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November 28, 1956 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-28

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'WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGZ SAN

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflE IKYIW

r:a wwir yr wrr

I

US.

Retains

Com ma nding

Lead

in

Olympics

Several Freshmen Tabbed
As Key Grid Replacements

4

BY JIM BAAD
With the end of the football sea-
son and the departure of the most
experienced talent, the looks turn
towards, the freshman squad as
possible filler for the gaps of
graduation.
Freshman football coach Wally
Weber calls his 1956 squad "not
the best in our history but a reas-
onably strong and solid group." He
brings out however that "six or
seven of these players should make
valuable contributions, even as
early as next season."
Weber points first to the weak-
ened position of right halfback as
diplomas go to Terry Barr and Ed
Shannon. He names three names,
Rudd Van Dyne, Brad Myers, and
Fred Julian, which he labels a
"pool of fine potential."
Van Dyne, from Sedalla, Mo., is
an extremely fiery competitor with
Big Ten speed and is especially
tough on defense. Myers, an All
There will Ke a meeting of
the Football Officials tomorrow
at 4:30 p.m. to make AUl-Star
selections at the Sports Build-
ing.
--Shel Chambers
Field Supervisor
Stater from Evanston, Illinois, is
fast, a fine punter, and a good re-
verse runner, but still needs a little
polish on blocking.
Julian, hailing from Detroit's
Persing High School, reminds
Weber of Tony Branoff. He's not
quite as rugged a runner, but

shows more elusiveness than Bran-
off did.
A surprise package is end candi-
date Chuck Teuschner. He came
to Michigan to play basketball and
track, but Weber discovered his
football skill when Teuschner was
playing in his grid class in the
physical education school. He is
very fast, has a good pair of hands
and is rugged on defense.
Inside line candidates who have
shown promise with solid block-
ing and tackling are Mike Fillichio,
Fred Olm, and George Genyk.
Fillichio is a good fast-pulling
guard after the fashion of Dick
Hill. Genyk is not overly large at
190 pounds, but is very strong and
practically tireless. Weber feels
that he will be a top competitor
for the graduating Hill's position.
Olm is a giant at 230 pounds and
he handles himself very well for
his size. Weber says that both he
and Genyk are especially adept at
defense.
At quarterback, Weber feels he
has a possible strong contributor
in Stan Noskin from Evanston,
Illinois. At tailback a name to
watch for is Darrell Harper.
Freshman football practice has
shown that the above players ap-
pear to have better than average
football ability, but as Weber says,
"Not a one of them has made a
block or a tackle in a Big Ten
football game."
"The spring scrimmage when
the freshmen get out against the
more experienced boys will show
a lot more," he said.

P.ROUD AS PEACOCKS-Four of 16 U.S. Olympic gold medal winners shown displaying their
medals at Olympic Village near Melbourne are: (1. to r.) Glenn Davis, winner of the 400 meter
hurdles; Greg Bell, broad jump winner; Charlie Dumas, winner of the high jump, and Harold Con-
nolly, hammer throw winner.
Morrow Captures Second Gold Medal;
Americans Break Four World Records

GEORGE ARMELAGOS
J
By DALE CANTOR
If you ever stopped off to watch
football practice,. you probably
noticed that 10 or 15 of the players
were wearing red shirts over their
uniforms.
You probably wondered who they
were because you never saw them,
in the Stadium. Well, you never
did see them in the Stadium be-
cause their work takes place in
the confines of Ferry Field.
Have Many Names
Unsurprisingly enough, they're
known as the 'red-shirts." Per-
haps a more common name, al-
though a bit more crude and gen-
erally uncomplimentary, is
scrubs," or they are dubbed "re-
serves," a slightly more dignified
title. GEORGE ARMELAGOS
However, don't underestimate ... banquet at Crazy Jim's
the importance of this group of Coln Park, Mich., was a center on
football players. Sure, they're the his high school team. Now, he's
boys who didn't quite "make the a center or he plays "anywhere
big team yet," but they're also the they want me," he adds.
ones who do a good part of theoot I or
roug wok ivoled n pepaing Armelagos wrestled as a fresh-
for the game on Saturday. man, but gave it up after his first
They are the boys who run the year. Now a 'junior in The Liter-
opponent's plays against the var- ary College, he is majoring in An-
sity and they receive the knocks thropology and is looking forward
and jolts when the varsity begins to being a dentist.
to fell their oats. Rough Job? You Armelagos evidently doesn't let
bet! his football career interfere with
Two Years at Helm his schoolwork because "My grades
The "red-shirts" are a very well are better during football season
organized group of men. Don Du- than at any other time. Football
fek is their coach and a cheerful must have a good influence on
little guy by the name of George me," he says.
Armelagos is their captain. Likes Football
Armelagos has been captain of George Armelagos will receive a
the red-shirts for the past two reserve award for being a red-
years and has a fine chance of be- shirt this season and he and the
ing re-elected to the position next rest of the reserves will have their
year. football banquet-at Crazy Jim's.
You've got to give a guy a lot Is this his reward for all those
of credit when he goes out to the knocks and jolts? Why does he do
football field every day to "en- it, you ask?
gage" in a little exercise with the He answers, "I have a good time
varsity. out there and I guess I just like
The 5'10" 205-lb. native of Lin- football."
TONIGHT
A PANEL DISCUSSION:
DISCRIMINATION IN ANN ARBOR
0 Donald Pelz of Ann Arbor Self-Survey
* Representative of NAACP
BOB MARSHALL
0 Representative of Human Relations Board-SGC

Quarterback
Films Attract
Large Crowd
The last quarterback films of
the season were shown Monday
night to a record audience of over
1,000 viewers.
The films of last Saturday's
game against OSU attracted a
crowd large enough to fill the
Union Ballroom where the films
were shown.
Former Michigan fullback and
team captain Dick Blazhiser and
Tad Stanford, former Wolverine
end and golfer, narrated the films
during the season.

