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November 21, 1956 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-21

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PAIGE ETGTTT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. AQVE7NTSE7t?1, 19,51

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN UAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER ~1? Th5ff

,REPORT PROGRESS:
Committee Work Keeps SGC Rolling

I. -

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 1)
nations and is responsible for plan-
ning the calendar of organization-
al activities on campus.
National and International Stu-
dents Committee concerns itself
with three areas of University life
,it channels information from
the National Students Association
to the University, selects delegates
for the Association's annual con-
ference and manages all corres-
pondence between the University
and other schools.
It is also responsible for main-
taining the University's place in
the Collegiate Council for the
United Nations, handling the ex-
change students program with the
Free University of Berlin, and
conducting seminars on interna-
tional student relations.
It is presently considering a pro-
gram to sponsor a Hungarian stu-
dent at the University.
Educational and Social Welfare
To improve education through
recommendations, studies and pro-
posals is the chief function of the
Education and Social Welfare
committee, chairman Tom Sawyer,
'58, said.
The committee works through
various sub - committees which
handle matters concerning student
jobs, scholarships and discrimin-
ation in education.
One of the sub-committees is
presently drawing up a program

planning sheet which will enable
a student in the literary college
to set up his curriculum one to
two years in advance. Another'
committee is investigating meth-
ods to aid a student in choosing
his curriculum, while a third group
is looking into the possibility of
allowing juniors and seniors to
sign their own election cards.
A fourth committee, the Uni-
versity Lecture Committee, is com-
posed of four council members who
plan to make proposals to the Re-
gents and the University on the
problem of he Regents bylaw con-
cerning outside speakers.
A fifth sub-committee is atudy-
ing the present orientation pro-
gram.
Possibility of initiating a stu-
dent leadership training programI
to acquaint students with various
campus activities is now under the
education committee's consider-
ation. The program will involve
cooperative action between the
Union and the League.
Student Representation
Interviewing students for SGC's
14 campus committees and board
acting as liaison between SGC and
the committees are the duties of
the Student Representation Com-
mittee, headed by Don Good, '57E.
The committee annually selects
students to fill vacancies on these
campus committees. This fall, the
group will select candidates for

the Cinema Guild and Human Re-
lations Boards.
Lew Engman, chairman of the
Campus Affairs Committee said it
handles all short term projects
not handled by other committees.
One of the committee's major
projects is studying bicycle con-
gestion in the State Street and
North Universiy area. Two sugges-
tions now under consideration are
to erect bicycle racks in place of
several auto parking spaces and
to erect additional racks on Uni-
.versity property.
The committee is also studying
the residence halls finance plan,
comparing the University's self-
liquidating plan to systems in use
at other universities. It is also
studying suggestions to meet the
expected increase in University
enrollment.
Working with the Board in Con-
trol of Student Athletics, the com-
mittee is investigating the sale and
transfer of student football tickets.
In conjunction with the Survey
Research Center, the committee is
considering the establishment of
a student opinion center to provide
accurate surveys of campus atti-
tudes.
Other projecs include evaluation
of the 'M' Handbook and Block
'M'. The committee is also in-
vestigating the possibility' of in-
itiating guided tours of the cam-
pus.

5r 1
(Continued from Page 4)
and a Bulletin of Information may be
obtained from Room 122, Rackham
Bldg., or directly from the National
Teacher Examinations, Educational
Testing Service, 20 Nassau St., Prince-
ton, N. J. Applications must be re-
ceived at the Princeton office not la-
ter than Jan. 11, 1957.
The Lucy Elliott Fellowship with a
stipend of $400.00 is being offered by
the Alumnae Council of the Alumni As-
sociation of the University of Michi-
gan for the second semester of the
academic year 1956-57, open to gradu-
ate students from any college or uni-
versity. Personality, achievement, schol-
astic ability are criteria for selection
with preference shown to those doing
creative work.
Application for the fellowship may
be made through the Alumnae Coun-
cil Office, Michigan League and must
be filed by Dec. 1, 1956.
Mary L. Hinsdale Scholarship,
amounting to $138.19 (interest on the
endowment fund) is available to un-
dergraduate women who are wholly or
partially self-supporting and who do
not live in University residence halls
or sorority houses. Girls with better
than average scholarship and need will
be considered. Application blanks, ob-
tainable at the Alumnae Council Of-
fice, Michigan League, should be filed
by Dec. 1, 1956.
Audio-Visual Noon Showing, 12:30
p.m,. Room 4051, Administration Bldg.
Nov. 21. "Admiral Dewey's Victory at
Manilla."

Events Today
Research Club: November meeting
Wed, Nov. 21 at 8*00 p m, in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The following pa-
pers will be presented: Ralph A. Saw-
yer (Physics): "The University's Pro-
gram in Atomic Energy" and Robert
S. Niess (Romance Languages): "Zola
and Cezanne".
Coming Events
Phi Delta Kappa. Special meeting of
Omega Chapter, Phi Delta Kappa, Mon.,
Nov. 26 at 8:00 p.m., West Conference
Room, Rackham Bldg. Dr. Maynard Be-
mis, new Executive Secretary, will
speak. Refreshments.
Placement Notices
The following school will be at the
Bureau of Appointments, on Nov. 28
to interview for teachers for Feb., 1957.
Mt. Clemens, Michigan (L'anse Creuse
Schools) - elementary, (Kindergarten,
2nd grade, 5th grade); Special Educa-
tion (any).
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointment, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489.
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from following will
be at Engrg. School:
Tues., Nov. 27
Allen B. DuMont Labs.. Inc., East
Paterson,BN. J. - all levels in Elect.,
Ind., Instru., Math.. Mech., Engrg.
Mech., Nuclear, Physics, and Science
for Research, Devel., Design and Pro-
duction.
Hycon Eastern, Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
-all levels in Elect., Instru., and Phy-
sics for Summer & Regular Research,
Devel., and Design. U.S. citizen.
Indiana & Michigan Electric Co., Pt
Wayne, Indiana - B.S. or M.S. in
Civil, Elect., Ind., Mat'ls, Math., Mech.,
Engrg. Mech., Physics, and Science for
Power Plants, Systems Transmission &
Distribution, System Operations, Dis-
tribution, Engrg., Meter, and Sub-
station, Sales and Acctg. U.S. citizen.

The Institute of Paper Chemistry,
Appleton, Wis. - all levels in Che. E.,
Civil, Math., Mech., Engrg. Mech., Phy-
sics and Science; B.S. In Elect, for Re-
search, and Teaching at the graduate
level along with Research for PhD men.j
Revere Copper and Brass, Inc., De-
troit, Mich. - B.S. in Ch. E., Elect.,
Mech., and Metal. for Production, Sales,
Methods, and Plant Engrg.
Wayne County Road Commission, De-
troit, Mich. - all levels in Civil and
Constr., for Bridge Design and Con-
struction. U.S. citizens.
Wed., Nov. 28
The M. WV. Kellogg Co., New York,
N.Y. - all levels in Che. E., Civil, and
Mech.; M. S. or PhD in Math.: M.S.
in Elect. for Research, Pilot Plant Stu-
dies, Process Development, Process
Engrg., Design Engrg., and Chem. Mfg.
Minnesota Mining and Manufactur-
ing Co., St. Paul, Minn. - all levels
in Ch. E.; B.S. or M.S. in Elect., Ind.,
Instr., Mech., and Physics for Summer
and Regular Research, Development,
Design, Production, and Sales.
Wed. & Thurs., Nov. 28 & 29
ProcterB & Gamble Co.. Cincinnati
Ohio - B.S. & M.S. in Ch. E., Mech.
Ind., Civil, Elect., Engrg. Mech., Math.,
Physics and Chem. for Research, Devel.,
Design, Prod., and Factory Manage-
ment.
The Dow Chem. Co., Midland, Mich.
-all levels in Aero., Ch. E., Civil, Elect.,
Ind., Instr., Mat'ls, Math., Mech.,
Metal., Nuclear, Physics, and Science
for Summer and Regular Research.
Devel., Design, Production. Sales, Chem-
ical Analysis, Technical Service, Prod-
uct Development, Purchasing, etc.
Thurs., Nov. 29
National Lead Co., Titanium Div.,
South Amboy, New Jersey - all levels
in Chem. E., Metal., Physics, and Sci-
ence for Summer and Regular Re-
search and Development.
Bakelite Co., Div. of Union Carbide
and Carbon Corp., Bound Brook, N. J.j
-B.S. or M.S. in Ch. E., Elect., Mech.,
Ind., Chem. and Physics for Research,
Devel., Design, Production, and Sales,
For appointments contact the Engrg.
Placement Office, 347 W. Engrg., ext.
2182. -

MICHIGAN UNION

MAIN DINING ROOM
Fresh Gulf Shrimp Cocktail
Chilled Apple Juice
Old Fashioned Oyster Soup

