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November 21, 1956 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-21

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PAGE SIB!

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I EDNESDA"Y', NOVEMBER 21, 1956

4

PAGE SIX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 21. 1~56

Freshman

Cagers

Bow

to

Varsit

Squad,

80-67

i

ATTRACT 68 COUNTRIES:
Olympic Games To Start Tomorrow

By AL WINKELSTEIN
Athletes from 68 countries will
start competition in the 16th mod-
ern Olympic Games at Melbourne
tomorrow with opening ceremo-
nies.
Originally, 74 countries were
scheduled to send teams, but be-
cause of the recent international
incidents in the Middle East and
Hungary, six countries have with-
drawn in protest.
Although there is no official
"winning" country in the Olym-
pics, the greatest interest will pro-

bably center around the race for
the unofficial "team crown" be-
tween the United States and Rus-
sia. This was the case in the 1952
Olympics at Helsinki, in which the
unofficial totals gave the U.S.
team the title.
Three current Michigan ath-
letes will represent three different
countries in the Olympics. The
only one from the U.S., Dick Han-
ley, star of last year's Wolverine
freshman swimming squad, is
rated the best chance of the three
to take a gold medal.

I

Finland's Eeles Landstrom is
rated as the best foreign entry
in the pole vault, and figures to
place high in this event. Ed Gag-
nier, Canada's one-man gymnas-
tic squad, rounds out the list of
Wolverine athletes in Melbourne.
Competition figures to bed
stronger than in any one of the
previous games. The United States
has one of the strongest teams
ever assembled, but are going to
be hard pressed in every sport.
The Russian group is the larg-
est, and probably the best trained
group.
America figures to dominate
most of the men's track and field
events except for the long dis-
tance races, which almost always
go to the European nations.
Australia a Challenge
Swimming competition figures
to be a two-country race between
the United States and Australia
in the men's division, and almost
exclusively Australia in the wo-
men's events. In basketball, the
general consensus of opinion is
that the U.S. is far ahead of any-
one else.
The United States has a good1
chance to pick up a few gold med-
als in several of the so-called mi-
nor sports, but Russia should be 1
able to score very heavily in these, t
especially in sports like shooting,1
gymnastics, and wrestling. 7

GAGNIER AND HANLEY-Gymnast Ed Gagnier for Canada
(left) and swimmer Dick Hanley for the United States are two
of Michigan's three Olympic hopefuls. Pole-vaultet Eeles Land-
strom will be representing Finland in the Games.
Gombeirg'13' Captuffres

Residence Halls Title
Gomberg edged Reeves to copR
the I-M residence hall "B" title Reeves pass. A few ph
last night in a tight 7-6 battle Pat Donahue, who turned
before an enthusiastic Wines Field game for the winners,1
crowd. touchdown pass to Tom
The Reeves fans had something Donahue scampered acro
to cheer about when their team conversion to make it G
drew first blood early in the game Reeves 6.
on a beautifully executed long j Adams House grabbe
pass play which went from Mike place honors by defeats
Benedict to Paul Babas. chell 1-0, in a closely
Slippery field conditions made contest. It was the sect
ball handling difficult and neither time, decision Adams he
team was able to make much in as many weeks-
headway. Gomberg capitalized on Cooley and Van Tyne N
Tom Stapleton's interception of a and fourth place finals.

ays later,
in a fine
pitched a
Harden.
ss for the
omberg 7:
d second
ing Win-
-matched
)nd over-
as earned
won third

