100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 28, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1956 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TH1~EK

U.S. Students May Attend
Oslo 'U' Summer Session

MECCA OF SCHOLARS:
'U' Has Largest Papyrus Collection

PASS THE CREAM:
Coffee to SparkStudies

The University of Oslo has an-
nlounced its 11th summer session
to be held from July 6 to Aug. 16,
1957, in Oslo, Norway. All classes
will be conducted In English.
The courses offered will include
The H-umanities and Social Stud-
les, A General Survey of Norwe-
gian Culture, The Education Sys-
tern in Norway and graduate
courses in Norwegian Education,
Literature and Society.
A featured course will be "The
* Industries of Norway" for business
men and advanced students of In-
ternational Trade. This will in-
volve three weeks in Oslo and

three weeks

travel in Norway

visiting typical industrial plants.
Housing is provided for both
single and married students.
Six credit hours may be earned
in the six weeks course. The
session Is approved by the U.S.
Veterans Administration for vet-
erans under P.L. 346 and P.L.
550. Applicants should have com-
pleted their freshman year not
later than June, 1957.
For any further information,
interested persons write to Oslo
Summer School Admissions Office,
in care of St. Olaf College, North-
field, Minnesota.

By RONALD SCHELKOPF
The largest collection of Egyp-
tian papyri in the United States
makes the University a paragon
of ancient language evidences and
the Mecca of classical scholars,
according to Herbert C. Youtie,
research professor of papyrology.
Papyrus is a form of paper made
from the pith of'the papyrus plant
which once grew plentifully in the
shallow water of the Nile Delta.
It was used by the Greeks -to re-.
cord Biblical and apocryphal writ-
ings.
Francis W. Kelsey, one-time
professor of the Latin language

and literature, remains in the
memory of the University as his
name is carried by the Kelsey
Archaeological Museum.
He is even better known as the
first person to bring papyri to
this country, Prof. Youtle said.
His impetus now accounts for
some 10,00%l complete and frag-
mentary pieces of papyri-Ameri-
ca's largest, according to Prof.
Youtie.
Four "show pieces" make up the
bulk of the University's most val-
ued papyri.
The Epistiles of Paul, the Shep-
herd of Hermas, the Book of

U-

TOOROFRIDAY & ATURDAY AT 8 P.M.
THE ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE Presents
NANCY HESLAL DULS
in
,I
~.
i5oancan
II
- The Broadway Sensation by ROBERT ANDERSON
.RAY RALPH PAUL BETTY ANN HERB
with BA HOR BRISTOL DAY GOULD AKL INE
Staged by TED HEUSEL Setting by ROBERT MAITLAND
All seats $1 .50 - Box office open daily frorm 10 A.M. - Call NO 8-6300 for reservations
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Enoch and the Homily of Milito
form the nucleus of the "largest
and most significant collection in
this country," the professor said.
The University's collection can-
not compare with collections in
Europe, however, the professor
explained. The Vienna collection
and the British Museum papyri
are more numerous and more val-
uable, he added.
Since those countries are closer
to the source of Biblical and apo-
cryphal evidences, it Is no wonder
that they are foremost in world
collection, Prof. Youtie pointed
out.
Thirty leaves (pages) of St.
Paul's letters to seven churches
are owned by the University. This
collection plus the 55 leaves of the
Beatty and housed by the British
Museum comprise what Prof.
Campbell Bonner, former head of
the department of Greek, has de-
scribed as "the most extensive
early text of the New Testament."
What is thought to be the com-
plete fragments of the "Shepherd
of Hermas" is in the University's
possession. Its importance as an
apocryphal work lies in its -Greek
text which was written centuries
before other works. .
It was thought that the work
was very popular in the ancient
church, but when the canon of
the Gospel was selected, it was not
Included.
"Enoch" is another apocryphal
work once popular but not Includ-
ed in the Bible. Prof. Youtle de-
scribed it as a work In which a
guide takes the writer on a great
journey into celestial regions
tewrat of God on the unfith
T he "Homily of Melito" is a ser-
mon by Bishop Melito of Sardis
written in the second century A.D.
It deals with the passions of Christ
and is probably an Easter ser-
mon, Professor Youtie said.
Both the "Enoch" and the "Me-
lito" are divided between the Uni-
versity and the British Museum
collections.
The University has gained all
its valuable papyri through pur-
chase rather than excavation, the
professor explained. "The old
ruins decompose and these 'dump
heaps' are used for fertilizer. The
The first regional Teen-Age
Safe Driving Conference, sched-
uled to run through yesterday and
today, has been cancelled, accord-
ing to Prof. Karl F. Ziesler of the
journalism dept-
The conference, to include high
school students from Washtenaw,
Jackson, Monroe and Lenawee
Counties, was called off due to
lack of interest.
Zeisler said that invitations had
been sent to all high schools in
the conference district, but only
five acceptances were received by
the sponsors.
The University was to host the
conference with the Governor 's
Teen-Age Driving Committee,
Michigan Youth Commission and
Commission of Safety Education
n Cl efcense aass esnsors.Te
held at Rackham.
"We are disappointed that
schools didn't respond," Zeisfer
said. He indicated, however, that
there are hopes of re-scheduling
the conference for a future date.

