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November 15, 1956 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-15

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PAGE SM

T-XE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NQVE7vML .16, 1956

WAGE SIX TflE MICUIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15,1956

Cultural Need of Students
Viewed By Guest Instructor

By DIANE LABAKAS
Prof. Mikel Dufrenne, a visiting
French philosophy instructor, rec-
ommends that American college
students receive a better cultural
background in either science or
language.
Prof. Dufrenne, who is teaching
at the University until Christmas,
explained that the lack of this
cultural background is due to in-
sufficient stress on cultural sub-
jects in high school.
"One thing I like about teach-
ing in American is that I can lec-
ture without interruption like they
do in France," he said. "Students
ask me questions after class."
Prof. Dufrenne began his teach-
ing career in the French secondary
school in 1933, before moving to
Poitiers University. "There is not
so large a gulf between the French
secondary schools and college as in
the United States," he declared.
Although college education is
free in France, not as many stu-
dents attend as would be expected
since secondary school is equiva-
lent to the first two years in col-
lege."
Prof. Dufrenne noted that al-
though most of the schools are
controlled by the government,
there are some private schools.
"Most students who graduate,
don't have much trouble finding
a job," he added.
Commenting on the present

-Daily-Dick Gaskiil
PHILOSOPHY INSTRUCTOR-Prof. Dufrenne recommends better
science and language background for American students.

LYL Group
Established
Here In '49
(Continued from Page 1)
lected the dinner money and, upon
instructions from an unknown par-
ticipant behind him, signed the
check "Henry Gerard."
After almost two months of ex-
cited investigation of the case,
Joint Judiciary Council penalized
five students with one semester of
social probation for "conduct un-
becoming a student." Of the five
students, four were LYL members
and the fifth was the unavoidable
Ed Shaffer.
Young Progressives' group died,
when it failed to turn in a mem-
bership list to the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs in the spring of 1953.
In the fall of 1953, LYL mem-
ber Paul Dormont announced the
folding of the Society for Peace-
ful Alternatives, of which he was
president. The Civil Liberties Com-
mittee also died out for lack of
interest.
Excitement returned in Decem-
ber, 1953, when State Chairman
Baxter admitted he had been sub-
poenaed by the Clardy Committee.
LYL had been cited as a Com-
munist-front organization by the
House Committee on Un-American
Activities on April 1, 1951.
After being subpoenaed by Clar-
dy, Baxter said he would refuse
to turn over membership and
financial records of the State LYL.
In April, 1954, it was revealed
that Sharpe and Shaffer were to
appear before the Clardy Com-
mittee.
Baxter appeared before Clardy's
committee on May 5, 1954, and
told the committee to "mind its
own business." Shaffer, who was
named by witnesses at the Detroit
hearings as a Communist, and
Sharpe appeared before Clardy on
May 10 in. Lansing.
Both refused to testify. The Uni-
versity took no action against the
two students.
From then on, LYL attempted
to do very little publicly.
LYL did kick up a minor fuss in
late February and early March,
1955, over the scheduled appear-
ance of the Berlin Philharmonic
Orchestra at the University on
March 15. A threatened demon-
stration did not happen.
The local League has not been
active in the public's eye since the
spring of 1955.
Still, it has been active behind
the scenes to a degree that gradu-
ally decreased throughout last
year. Since LYL has never been
active as a group during the sum-
mer and since it has not been
active this semester, its death date
can be set at June, 1955, the close
of last semester.
(Tomorrow: How LYL Operated)

(Continued from Page 4)
Lecture, auspices of the Department
of Philosophy. "Esthetic Values." (in
English). Mikel Dufrenne, professor of
philosophy, University of Poitiers,
France. 4:15 p.m., Thurs., Nov. 15, Aud.
C, Angell Hall.
Concerts
Recital by music education students.
8:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 16, Aud. A. Angell
Hall, sponsored by the Student Chap-
ter of the Music Educators National
Conference. Performers include Patri-
cia Glick and Patricia wright, sopra-
nos; Rocco Gioia, viola; Joan Gassa-
way, English horn; Ann Hoitgren, La
Rue Kendall and Jackie Mindlin,
French horns; Bruce McCormick, Rus-
sell Reed and Gary Stollstimer, trum-
pets; Marguerite Erickson, Marlene Har-
rington, Mary Lancaster, Susan Litch-
field, Ronald Rogers and Neva Vukmiro-
vich, pianists. Open to the general pub-
Academic Notices
All Students planning to meet the Di-
rected Teaching requirements for the
Secondary School Teaching Certificate
during the Spring Semester 1957, must
file their applications in Room 3206,
University High School before the end
of the present semester.
All Students planning to meet the
Directed Teaching requirements for
the Elementary School Teaching Certi-
ficate during the Spring Semester 1957,
must file their applications before the
end of the present semester. Application
blanks can be picked up in the School
of Education Office, 1437 University
Elementary School,
Orientation Seminar, Chemistry De-
partment. Thurs., Nov. 15, 7:00 p.m.,
Room 1300, Chemistry Building. Dr. M.
Tamres and Dr. R. C. Taylor will be the
speakers.
Physical-Analytical-Inorganic Chem-
istry Seminar. Thurs., Nov. 15, 8 p.m.,
Room 3005, Chemistry Building. Leonard
C. Labowitz will speak on "Vapor-Phase
Chromatography".
Organic Chemistry Seminar. 8:00 p.m.,
Thurs., Nov. 15, Room 1300, Chemistry
I .1

Building. John Callahan will speak on
"Reactions of Nitrocyclopropanes with
Alkali."
Applied Mathematics Seminar: (Math
(347). Thurs., Nov. 15, at 4:O p.m. in
Room 247. West Engineering Building.
Robert Wasserman will conclude his
talk on "A Formulation and Solution of
the Fluid Flow Equations." Refresh-
ments at 3:30 in Room 274, West En-
gineering Building.
Psychology Colloquium: "The New
Concept of Health - Physical, Mental,
and Social." Dr. Brock Chisholm, form-
er Director-General of World Health
Organization. Fri., Nov. 16, at 4:15 p.m.,
in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Astronomical Colloquium. Fri., Nov.
16, 4:15 p.m., The Observatory. Edward
A. Spiegel will speak on "The Criterion'
for the Onset of Convection In a Ra-
diating Atmosphere."
Doctoral Examination for Ronald Da-
vid George Crozier, Chemical Engineer-
ing; thesis; "Froth Stratification and
Liquid Mixing in a Bubble Tray Col-
umn", Thurs., Nov. 15, 3072 East Engi-
neering Building, at 11:00 a.m. Chiar-
man, G. B. Williams.
Doctoral Examination for William
Joseph Sullivan, Pharmaceutical Chem -
istry; thesis; "Cyclization of Amino-
methylcyclohexanones to Azabicyclooc-
tanones", Thurs., Nov. 15, 2525 Chemis-
try Building, at 2:30 p.m. Chairman,
F. F. Blicke.

Engineering Bldg. The Department of
Civil Engineering is sponsoring an
Open House at the new laboratory from
2 to 4 p.m. on Thurs., Nov. 15. Con-
ducted tours of the facilities and in-
door and outdoor demonstrations of
experiments and research techniques.
Take elevator in south wing to roof
and turn right. Staff, students, towns-
people and others invited.
Placement Notices
..The following school will be at the
Bureau of Appointments, on Nov. 20 to
interview for teachers for Feb., 1957.
Battle Creek, Michigan - All Elemen-
tary grades; Social Studies.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext.
489,
Personnel Interviews:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Bureau of Appointments:
Mon., Nov. 19
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Akron,
Ohio - plants and offices throughout
U.S. and world - men with any degree
for Sales Training. Retail Sales involves
serving customers, ordering merchaan-
dise, building displays, etc. Budget
Sales involves handling time payment
sales and control of customers budget
accounts.
Proctor & Gamble Co., Cincinnati,
Ohio - work in various areas - men
for Sales Training with opportunity to
progress to Supervisory and Manager-
ial positions.Primary requisites are an
interest in selling and a strong desire
for a career in Sales and Sales Mgt.
Mon., Tues., Nov. 19 & 20.
City of Easton, Pennsylvania -- men

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

and women with degree and extensive
background of courses in Recreation
and Playground Management for Rec-
reation Work with City Recreation De-
partment and Board of Education.
Tues., Nov. 20
Aeroquip Corp., Jackson, Mich. - po-
sitions in Mich., Ohio, Calif., and Can-
ada -- men with degrees in Liberal
Arts or BusAd for Sales Training and
Industrial Sales.
The Canada Life Assurance Co., Jack-
son, Mich. - offices in U.S. and Can-
ada - men with any degree for Sales
Management Training.
The Connecticut General Life Insur-
ance Co., Chicago, Ill. - work in Mid-
west - men with any degree for Sales
Management Training Program. Train-
ing is for Estate Analysis work.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
Personnel Requests:
Northwest Orient Airlines, Inc., St.
Paul, Minn., offers opportunities to
women interested in Flight Stewardess
positions. Training classes will be held
every five weeks from Novemberto
May. There will also be training during
the summer months although those
dates have not been exactly established
yet. The airline serves the U.S. from
coast to coast, Hawaii, Canada, Alas-
ka, Japan, Korea, Okinawa, Formosa,
Philippines and Hongkong.
Dunn Engineering Associates Inc.,
Cambridge, Mass., has openings for
graduates with any level of experience
in Electronics, Math, or Physics.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