Burton Gains
Early Praise
At Forward
By JIM BAAD
Sophomore M. C. Burton and
junior Pete Tillotson led Michi-
gan's Varsityrbasketball team to
a 80-67 victory over the Fresh-
men in their annual open-to-the-
public scrimmage at Yost Field
House last night.
What started out to be a Var-
sity runaway in the first half
tightened up into a rather excit-
ing contest in the second stanza
due to a surge of Freshman scor-
ing.
Coach Bill Perrigo employed his
first string to build up a 44-19
lead. He then put in his second
stringers after the intermission
with rather disastrous results. In
six minutes the Freshmen had
outscored them by 17-3. The
starters returned, and after a few
anxious minutes, finally wrapped
up the contest.
Burton Rebounds Well
Perigo called Burton, who scored
well, the steadiest player he had
19 points and rebounded very
well, the steadiest player he had
on the floor. Tillotson, hitting
well from all around the basket,
collected 20 points for the night's
high total.
George Lee, a forward-con-
verted-to-guard, had a bad eve-
ning at his new position as he was
having trouble finding the range.
Perigo also heaved a sigh over his
second string, which did not show
up particularly well at all.
The Freshmen's two outstand-
ing players were 6'8" center Bob
Bolton andguard Terry Miller.
Bolton displayed a nice hook in
collecting 15 points. Miller had
13 points.
Action Soon
For Teams
Michigan's 1956-57 gymnastics
squad will go on show for the
public for the first time this year
next Monday, Nov. 26, at 8 p.m. in
the I-M Sports Building.
Wolverine coach Newt Loken
states that this is a warm-up mneet
for the gymnasts as the team will
compete in an intra-squad match.
The gymnasts will face their
first challengers at the Midwest
Open in Chicago, Ill., on Satur-
day, Dec. 1.
The Wolverine Hockey team will
open here on Dec. 8 against Tor-
onto in the first contest of the
1956-57 schedule.
Coach Bill Perigo's basketball
squad begins its season on the
home court against Delaware, Dec.
1. All hockey and basketball
games begin this year at 8 p.m.

GRID SELECTIONS
Well, football fans, this is the last time the Daily Sports Staff
will be going out on a limb by predicting the outcome of 20 games
across the country.
With Thanksgiving vacation starting today, this final Grid Picks
contest has an early deadline. All entries must be postmarked before
noon today or received at the Daily by that time.
The address is Student Publications Building, 42Q Maynard St.,
Ann Arbor.
The winner will receive two free tickets to either "You Can't
Run Away From It," to be featured at the State Theater or "Silent
World" which will be playing at the Michigan.
Be sure to pick the score of the Michigan-Ohio State game as
this will be the deciding factor in case of multiple ties.
This week's guest will be Arthur Brandon, Director of University
Relations.
Game number 14 is Penn. St. at Pittsburgh and not at Pennsyl-
vania as reported in yesterday's Daily.
SELECTIONS
(Consensus selections appear in capitals.)
CONSENSUS (107-53-.669)

1. MICHIGAN at Ohio State
2 ARKANSAS vs. Louisiana St.
3. BAYLOR at Southern Meth.
4. DUKE at North Carolina
5. ILLINOIS at Northwestern
6. Indiana at PURDUE
7. Kansas St. at MICH. STATE
8. Kentucky at TENNESSEE
9. M'1ARYLAND at N. Car. St.
10. MINNESOTA at Wisconsin

4
I

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Nebraska at OKLAHOMA
Notre Dame at IOWA
Oregon at OREGON STATE
Penn State at PITTSBURGH
SOUTHERN CAL. at UCLA
STANFORD at California
TEXAS CHRISTIAN at Rice
Wake Forest vs. S. CAROLINA
W. Virginia at MIAMI (Fla.)
YALE at Harvard

J4

~i° lle... GARY PAS

Selected by The American Football Coaches Association, this is the
original and most authoritative All-America. In Collier's, you'll find
the complete stories of all the men and some of the most spectacular
football action photos ever taken in color.
Crow.U.CouietPub.co., 640 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 19. N.Y. Publishers of Woman's Home Companion, collier's

By DALE CANTOR
When the tumult and the
shouting dies down after this foot-
ball season officially closes,
thoughts will instinctively turn
to next season.
There's bound to be a good deal
of attention centered around the

Come

to Church

player who should take the place
of a graduating All-American on
a football team. Certainly, there's
going to be, and already is, a lot
of talk about "who's going to re-
place Ron Kramer at left end."
From Berea, O.
The man slated to fill that gap-
ing hole in the lineup is Gary
Prahst, a sophomore from Berea,
0. (Incidentally, Prahst's home
town is pronounced Buh-REE-a.
However, he'll let you know about
it in short enough time if you
don't pronounce it correctly -
''just one of my habits,'' he says.)
But this is a football story and
here are some football facts about
him:
REMODEL that
OLD HAIR STYLE
with a New Design
715 N. University

