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December 01, 1956 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-12-01

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1959

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~ATUILDAY, DECEMBER 1,1956

RELIGION, PSYCHIATRY MESH:
Dr. Dai Notes 'Happy Man'

MAIZE AND BLUE BUSES:
'U' Vehicles Dazzle Nation's Drivers;

42

Speech and Music Groups
To Stage'Hansel and Gretel'
Five performances of Humper-
dinck's famous opera, "Hansel and signed for the opera by Robin
dinc's amos oera HaselandCoon, Grad., and Albert center,
Gretel," will be presented by the
m '57. The new costumes are based
Department of Speech and the!

By SHIRLEY CROOG

I

i

Why does a man with two cars
in one garage, a huge account in
the bank and a beautiful wife
want to commit suicide?
Dr. Bingham Dai, professor in
psychiatry at Duke Univeersity,
said yesterday that the root of
man's unhappiness lies in his atti-
tude towards his fellow man.
Speaking on the topic of "Science
and Wisdom" to a large audience
in Aud. A, Angell Hall, Dr. Dai
noted that the prescription for
man's happiness may be found in
many of the teachings of Chris-
tianity, Buddhism and Confucian-
ism.
These teachings similarly re-
flect the findings of modern phy-
chiatry-a man's greatest problem
Is he doesn't know how to live.
"The happiest man is one who
has the abiilty to love others," the
visiting psychiatry professor,
schooled in sociology, philosophy,
psychiatry and the three religions
commented, "and the most un-
happy people are those "who are
stingy and too preoccupied with
themselves to give to others.:'
Compares Ethical Teachings
Dr. Dai compared the ethical
teachings of the three religions
which, in attempting to prescribe
for man a "way of living" turn out
to be a "psychological state." The
ideal way of living according to
the religions, Dr. Dai commented,
calls for humility, honesty and a
lack of aggressiveness, greed, envy
and pride. "In fact," Dr. Dai
added facetiously, "all the values
Americans emphasize are absent
in the ideal man of the religious
teachings."
The superior man, he continued,
has neither fear nor anxiety, for,
as Confucius taught, "he does not
find in himself that he has done
anything he shouldn't have done."
'U' To Host
State, JCC

Wy ROBERT JUNKER
The University's maize and blue
have dazzled the nation's motorists
from Wyoming to New York in the
last few years.
Buses painted in these tradi-
tional colors with the inscription,
"University of Miphigan," embla-
zoned on the sides have traveled
across the country as part of the
University's transportation . sys-
tem.
This system, operated by the l
Plant Department, includes in ad-
dition . to' 19 buses, some of which
are kept near the Army and Navy
ROTC building, a car pool of 24
station wagons and 57 sedans. A.
few of the cars are kept next to
the Plant Department building.
Pool Began During War
The pool was started during
World War II when gasoline ra-
tioning limited staff members'
travel in their own cars. The
University, however, was able to
obtain larger gas allowances, so it
began providing both gas and au-
tomobiles.
The car pool 'has grown from its
original three cars to a present
size of 81 vehicles. Trips usually
take these vehicles to Detroit or
other .nearby cities, and they are
also used to carry visiting digni-
taries from Willow Run airport
and nearby cities to central cam-
pus.
The cars are all low-priced
makes and they are replaced after
about three years use, during
which time they travel an average
distance of 60,000 miles each. Ac-
cidents have been rare and any
damage to the cars, which are all
insured, is repaired in the Univer-
sity shops.
Bus Service for Students
The part of the transportation
system which affects students
more directly -is the bus service.
Regular service to and from North
Campus now transports about
5,000 of the University community
each month. There is also a regu-
lar shuttle service between park-

music school Wednesday through
Saturday in the Lydia Mendels-'
sohn Theatre.
Evening performances are sched-
uled for 8 p.m. and a special mati-
nee for children at 2:30 p.m. Sat-
urday.
Prof. Joseph Blatt of the School
of Music is music director for the
production and Prof. Hugh Z.
Norton of the speech department
is stage director. Choreography
for the well-known dance of the
14 angels is the creation of Prof.
Esther E. Pease of the women's
physical education department.
An entire set of new German
peasant costumes has been de-

on the colors and styles of cloth-
ing used in the popular Hummel
figures.
Scenery for "Hansel and Gretel"
has been designed by David Lloyd,
Grad., associate director of the
production.
Tickets will be sold beginning 10
a.m. Monday at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre box office. Spe-
cial 75 cent student tickets will
be available for the Wednesday
and Thursday performances.
The Saturday matinee is open
to elementary school children in
grades one through eigPft, at 35
cents each in groups of 10 or more.
All seats are reserved.