By AL WINKELSTEIN
The United States team, captur-
ing 16 gold medals in the Olym-
pic Games at Melbourne have
forged into a commanding lead in
the unofficial point scoring for
team honors.
American athletes have amassed

INTRAMURAL VICTORS:

Sigma Chi Takes 'B' Championship;
Gomberg Smashes Four Swim Marks

Yesterday at snow covered Ferry
Field, Sigma Chi downed Pi
Lambda Phi 14-6 to annex the
social fraternity "B" football
championship.
After kicking off to the Pi
Lams, Sigma Chi's Wimpy Trum-
bull intercepted Jack Roth's pass
at midfield and Sigma Chi took
over. "Bub" Young, Sigma Chi
tailback, then ran to the Pi Lam
15 yd. line and two plays later
he passed to John Wylie for the
touchdown. Young ran for the
extra point.
Young To Victor Clicks
Starting off the second half,
Pi Lam kicked off to Sig Chi and
Young ran the kick back to mid-
field. On the next play from scrim-
mage, Young hit Jerry Victor for
another score. Young also passed
to Payson Chapman for the extra
point.

Following the kickoff a Pi Lam
drive stalled and Sigma Chi took
over. However Leon Greenblatt
picked off a Young pass and sped
to the 20 yd. line. Three plays later
Roth passed to Bernie Goodman
for the only Pi Lam score.
Tout New Marks
Gomberg broke four I-M swim-
ming records Monday night as it
splashed to a 40-17 win over Van-
Tyne in a dual meet.
The new marks were set in the
100-yd.free style relay, the medley
relay, the individual 25-yd. free
style and the 25-yd. breaststroke.
The free style relay team broke
the old mark of :47.2 by covering
the 100-yd. distance in :46.8, while
the medley team shaved that rec-
ord from :41.2 to :40.4.

Gomberg's Bill Wheat swam the
25-yd. free style in :11.5, eclipsing
the old mark of :11.9.
Dave Karr set the forth record,
a :13.9 mark in the 25-yd. breast-
stroke. The old record was :14.5.
OTHER SCORES
VOLLEYBALL
Allen Rumsey 4, Greene 2
Phi Gamma Delta 4, Phi Sigma Delta
0
Winchell over Hinsdale (forfeit)
Anderson over Hayden (forfeit)
Cooley 6, Lloyd 0
Wenley 3, Van Tyne 3
Zoology Grads 5. English A 1
Strauss 5, Huber 1
Gomberg 6, Michigan 0
Economics 6, Psych C 0
Museum 6, Bio Chem 0
Air Science 4, Psych A 2
Scott 6, Adams 0
Williams 5, Kelsey I
Delta Tau Delta 5, Psi Upsilon 1

262 points in competition through
yesterday, while the Russian con-
tingent, rated as the favorite for
team honors has only 152. In yes-
terday events, the U.S. added five
more gold medals.
Many New Records
As was expected, the Games have
produced a flourish of new rec-
ords. So far, five world records
and 15 Olympic marks have been
smashed. Nine of these marks are
in track and field competition.
Four of the five were set by
Americans in weight lifting events
which the U.S. also dominated.
The final record was set in the
women's discus throw.
Morrow Dobie Winner
Bobby Morrow, America's star
sprinter became the first double
medal winner in the Games. Yes-
terday, he won the 200 meter dash,
and broke one of the oldest Olym-
pic marks set by Jessie Owens in
1936. His time was 20.6 seconds,
one tenth faster than Owens' time.
Previously Morrow had won a gold
medal in the 100 meter dash, but
because of a strong headwind,
could not approach the Olympic
mark.
Another record, and a clean
sweap for the U.S. came in the
discus, wonby Al Carter with a
throw of 184'10%" yesterday. This
broke the old mark, set in 1952 by
better than four feet. Fortune Gor-
dien and Desmond Koch, also of
the U.S. placed second and third
respectively.
Beaten in the first heat last Fri-

day by Australia and Canada, the
Yale rowing team came back to
nose out Canada and the Aussies
in the final, and give the U.S. team
its third gold medal of the rowing
competition.
Courtney Takes 800
The 800 meter run produced a
new record, when Tom Courtney,
former Fordham great, ran the dis-
tance in 1:47.7.
Charley Dumas, the only high
jumper to clear seven feet, and
Bob Richards, who consistently
pole vaults 15 feet, both fell just
short of their respective goals, but
still set new Olympic marks. Du-
mas missed the coveted seven foot
mark by %", while Richards was
only %" under the 15' height.
Another record set by an Am-
erican went to Hal Connolly in the
discus throw. The other American
winner in track and field, Greg
Bell failed to break the mark in
the broad jump.
Summaries
Medals
Team Gold Points
1 United States 16 262
2 Russia 6 150
3 Germany 2 52%/
4 Sweden 3 42
5 Italy 2 40
6 Britain 1 33_
7 Australia 1 33
8 Poland 1 21
9 Iran 0 15
10 Norway 1 14
11 France 1 13
Hungary 0 13
13 Korea 0 11
Czechoslovakia 1 11
15 New Zealand 1 10
Argentina 0 10

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