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November 20, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-20

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1956
HUNGARIAN, POLISH REVOLTS:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TAREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TIUIEE

Russian Control in Europe Teeters Dangerously

Television Center Sends
Film Throughout Nation'

By ROGER GREENE
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Drenched in blood, the seeds of
revolt behind the Iron Curtain
have been ruthlessly crushed to
earth by Soviet tanks in Hungary.
Does that mean they will never
grow again?
For the moment, at least, the
Western world's hopes that events
in Hungary and Poland might
trigger a general uprising against
Russian tyranny in Eastern Eur-
ope have faded.
But now that the shooting is
dying away, the rulers in the
Kremlin may be troubled by an
uneasy thought: If a decade of
Communist rule in Hungary and
Poland was not enough to squelch
a desire for freedom, will the de-
sire ever be extinguished?
The answer plainly seems to be
that the harsh Soviet control sys-
tem failed; that the satellite em-
pire - simply because it is an em-
pire - contains the seeds of its
own destruction. No one can now
doubt that revolution found a
hospitable soil in Hungary.
Communist fears that the Po-
lish and Hungarian bids for free-
dom might spread through the
rest of the Soviet satellite states,
stretching from the Baltic to the
Mediterranean, have been echoed
in the shrill outcries of puppet
leaders in those countries.
Even since Russia sent her tanks
to masscre the Hungarians, Red
leaders in Czechoslovakia, Bul-
garia, Romania, Albania and East
Germany have been filling the air
with threats against an attempt
at an uprising.
Czech Premier Siroky shouted
that an "iron fist" would crush
anyone trying to create disorder
in Czechoslovakia.
And the Communist rulers in
Bulgaria declared they would
"smash with an iron fist any re-
actionary forces" attempting to
foment a revolution.
Here, in brief, is the way the
situation sizes up in countries
along the Soviet perimeter:
Czechoslovakia - At present
there appears little likelihood of
a Polish-style "independence from
Moscow" movement.
The Czechs, with their flourish-
ing industry and rich natural re-
sources, hlave the highest living
standards among all the satellite
countries, Moreover, they are
bound to Russia by fear of Ger-
many.
East Germany - Russia has
over 400,000 heavily armed troops
in the Red half of divided Ger-
many. Under new "soft treatment"
by Communist leaders, East Ger-,
man resentment appears to have
dwindled since the workers' re-
volt of June 17, 1953.
Bulgaria - Historically a pow-
derkeg in the never-ending strug-
gle for power in eastern Europe,

NORTH SEA BALTIC SEA
: 3-1
,EAST ....5::: :
ERM4AY PC.AND :U.S.S.R.
GERMANYE
CZECHOSLOVAKIA'
SWITZ- AUSTRI::-%
HUNGARY
En ROMANIA
YUGOSLAV A
ITALY ADRIATIC YUGOSLAVIA
BULGA ASEA
Satellites under A..RBUAGAEAA
firm domination bI
......... .......2A LBA NIA
Areas previously;:.
controlled by Mos-:
Cow, but now either.:
:;:reor allegedly:::::G E C
ndependent of:: GGEN TURKEY
AEGEAN TRE
MEDITERRNEANSE ::::::SEA
Area temporarily ..
cped byRussi
MEDITERRANEAN SEA AP Newsfeatures

Bq ROSE PERLBERG
In a weathered old house out,
on Ann Arbor's Washtenaw Ave-
nue, a team of educators start
hundreds of television programs
on their way into the living rooms
of thousands of Americans.
The Educational Television and
Radio Center has neither cameras
nor studios. Its staff is, rather, a
"thinking group", that develops
and distributes programs on film
and kinescope to the 22 educa-
tional TV stations from coast to
coast, affiliated with the nation-
al organization. The programs are
produced for the Center by pro-
duction units around the coun-
try.
The Center was established in
1952, soon after the Federal Com-
munications Commission set aside
258 channels for the exclusive use
of noncommercial educational sta-
tions.
Not Connected With University
It was built in Ann Arbor, says
William A. Harper, Director of In-
formation, because the city is in a
good cultural and educational sit-
uation and is centrally located
with fine transportation facilities.
He added that, contrary to popu-
lar belief, the Center is not con-
nected with the University, but en-
Joys a warm relationship with it.
According to FCC rules, the sta-
tions' programs "should make the
viewer think, learn or do some-
thing." No commercials are al-
lowed. The Center supplies these
stations with some 25 per cent of
their programs.
Defines Role
H.K. Newburn, Center president,,
,defines his group's role as "cen-
tral in conceiving and testing a
design for television as an instru-
ment of education."
Foremost in the principles by
which the Center operates, he de-
clares, is the idea that all pro-
grams must be basically of an edu-
cational nature. Humor and oth-

er entertainment values are util-
ized whenever possible, but, he{
emphasizes, they are always the
means to an end, and never should
predominate.
' Programs are usually done in a
series, Newburn says, because edu-
cation itself 5s a continuing pro-
cess and little in the way of ba-
sic results can ordinarily be ex-
pected from a single performance.
$ Three Soures of Programs
The Center obtains its programs'
from three major sources: ex-
change among stations them-
selves, existing educational film
material, and'production under di-
rect contract.
Exchange of film material
among the 22 stations is a com-
mon practice. Newburn feels that
"one of the great advantages of
educational TV rests in the abil-
ity to re-use materials if the pro-
grams are of sufficient education-
al value." Series of programs are
often used concurrently by five or
six stations and then rotated.
In deciding which of existing
educational films to use for sta-
tion distributin, production men
from the Center must make ex-
tensive inventory of films avail-
able in this country and abroad,
as well as work out legal and oth-
er questions of clearance for TV,
Dr. Newburn said.
So far, Newburn said, the most
fruitful source of programs has
been direct production under con-
tract from the Center. The team
thinks up several potentialities,
and production men contract with
studios in different parts of the
counry that have the facilities
for filming the show or series.
The finished product, approved
and edited by Center personnel,
is sent to the Visual Aids Service
at the University of Illinois, with
directions for distribution to vari-
ous stations. The Service handles
all Center distribution.

Fraterity, Sorority Pledges
Prepare for MARC Drive
By RICHARD TAUB
RBBecause it is incurable, scientists
Plans are now underway for a have been studying causes of the
fund drive for the Michigan Asso- deficiency and ways to prevent it.
ciation for Retarded Children to Contribution to MARC can be
be-held Nov. 28. according to Steve sent to Box 2212 care of local post
Gage, '58, JIFC publicity chair-' office.
man.
Drive will be conducted by Junior
Interfraternity Council, Junior Orgaization
Panhellenic Association and local
Junior Chamber of Commerce. Nbotices
Ann Arbor JC's will supply cars
and drivers for the fraternity and.I
sorority pledges expected to parti- Congregational and Disciples Stu-
cipate in this project. dent Guild, mid-week tea, 4:30-6 p.m.,
The groups will canvass all Guild House.
homes in the Ann Arbor area. Each s *aC
sorrit wll roide18 leges IStudent Square Dancers, organiza-
Ss fraternitiesvidel18eletionai meeting, 7:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
aged to offer 10 each. Hillel. advanced Hebrew class, 7;30
Door to door collecting will take p in., Hillel.
place between 6:45 p.m. and 10:00 * * *
p.m. Hillel Players, meeting, 4:15 p.m.,
Gage emphasized that all the Hillel.
money collected will stay in the
Kappa Phi, Thanksgiving dinner,
local area. 5:15 p.m., social hall, First Methodist
About three per cent of all new- Church.
born children annually are men- * * *
tally deficient. Contrary to com- Chess Club, meeting, 7:30 p.m., Union
mon belief, mental deficiency is * * *
not curable. Undergraduate Math Club, meeting,
MARC aims t encourage educa :30 p.m., 3201 Angell Hall, speaker:
MARCaim toencorag edca-Prof. Leisenring.
tion to the limit of the child's
ability, and to encourage teaching Lutheran Student . A s s o c i a t i o n,
of personnel for work in this field. Thanksgiving service and breakfast, 7:10
Mental retardation is a condi- a.m., Wednesday, Chapel.
tion resulting from impaired or Congregational and Disciples Stu-
incomplete mental development dent Guild, open house after Tbanks-
dating from birth or an early age. giving, 7:15 p.m., Sunday, Guild House,
Win a
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I

RUSSIAN CONTROL ESTABLISHED
DEast Germany, 1945
®Eastern Zone of Austria, 1945
®Yugoslavia, 1945
MAlbania, 1945
Q Poland, 1947
0 Hungary, 1947
*Romania, 1947
Bulgaria, 1947
9 Czechoslovakia, 1948
Second conquest
of Hungary, November, 1956

RUSSIAN CONTROL BROKEN
Yugoslavia became independent
Communist nation, 1948
Russian troops withdraw
from Eastern Austria, 1955
Poland's Communist government
asserts independence from Moscow,
October, 1956
Q Hurigaria'n people revolt and
set up own government in late
October (Revolt crushed by
Russian tanks in early November)

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Bulgaria was also a bread basket
for years until Soviet-style col-
lective farming roused the ire of
the peasants and led to lean pro-
duction.
Recently the official Sofia radio
disclosed that Bulgaria is so short
of bread grains it had to request
an . emergency shipment from
Russia. Hunger and unrest go
hand in hand.

Poland-After the October up-
surge against Moscow, the Poles
for the moment seem content
with what they have won. Com-
munist party leader Gomulka has
told his country that "at all cost
we must avoid being dragged into
a military adventure."
Yugoslavia - Still sitting tight!
with Tito and his non-Soviet
brand of communism.

Austria - Soviet tanks rolled
up to the borders of eastern Aus-
tria early in November, during
the height of the Hungarian blood
bath, but withdrew without vio-
lating Austria's neutrality.
Albania - Still tightly in Mos-
cow's grasp,
HAPPY
THANKSGIVING
TO YOU ALL!
o11 BARBERS
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The Dascola Barbers
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Contest opens Auaust 15. closes October 15, 1956

iU

Tau Beta Phi Honors New Members

_.

Thirty-seven engineers were
honored by initiation into Tau
Beta Pi fraternity on November
13 at the Union.
The following graduate engi-
neers become members: Andrew
W. Fleer, shell Chemical Corpor-
ation, New York; Delmar S. Hard-
er, executive Vice-President of
Ford Motor Company, Detroit;
and John H. Hunt, General Mo-
tors Corporation, Detroit.
are: Robert L. Armstrong, 57E,
Eric M. Aupperle, '57E, James E.
Barger, '57E, Thomas R. Beirle,
'57E, William G. Billmeier, '57E,

Khalil I. Beilenjaneh, '57E, James
R. Blanchard, '58E, Richard R.
Born, '57E, Loren E. DeGroot,
'57E, Donald H. DeVries, '57E,
Robert H. Dye, '58E, Harry W.
Evans, '57E, Timothy Felisky, '57E
Patrick M. Finnegan, '57E, Duane
G. Fitzgerald, '57E, Walter H.
Gerdes, '57E, William J. Graess-
ley, '57E, John A. Kelinges, Rob-
ert E. A. Lillie, '57E, Charles B.
Malloch, Grad, Allan L. Miller,
'57E, John Ohrenberger, '57E,
Norman D. Postma, '57E, Arnold
M. Ruskin, '58E. John H. Moore,

'57E, Charles Schwartz, '57E, Ar-
nold Schutzberg, Grad., Robert G.
Smith, '58, John C. Steiner, '58E,
Harry C. Walker, Jr., '57E, Samuel
R. Ward, '58E, E. Peter Washa-
baugh, '57E, Thomas G. Winbek-
necht, '58E, and Rex J. Youse,
'57E.

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