Egyptians are more likely to find
these manuscripts," Prof. Youtie
said.
The Egyptians are supposed to
give their finds to the govern-
ment, but they usually sell them
to, dealers, who in turn sell them
to foreign collectors, the papyrolo-
gist explained.
Egypt's climate and its iscant
rainfall provide the answer for the
frequency of discoveries in that
country, Dr Elinor M. Husselman,
curator of Kelsey Museum, re-
la1ted-
Since the climate is dry, the
papyri do not decompose rapidly
and are more likely to be pre-
served, she continued.
Dr. Husselman explained the
existence of Greek manuscripts In
Egypt with the theory that they
were probably written by Greeks
in this region where Greek was the
official language from the Greco-
Roman era until the Arab con-
quest in the seventh century.
Scholars date papyri finds by
examining the style of writing
used by their authors. Prior to the
~ninth century A.D., the manu-
scripts were written in large capi-
tal-like letters called unicals.
Later, the Greeks bagin using
a smaller, cursive script type of
lettering called minuscules.
The papyri are prized for both
their historical and biblical value
Prof. Youtie said.
The University provides a vast
repository for documents used in
biblical, theological and classical
studies unparalled In the United
States.
Bingham Dai
To Gie al
Dr. Bingham Dai who teaches
psychiatry at Duke University,
will speak on "Science and Wis-
dom - a Comparative Study of
the Teachings of Some Great
Religions and the Findings of
Psychiatry" at 4:15 p.m. Friday in
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Born and educated in China, Dr.
Dai received his PhD in sociology
at the University of Chicago. He
attended the Chicago Psychoana-
lytic Institute for his training in
psychiatry. Then returned to Chi-
na to practice.
During the war, he worked in
the Office of Strategic Services to
educate American personnel in
Far Eastern culture.
One of his major interests has
been comparison of the religious
teachings of Confucianism, Chris-
tianity, and Buddhism and mod-
ern psychiatry.
The lecture is sponsored by the
Department of Psychiatry and the
Committee on Studies in Religion.

If all goes well it will soon be
possible to sip coffee during class.-
Plans are underway to hold
classes in one of the meeting
rooms of the Union instead of a
class room. Coffee would be served
to give an air of Informality.
"The purpose of this project is
for class members and the in-
structor to get to know each oth-
er better," Fred Trost, executive
vice-president of the Union, com-
mented.-
The plan will be presented to
the Union's Board of Directors at
their December. meetIng.
If approved, it will start at the
beginning of the second semes-
ter. A sign-up sheet would be cir-

culated among instructors and
those signing would be contacted
by the business office of the Union
concerning arrangement as to
time, date and room.
Trost said that indications
pointed to wide acceptance of the
idea once in operation.
Plans for the coffee classes have
been slowed by the Illness of Rog-
er Dalton, former chairman of the
Campus Relations Committee of
the Union. Dalton was one of the
early workers on the project.
Previously, several departments
had participated in a similar plan.
Under this procedure, faculty and
students of a department met for
an informal coffee hour.

COA~~

That's where the pause that
refreshes with ice-cold Coke began.
Now it's enjoyed fifty million times a dy
Must be something to it. And there is, Have an
ice-cold Coca-Cola and see... right now.
SOITLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY ST
ANN ARDOR COCA COLA BOTTLING CO.

"3Cok*" is a registered trade-mark.

@1956, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

1

MICHIGNENSIA to feaur
33 rpm RECOD..

S

Mae zDcs wtWO twf

cdwaysgood company!

G# Cotan excerpts from i-op,
announcing, Speech by Harlan
Hatcher, Bells of Burton Tower

and many other sounds which
are MICHIGAN.
SSells for 75c only to those who
have purchased a 1957 'Ensian

:: .'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan