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November 29, 1956 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1956-11-29

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1956

fiHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEI

Letter from Melbourne
... by ed gaguier
As Written to JIM BAAD
Before he left for Melbourne with the Canadian Olympic Team,
Michigan's master gymnast, Ed Gagnier, gave his solemn promise that
he would not forget The Daily.
After an anxious week the promise has been fulfilled with a
seven-page airmail letter crammed with on-the-spot information
Since the whole thing can not be reprinted, owing to lack of space,
the more interesting excerpts have been extracted..
Gagnier was asked if he would send some impressions of the Rus-
sian team once he had settled down at Olympic Village and here is
what he has to say:
"There are about 6000 athletes here now and we're all one big
happy family. The friendliest people in the Village are the Russians.
They are not able to speak English but they are still mixing with
everyone here and having a great time.
"I have been able to develop personal friendships with two of
the Russian gymnasts and they have certainly helped me in gaining
an added outlook on their country.
"Mr. Newman, my gymnastics coach at the games, can speak
Russian quite well. The other evening while in the recreation room
hall he spoke to a Russian diver for nearly three hours. The Russian
was very friendly and the discussion centered on living conditions in
each other's countries.
"Mr. Newman asked the Russian the following questions: 'How
long would one have to work in Russia for a pound of butter?' The
answer was about one-half an
hour. Next question was, 'How long
it would take to earn enough
money to buy a new automobile?'.
The reply was nine months.
"Mr. Newman then asked the
Russian if he was ordered to act
any special way while in the
Olympic Village. The Russian said
f: ....that he had received no orders and
that ,he (and the whole Russian
a team) had been given the freedom
of the Village and could do any-
thing they wished.
"The next question was, 'Could
the Russians leave their country
on their own?' The answer was
yes! When questioned as to why
so few did leave, the Russian re-
8 > plied that when his country's
ED GAGNIER money was changed to American
"one happy family" dollars one could not afford to
leave."
Switching subjects, Gagnier writes: "Getting back to the condi-
tions in the Village, we all have a big complaint about the weather.
The temperature is between 40 and 50 degrees most of the time and
it manages to rain at least once a day.
"The athletes that are having the most trouble working out are
those that can only train outdoors' Another disadvantage is that the
areas in which we are assigned to practice are spread out all over
the city of Melbourne. It sometimes takes as long as an hour to reach
our destination. We have special buses at our disposal, however.
"All the facilities and equipment here are first class. The food
is wonderful and there is no limit to how much we can eat.
"A final note of interest is that the seats to the swimming com-
petition are all sold out. (Gagnier's letter was written Nov. 22.) The
situation is so bad that only four athletes from each country will be
admitted to see the swimming in order to allow more seats for the
public.
"It's a beautiful pool, but it only seats 5,500 people. Crowds as
large as 5,000 who couldn't get tickets have been crowding into the
pool each day just to watch the athletes practice."

Russians Cut U.S. Margir
In Olympic Track Event

""'

SPORTS SHORTS:
Crimmins Quits as Indiana Mentor

By The Associated Press

I

4'

By The Associated Press,

in this one with Milt Campbell of~
MELBOURNE - The United Plainfield, N. J., and Bob Richards
States sends its three decathelon of LaVerne, Calif. Richards.
stalwarts and quarter-mile whiz
Lou Jones into the Melbourne Wednesday wasn't all Russia inn
Cricket Ground Arena Thursday track and field, but almost. The
to crack Russia's late gold medal U.S. swept the 110-meter hurdles
tcrackyinhussyia' agodmedal as Lee Calhoun upset Jack Davis I
rally in the Olympic Games. record time, and finished 1-2 in
The Soviet Union, which previ- the shot put with world record
ously had failed to live up to holder Parry O'Brien and young
stories of its new track and field Bill Nieder,
might, shot into the picture with Calhoun Wins
a second gold medal for Vladimir Cy
Kuts; a triumph in the women's Calhoun, of Gary, Ind., and
Kavelinsand atrmp 1-- gd slam Davis, the world record holder
in the 20-kilometer walk Wednes- from Glendale, Calif., both were
day timed in 13.5 seconds, clipping
Russian's Big Day two-tenths of a second off the re-
.Bcord, but Calhoun got the nod.
Coupled with a comeback vic- O'Brien, now an airman sta-
tory in the modern pentathlon tioned at Travis AFB, Calif., re-
after trailing the United States peated as the shot put champ by
through four of five events, these bettering his 1952 record with a
performances gave the Russians toss of 60 feet, 11 inches.
their biggest one-day medal har-
Vet of the aftes.,

BLOOMINGTON. Ind.-Bernie
Crimmins. conditioned to winning
as a player and assistant coach of
great Notre Dame football teams,
9resigned yesterday as Indiana
Unive sity coach aftersfive frus-
trating years.
Crimmins was given a new five-
year contract last year-over pro-
tests of the I.U. student news-
paper but he told school officials
yesterday he thought somebody
else ought to try to produce a win-
ner at Indiana, which hasn't had
one since the late Alvin "Bo"
McMillin's 1947 team.
Parseghian Honored
EVANSTON, Ill. - Ara Parseg-
hian, Northwestern football coach
was given a new five-year contract
at the annual football banquet
Tuesday night.
The action came as a vote of
confidence to the rookie coach,
who led the Wildcats to their fin-
est record since 1950. He origi-
nally had a two-year contract,
which was to terminate a year
from this December.
Moore Sued
CHICAGO-Archie Moore, con-
tender for the heavyweight boxing
U.

title, was sued for a total of $750.- Moore will fight Floyd Patter-
000 yesterday by a Shaker Heights, son for the boxing title tomorrow
0.. divorcee, night in Chicago Stadium.
Dollree Mapp. 28, accused Moore
of various malicouscsexual acts. Moore's headquarters reported
Her charges were contained in that the veteran fighter was not
three suits filed in U.S. District immediately available for com-
Court. ment.
r

,i

1
i'
1
j
1

BILL NIEDER
... Olympic second

The Soviets' spurt came at a
time when American Olympic of-
ficials were saying that the Rus-
sians apparently were "over 'the
hill."
The Americans still lead Russia
301-214 points in the unofficial
team race.
The Yanks figured to strengthen
their position by winning the 400-
meter race with Jones, of New
Rochelle, N. Y., and taking a
strong lead in the first half of the
exhausting decathlon, which con-
cludes Friday.
Decathlon Sweep?
Rafer Johnson, of Kingsburg,
Calif., has picked himself to win
the decathlon despite a knee in-
jury and he tries to take a lead
Thursday in the 100-meter dash,
shot put, high jump, broad jump
and 400-meter run.
America has a good chance to
score its fifth sweep of the games

Freshmen Numeral Awards

Robert H. Baer
David E. Brown
Robert L. Brown
Jared L. Bushong
Ermin W. Crownley
Tom DeMassa
Michael P. Dupay
Robert H. Dutnell
Michael E. Fillichlo
George W. Genyk
Duane J. Golvach
Wilfred J. Grein
Lee J. Griggs
Alvin V. Groce
Richard N. Hall
Darrell L. Harper
Andrew J. Hendrickson
Alfred J. Julian
Albert M. Karaba
Dale E. Keller
Nicholas Kik, III
Donald N. Kolcheff
Thomas J. Kuchka

Robert H. McCollum
James N. McPherson
Gary L. Mix
Michael D. Morrison
Bradley J. Myers
Murray L. Northup, Jr.
Stanton C. Noskin
Fred L. Olm
Lewis S. Ramsdell
Joseph K. Ritter
Gerald Smith
Charles G. Teuschner
William Tincoff
Rudd D. Van Dyne
James R. Vollmar
Floyd A. Wright