The 6'4", 210-lb. end was an
All-Stater at Berea during his
high school career. He came to
Michigan and was immediately
spotted as a real comer while he
was on the freshman squad and
later during the spring drills.
So far this year, Prahst, play-
ing second string left end behind
Kramer, has shown a lot of prom-
ise. In the UCLA game, Prahst
went 31 yards on an end-around
play. He's caught three passes all
season, averaging 12 yards per
catch.
Also a Basketballer
Prahst is also a fine basketball
player and begins practicing on
the hardwood just as soon as the
football season ends.
Prahst is looking forward to a
coaching career and is now in the
School of Education. He seems to
have the ingredients needed for a
good coach - other than good
football sense, he possesses an
easy-going manner, a good sense
of humor, a winning smile, and
he seems to handle himself with
a generally poised manner.

DICK CRAMER (110-50-.687)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke,
Ill., Purdue, MSU, Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St., Pitt., USC,
Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
DAVE GREY (110-50-.687)--Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke, Ill.,
Purdue, MSU, 'Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St., Pitt., USC,
Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
* * * *
HANK ROSENBAUM (109-51-.681)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor,
Duke, Ill., Purdue, MSU, Tenn., N. Carolina St., Minn., Okla., Iowa,
Ore. St., Pitt., UCLA, Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
* * * *
JOHN HILLYER (108-52-.675)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke,
Ill., Purdue, MSU, Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St., Penn St.,
USC, Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
GUEST STAFF (107-53-.669)-ARTHUR BRANDON, Director of
University Relations-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke, NU, Purdue,
MSU, Tenn., N. Carolina St., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore., Pitt., UCLA,
Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
STEVE HEILPERN (107-53-.669)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke,
NU, Purdue, MSU, Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St., Pitt.,
UCLA, Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
* * * *
JIM BAAD (105-55-.656)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke, Ill.,
Purdue, MSU, Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore., Penn St., UCLA,
Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
* * * *
BRUCE BENNETT (100-60-.625)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke,
NU, Purdue, MSU, Tenn., Md., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St., Pitt., USC,
Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
AL WINKELSTEIN (100-60-.625)-Michigan, Ark., Baylor, Duke,
Ill., Purdue, MSU, Tenn., N. Carolina St., Minn., Okla., Iowa, Ore. St.,
Pitt., USC, Stanford, TCU, S. Carolina, Miami, Yale.
Read and Use Paily Classifieds

Sunday

A

I d

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Loucks and Mr. D. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone.
SUNDAY PROGRAM
9:45 A.M. Church School
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship. "Rekindling the
Devine Gift." Dr. Loucks will deliver the ser-
mon.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday, Nov. 25: Only the 10:45 Worship Serv-
ice. Sermon by the pastoron "Christian Pre-
paredness," lost Sunday of the Church Year.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Bible Study of GA-
LATIANS, "Christ Really Did Free Us."
SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Rood
Reverend Phillip L. Schenk
Phone: NO 2-4663
10:00 A.M. Sunday Services.
10:00 A.M. Church School.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGj
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:15 Meetings for Worship.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends Meeting.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M.,1 1:00 A.M., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 Nortn Division Street
SUNDAY PROGRAM
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
THANKSGIVING DAY
10:00 A.M. "Thanksgiving Service."
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:00 Morning Service
7.00 Evening Service
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
SUNDAY PROGRAM
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. "On Being in Debt."
Rev. Richard E. Crusius.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY
Two Morning Worship Services. 9:00 and 10:30
A.M.
7:00 P.M. Open House and Movie
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
SUNDAY PROGRAM - LAYMEN'S SUNDAY
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship: "Christ, the
Great Layman." Mr. James A. Cripper will
speak.
7:30 P.M. Worship and Program. Informal dis-
cussion of "Student's Problems in Christian
Beliefs."

II

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1 833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main St. Reading Room hours are Mon.,
11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Tues.-Sat. 11 :G

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