-Daily-Larry Carbonelli
UNIVERSITY BUSES AWAIT PASSENGERS-These vehicles are
part of the fleet of buses operated by the Plant Department as the
University's transportation system.

4

-Daily-Larry Carbonelli
SCIENCE AND WISDOM-Dr. Bingham Dai of Duke University
compared the ethical teachings one of Christianity, Buddhism and
Confusisism and their relation to modern psychiatry in a lecture

yesterday.
The three religions all teach that
the ideal man not only thinks of
the feelings of other people but is
happy in the work he undertakes.
Citing Confucius again, Dr. Dai
said he found satisfaction because
"he was happy in his work and
forgot his worries, and because he
was happy in his studies, he for-
got his age."
Personal Interest in Subject
Dr. Dai, who presented the lec-
ture "out of personal interest" in
the merging ideas of science and
religion, noted that the concept
expressed in the Golden Fule of
"doing unto others as you would
have done unto you" found in all
three religions was now entering
into psychiatry. "The ego is not
as important as considering other
people," Dr. Dai added. In psycho-
analytic treatment, the search for
the source of one's hostilities not
only reduces them but permits the
individual searching for happiness
to see people as friendly, honest
and generous, he said.
Answering the rhetoric question
of what was the happy personality,
Dr. Dai cited from one of the
few studies of the normal per-
sonality that a happy man was
one who was able to "perceive
reality," was "autonomous, crea-
tive and independent," and had
a "wholesome sense of humor and
a continued freshness of appreci-
ation of nature."
Overcome Similar Problems
Both religion and psychiatry,

Approximately 150 representa-
tives of Junior Chambers of Com-
merce throughout Michigan will
participate in an all-day leader-
ship training conference tomorrow
at the University.
Under-the auspices of the speech
department, group sessions will be
held in several auditoriums, stu-
dios and classrooms in Angell Hall.
The delegates will witness dem-
onstrations and receive individual
intstruction in the fields of public
speaking, radio, television, parlia-
mentary procedure and conference
methods.

Dr. Dal said, attempt to overcome
similar problems: in religion, he
added, "it is called the problem of
evil, in psychiatry, the problem of
complexes." Dr. Dai noted that
Buddha taught his followers to
overcome unnecessary suffering
by . recognizing that certain suf-
ferings in birth, death and disease
were inevitable and the less one
worried about them the less one
suffered. Further, a "craving of
desires can be destroyed -by follow-
ing the right behavior, the right
efforts and right thoughts."
In psychiatry, a person may
overcome his anxieties by being
aware and unafraid of his im-
pulses and thereby not build up
anxiety-causing defenses.
Dr. Dai was born in a Chinese
village in Southern France and
went to a missionary school in
China.. He studied sociology at
the University of Chicago and
attended the Psychoanalytic In-
stitute there for his training in
psychiatry.
He returned to practice psychi-
Ary in China and came back to
the United States where he is
presently training students in
psychoanalytic work at Duke Uni-
versity.
Law Students
To Compete
John Feldeux, '57L, and Robert
Steele, '57L, wil represent the Uni-
versity Law School in the finals
of the National Moot Court Com-
petition Dec. 22 in New York- City.
Feldeux and Steele defeated a
team from Ohio State University
Nov. 15 which gave them the right
to represent the Michigan-Ohio
Region in the competition.
The competition is sponsored
by the New York City Bar Asso-
ciation. The topic to be discussed
is the legal method used in de-
termining insanity in present
times.

ing lots on the edge of the city and
the main campus twice daily.
Buses are also used for depart-
mental field trips, carrying ath-
letic teams or the Band to various
cities, and tranporting visitors at
conventions around the campus.
The buses have traveled to New
York City;the Upper Peninsula,
Chicago, and even to the Univer-
sity surveying and geology camp
at Jackson Hole, Wyo.
Bus service was started by the
University shortly after World War
II when the housing shortage
made it necessary to place some
students in accommodations at
Willow Run Village. The buses
made the 12 mile trip about 15
times daily.
As housing and activity expand
on North Campus, bus service and
the number of vehicles used will'
have to be increased to meet the
new demand, according to Plant'
Department officials.
An example of this increasing
demand is the fact that three
large buses were added to the fleet
this summer. The pool will con-
tinue to expand as the University
community continues to grow.

Sunday

Come

to Church

.

Editor Plans
Speech Here.I
Norman E. Isaacs, managing
editor of the Louisville Times, will
speak on "Selling Newspaper
Readers Short" at 3 p.m. Dec. 3
in Rackham Auditorium under
the auspices of the Department
of Journalism.
Isaacs has successively worked
on the Indianapolis Star, became
managing editor of the Indiana-
polis Times at 26 years old, and
was chief editorial writer of the
Indianapolis News.
He was managing editor of, the
St. Louis Star-Tines before tak-
ing his present position.
Isaacs has received a "service to
journalism" award from Font-
bonne College, St. Louis Univer-
sity, and was awarded the South-
ern Methodist Universi-ty medal
for service to freedom of the press.

Organization'
Notices
Hillel, Sabbath Services, 9 am., Hillel.
* * * !
Congregational and Disciples Stu-
dent Guild, study group, 9:20 a.m., Sun-
day, Guild House.
Congregational and Disciples Stu-
dent Guild, International Night pro-
gram, 7 p.m., Sunday, Congregational
Church, speaker: Dr. Davis.
** *
Graduate Outing Club, toboganning
and supper, 2 p.m., Sunday, Rackham.
* * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship, lec-
ture, 4 p.m.. Sunday, speaker: Dr. Mar-
tin. "can Ultimate Truth be Found
Empirically?", Lane Hall.
University of Michigan Folk Dancers,
dancing, 7:30-10 p.m., Monday, Lane
Hall.
Undergraduate Math Club, meeting,
7:30 p.m., Tuesday, 3201 Angell Hall.
Speaker: Prof. Coe.

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Continued from Page 2)
Ch'ing Porcelain Fragments from Ar-
chaeological Sites in Central and North
America."
Placement Notices
The following schools have vacancies
on their teaching staffs. They will not
be at the Bureau of Appointments to
interview at this time.
Bogota, Columbia, S.A. -- A limited
number of teaching fellowships are
available to American graduate stu-
dents in English, Spanish, Latin Am-
erican studies and Education, inter-
dents in English, Spanish, Latin Am-
Columbia. Fellows will be expected to
teach English as a foreign language
to adults for approximately fifteen
hours weekly during the academic year.
Their remaining time will be free for
research or classesbatbsuch local in-
stitutions as the Biblioteca Naional,
University Javeriana, Universidad Na-
cional, Universidad de los Andes, Museo
Nacional and others.
San Juan, Puerto Rico (Antilles Con-
solidated Schools) - All elementary
Grades; English; Social Science; Math;
Science; Chemistry; Physics; Librar-
iani Elementary and Secondary Vocal
Music.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.o
Personnel Requests:
United Aircraft, Pratt Whitney Dirv.,
Hartford, Conn., needs a Librarian with
a degree in Library Science and a scien-
tific background. Positions are avail-
able in Hartford or in Florida.
City of Flint, Michigan, is currently
recruiting for the positions of Senior
City Planning Assistant and Public
Health Nurses. The City Planner must
have a B.S. in City Planning, Land-
scape Architecture or related fields and
three years of experience. The Public
Health Nurses must.have graduated
from an accredited school of Nursing,a
have at least 15 semester hours credit
in Public Health Nursing, and at least
one year of experience in Public Health
Nursing.
Dept. of the Ni 'y, Civilian Recruit-!
ing, offers employment opportunities to
Engrs., Architects, Chemists, Electron-
ic Sceintists, Geophysicists. Mathema-
ticians, Metallrrgists, Physicists, Tech-
nologists, Accountants, and Adminis-
trators and Clerks. Positions are in
the U.S& and overseas.
McCormck-Mathers Publishing Co.,
Public School Div.. Wichita, Kansas, is
looking for a man between thirty and

to all qualified citizens of the U.S.,
and applications are accepted contin-
uously. An examination is also an-
nounced for Mathematicians to be Jr.
Actuaries. Exam is open to all quali-
fied 'citizens of the U.S., and the dead-
line for applications is Dec. 28, 1956.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 371.

for your eating pleasure...
PIZZA at t1e Dl Rio
BEER - WINE - also takeout
122 W. Washington Closed Tuesday