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GERMAN CLUB
Sponsors
Goethe's Faust (Part 1)
Drama (in German)
Presented by Deutsche Buehne, Detroit
December 4th, 7:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor High School Auditorium

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4TH
INTERVIEWING SENIORS
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
METALURGICAL ENGINEERING
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Reserved Seat Tickets Now on Sale at:
Beersma Travel " 3909 Taylor S. Quad.e Pretzel Bell
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They're smart, well made, and brim-
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Final Football Statistics

$2.00
TICKETS WILL

$1.50 $1.00
ALSO BE SOLD AT THE DOOR

MICH.+
FIRST DOWNS......... 160
Rushing............... 109
Passing .................46
Penalty ................ 5
NET YARDS RUSHING 1943
Number of attempts ... 471
Yards per attempt 4.13
NET YARDS PASSING 1032
Fwd. passes attempted 128
Fwd. passes completed 66
Passes had intercepted 8
% of passes completed 51.6
Yds. per pass attempted 8.06
Avg. Distance Per Punt 36.3
FUMBLES LOST......... 15
YARDS PENALIZED .... 420
INDIVIDUAL
RUSHING

OPP.
124
94
24
6
1629
433
3.76
579
100
39
9
39.0
5.79
35.2
23
310
t Avg.
75 3.9
66 6.1
08 4.6
98 4.8
90 3.3
19 3.8
77 3.5
72 3.0

i

23 is
Maddock, qb
42 20
Pace, hb
Barr, hb
12 4
6 5
PAS

5
0

65.2 2 245 3
47.6 3 213 0

IL - Chartered University Bus in front of Union 6:30 P.M. - I

I ;;

iu IPl n rrlr p11

11

i

S
5
.s

Herrnsteln, lb
G Att.
9 123
Barr, hb 9 60
Ptacek, hb
9 60
Pace, hb 9 103
Shannon, hb
9 27
9 5
Kramer, e
Byers, fb 9 22
Shatusky, hb
7 24
Maddock, qb
9 25
PA
Van Pelt, qb
Att. Comp.
33 15
Ptacek, hb

Gained Lost
494 19
393 27
235 27
552 54'
102 12
19 0
77 0
80 8

Ne
4
3
2C
49

Kramer, e
Maddock, qb
Ptacek, hb
Prahst, e
Pace, hb
Van Pelt, qb
Maentz, e
Brooks, e
Kramer, e
Maddock, qb
Maentz, e
Van Pelt, qb
Herrnstein, fb
Barr, ib
Kramer, e
Maddock, qb
Shannon, bb
Shatusky, hb
Van Pelt, qb
Pace, hb
Dickey, fb
Ptacek, hb
Prahst, e
Byers, fb
Maentz, e
TOTAL
OPPONENTS

6 50.0 1
83.3 0:
S RECEIVING
G No. Yds.
9 18 353
9 5 79
9 7 53
9 4 42
9 7 155
9 3 40
9 6 70
9 5 62
PUNTING
G No. Y
9 2 1
9 7 2
9 11 44
9 8 25
SCORING

Avg.
19.6
15.8
7.6
10.5
22.1
13.3
11.7
12.4

TD
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
0

ds.
12,
!22
140
56

a

G TD Att.
9 7 0
9 7 0
9 2 20
9 3 8
9 3 1
7 3 0
9 2 2
9 2 0
3 1 0
9 1 0
9 10
9 1 0
9 0 2
33 33
18 18

97 0
187 2

U

Stop everything-start laughing!

Pat. FG
0 0
0 0
17 2
7 0
1 0
0 0
2 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 0
29 2
12 1

Avg.
56.0
31.7
40.0
32.0
Ptsa
42
42
35
25
19
18
14
12
6
_6
6
6
2
233
123

98 26 72 2.9
.SSING
%Comp. .Int. Yds. TD
45.5 1 221 1

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These leisure-time champions are smart-

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