12:30-3:00
Marinated Herring
Broiled Half Grapefruit
Consomme Celestine

I

BROILED AUSTRALIAN LOBSTER TAIL with DRAWN BUTTER
BAKED SUGAR CURED HAM with CIDER SAUCE
ROAST TOM TURKEY, CHESTNUT DRESSING,
CRANBERRY SAUCE
ROAST ALMA DUCKLING, NUT DRESSING, APPLE SAUCE
BROILED NOISETTE of LAMB, CHERRON
ROAST PRIME RIB of BEEF AU JUS
TENDERLOIN STEAK SAUTE, MINUTE, with MUSHROOMS
BROILED NEW YORK SIRLOIN STEAK, MAITRE D'HOTEL

French Fried Potatoes . CCandi
Cream Whipped Potatoes

ed Sweet Potatoes
uttered Green Peas

Broccoli, Hollandaise

Bu

Mashed Butternut Squash
Molded Cranberry Salad Iceberg Lettuce, Roquefort Dressing
Assorted Relishes

Hot Rolls

Rye Krisp

Hot Mince Pie with Rum Sauce Pumpkin Pie with Whipped Cream
Raspberry Parfait Southern Holiday Cake
Liederkranz Cheese, Toasted Crackers Chocolate Mint Sundae
Lemon Sherbet or Kringle Krunch Ice Cream
Beverage

11

I
"Imm"PA

Restaurants

Yo u

Will Enjoy

Thanksgiving

Weekend

We recommend that you try any of these fine

i

restaurants for

a wonderful meal.

Consult the Daily for GOOD EATING!

Old German Restaurant
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST, FINEST IN MUSIC AND
FINEST IN FOOD
TAKE OUT DINNERS
Select from our entire Menu
Open from 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
With meals served until 8 P.M. - Closed Thursdays
Phone NO 2-0737

FAMILY STYLE DINNERS

For Light Lunches
Fine Sandwiches or Cream Waffles
At their best
Stop at

Chicken

27h

may ower

(4
ti1
(t))Jj>j
? tJ 1t
%< -4

COFFEE SHOPPE
CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY
OPEN FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Cleanliness, Quality, and Service Always
Corner 4th and Liberty
7. A.M.-Midnight . . . Closed Sundays

S teaks

I

ENJOY THANKSGIVING DINNER AT
/1eit**q
CHUCK WAGON
SERVING BUFFET STYLE
ROAST STUFFED TOM TURKEY
and
OUR PRIME WESTERN BEEF
with
ASSORTED RELISHES, SALADS,
HOME MADE PIES AND
APPLE CIDER FROM THE BARREL
OPEN THANKSGIVING DAY
12 NOON TO 9 P.M.

Seafood

{

Chops

HOMESTYLE COOKING
will complete your football
weekend
FARM CUPBOARD
5400 PLYMOUTH RD. - DIXBORO, MICH.

4

~1

N. Main right on U.S. 12

Phone NO 8-9387

/

Saturday and

Sunday open 11 A.M. -
Closed Monday

10 P.M.

2045 PACKARD
Catering at Your Home or Hall

NO 2-1661
Henry Turner, Prop.

I a rn nr i

I'

j.ai
N

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT

1amtn'ut

90,P

Sine 90d4

ti Q
c r
of

takes- pleasure in announcing
an addition to their menu
of fine foods

SMORGASBORD
40i

TOWER

A

re

THAYER STREET

"IV

U

l

I

300 S.

OTEL

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

I

WE WILL BE
OPEN THANKSGIVING
will be served daily from
4 PM. to 2 A.M. in our new dining room
"TH E DUCHESS mRM"d
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and baked in new i

THE ART OF ENJOYING SMORGASBORD
Tonight YOU are the artist - for the SMORGASBORD is a
grand adventure and is considered a *classic* culinary art.
Help yowself first to the many kinds of fish, herrings and
seafood. Then return for the salads, meats and cheese. Finally
.eIect from our tasty het delicacies.
'SMORGASBORD- can be traced back to the old Viking
feast days, when distances were long; but at the end of all jou-
says one could fiandromance and gaiety at the "SMORGASBORD,-
the lonely man besieged with troubles and sorrow could.find
solace at the "SMORGASBORD," a young maiden in search of
love and happiness could find them at the gay "SMORGASBORD.?
And so it is with our "SMORGASBORD,- which is symbolic
of the Scandinavian seat for good living. From their farms we

1,

I]

11

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