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GERMAN CLUB
Sponsors
Goethe's Faust (Part 1)
Drama (in German)
Presented by Deutsche Buehne, Detroit
December 4th, 7:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor High School Auditorium

i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Loucks and Mr. D. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone.
9:45 A.M. Bible class studies. I Samuel.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service. "Is God With Us"
by Dr. Loucks. ,
6:45 P.M. Christmas Program.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 10:45: Worship Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "Advent-The Approach
to Bethlehem." (Communion in 9:30 service)
6:00 Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Club, Sup-
per and Program. Three talks on the history,
the music, and the tfieology of Handel's
MESSIAH.
WEDNESDAY
8:00: Chapel Assembly Meeting.
FRIDAY
8:15: Married Couples Meeting.
SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Road
Reverend Phillip L Schenk
Phone; NO 2-4663
10:00 A.M. Sunday Services.
10:00 A.M. Church School.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10.45 A.M. Meetings for Worship.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends Meeting
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 1 1 :00 AM., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 A.M. and 10:45 A.M Worship. Dr. Merrill
P. Abbey will speak.
9:30 to 10:30 A.M. Two discussion groups. "The
History of the Hebrew People" and "The
Bible and Christian Living."
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Visiting in
church members' homes Discussion on -"What
Makes a Christian Home."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services-Holy
Cam munion
10:00 A.M Bible Study
6:00 P.M. Supper
7:00 P.M. "The Harvest Years"-Film
WEDNESDAY
9:30 P.M. Vesper Service and Holy Communion
THE CH URCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays 10:00 AM. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30
P.M.
Wednesdays 7:30 P.M. Bible Study. Ministers,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Hearld of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays 5:00 to 5:30 P.M.
For transportation to Service-Dial NO 3-5134.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 AM.
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. Dr. Parr will preach
on "ROSES IN DECEMBER." Coffee hour at
the close of the service.
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. Dessert and an in-

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor ,
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. "The Promise of
Things to Come." Sermon by Reverend Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Three Morning Services. 9:00, 10:30 and 12:00
noon
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "What We Believe and
Why."
11:30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Forum, "Directed or
Addressed-the University."
MONDAY
4-6 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat Pickett's apartment,
217 S. Observatory.
TUESDAY
4 :1 5 P.M. "Question Box" discussion, Pat Pick-
ett's apartment, 217 S. Observatory.
THURSDAY
4-6 P.M. Coffee Break Pat Pickett's apartment.
4:15 Bible Study at the League.
FRIDAY
6:30 P.M. Graduate Dinner.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowed by a Student Breakfast at. the Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper
7:00 P.M. Lecture Series Speaker will be Pro-
fessor Paul Spurlin of the University of Mich-
igan. His topic is "Churches of France and
Italy."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Ser'ice
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main St. Reading Room hours are Mon.,
'11:00 A,M. to 9:00 P.M. Tues.-Sat. 11:00
A.M. to 5 P.M.; and Sun. 2:30 to 4:30 PM.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Church School.
10 A.M Unitarian Adult Group-W dgar Glas of
Watling, Lerchen and Co., will discuss "in-
vestment Clubs."
11 A.M. Services of Worship. Rev. Edward H. Red.
man will speak on "What is Theology?"
11 A.M. Junior High LRY Group.
7 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Review and
evaluation of the Nov 30-Dec. 2 Eastern Mid-
west College Conference held in Pittsburgh,
Pa. Delegates just returned from the conference
will report to the group. Transportation avail-
able promptly at 6:45 from Lane Hall, Michi-
gan Union and Stockwell.
Friday Dec. 7: Annual Skating Party of the Stu-
dent Group. Transportation provided from the
church to the skating rink.

4

-4
t
'

"
"
"

Boersma Trave
Metzgers
Old German

Reserved Seat Tickets Now on Sale at:
el * 3909 Taylor S. Quad.* Pretzel Beil
* 2551 Alice Lloyd * Schwaben I
* 407 Martha Cook 0 108 Tappan

Inn
n Hall

HII FI STUDIO
1317 South University

EVERYTHING IN HI F1
COMPONENTS and KITS
Audiophile Net or Catalog Prices

$2.00 $1.50 $1.00
TICKETS WILL ALSO BE SOLD AT THE DOOR
Ei Chartered University Bus in front of Union 6:30 P.M.
J "-f
Make
I ,
-~ FOLLETT'S I
your Christmas
" _ Shopping "
ileadquarters
for"
BOOKS.. GAMES.. r. TOYS ."
MICHIGAN SOUVENIRSI
CARDS WRAPPINGS

i

OUR REPRESENTATIVES
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4TH
INTERVIEWING SENIORS
FOR THE FOLLOWING FIELDS:
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
METALIURGICAL FNGINFFRING

U,

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