energy
and a flair for this type of work."
She emphasized that the hours
are long and there is very little
leisure time-
One of the advantages of re-
tailing," is that a person can re-
turn to the field after being away
from it for several years," stated
Miss Dunn.
When interviewing perspective
employees, Miss Dunn looks for
persons who have the ability to
get along with others. She stated
that in a department store one
must have emotional stability be-
cause, "there is much pressure
and tension to overcome." She al-
so stressed that women should be
of a better than average intelli-
gence and have imagination and
originality.
Salaries range from $5,000 to
$25,000 a year for people in mer-
chandizing and from $4,000 to
$10,000 in other forms of re-
tailing.
Social Work
A young field with excellent op-
portunity for advancement lies
open to anyone who, "likes people,
gets satisfaction out of helping
someone improve himself and
lead a fuller life," stated Roberta
Torbell of the Detroit Department
of Public Health.
Speaking of a career in social
work, Miss Torbell said that a
masters degree in social work will
net a propective worker almost
any type of job he wants in the
field.
District superintendent of pub-
lic welfare in Detroit, Miss Torbell
is in charge of providing needed
relief to all people who have legal
settlement in Detroit.
She works with graduate stu-

dents in social work who are sup-
plementing class work with prac-
tical training in handling 10 to
15 cases a semester.
Basic to achieving success in
the field is, "the ability to under-
stand people and why they be-
have the way they do," according
to Miss Torbell.

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Pullover $21.95 - Cardigan $29.95

Tickets at:
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