Middle East situation, Prof. Du-
frenne declared that the French
government had no right to march
into Egypt because "when we pro-
voke war, it is wrong."
He noted that although the

Bones Provide New Method
For Archaeological Research

By JAMES BOW
A collection of bones is provid-
ing the basis for a research pro-
Ject of the anthropology depart-
ment.
One of the sponsors of the study
is the U.S. Army Quartermaster
Corps, which is interested in prov-
ing a means to identify war dead.
According to Prof. Fredrick P.
Thieme of the anthropology de-
partment, this research is also
providnig information in aspects of
the study of prehistoric man.
The essence of the research lies
in the fact that bones from ar-
chaeological diggings contain or-,
ganic matter which can give evi-
dence of the species and age of
prehistoric beings.
Prof. Thieme commented that
this type of research can be car-
ried on now because of "specifi-
cally developed microtechniques,"
and went on to explain the tests
which can identify the bone frag-
ments.
When an animal is injected with
a serum from another animal spe-
cies, it builds up an anti-serum,
and this anti-serum can then be
added to the extracted organic
material from the bone fragment.
If this bone fragment is from
the same species of animal as the
original serum, then there will be
a specific reaction when the anti-
serum is added.
For instance, if a rabbit is in-
jected with a serum from a human,
then the rabbit's anti-serum added
to the extraction from the human
bone fragment will give a speci-
fic reaction showing that the bone
was from a human being.
Furthermore, prehistoric bones
may be tested not only to dis-
cover their species, but might also

be examined to see how close a
pre-historic group was to niodern
man.
Prof. Thieme added that this
research can fill gaps in the study
of human evolution by studying
the organic matter in bones and
its rate of decomposition.
Thus, the age of a prehistoric
specimen might be determined by
a method different from the usual
methods of archaeological re-
search-that is, by finding out the
length of time it takes the organ-
ic matter in the bone to degrade
and other chemicals to form.
Blood types of groups can also
be found from bones, and,if the
frequency of blood types is dif-
ferent from those of races living in
the same area, then anthropolo-
gists have a better chance to dis-
cover the origin of certain races.
This study of the organic na-
ture of bones has been in process
for four years, sponsored by the
Army and the Wenner-Gren
Foundation for Anthropological
Research.
Billiard Show
To Be Given
Billiards champion Charlie Pe-
terson will be in the Union bil-
liards room all day today through
Saturday for free lessons and dem-
onstrations, according to Tim Fel-
isky, '58, of the Union staff.
A special program will take place
at 8 p.m. today in the billiards
room, with an exhibition of trick
shooting by Peterson. Ladies are
invited, the Union emphasizes, and
there will be no charge.

French standard of living has ris-
en a little during the past few
years, certain steel, coal, one make
of automobile, electricity, and ral-
roads are still nationalized.
"Socialism works better because
there is more organization and de-
cisions," he said. "Our railroads,
which are the best in the world,
are proof of this."
Orgvanization1
Notices
International Center, social hour,
4:30-6 p.m., International Center.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, meet-
ing,. 7:30 p.m., Upper Room, Lane Hall.
* * *
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion, 8 p.m., Fireside Room, Lane
Hall.
II Circolo Italiano, lecture, "The Art
of the Florentine Renaissance", 8 p.m.,
Michigan Room, League.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, vesper
service, 9:30 p.m., Student Chapel.
* * *
Modern Dance Club, meeting, 7:30
p.m., Barbour Gym.
Lutheran Student Association, splash
party, 7 p.m., Friday, Lutheran Student
Center.
* * *
Hillel, Sabbath services. 7:30 p.m.,
Friday, Main Chapel, speaker: Prof.
Philip J. Eving, "Directions for Signi-
ficant Living."

button-down collar
button-back

Events Today
Meteorological Laboratory, 5500

IIti

7

center back-piec
... the Ivy Leagueshirt
in tiny and bigger checks
.. . round collars with long
sleeves . . . pointed collars
with short sleeves . . . (Illustrated)
Ship'n Shore's soft-tailored,
short sleeved version in fine
woven gingham . . . campus
brights or muted tones . .
Sizes 30 to 38.

PERSONALIZED
CHRISTMAS.
CARDS

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Only the finest quality at prices that are fair.

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For MEN'Only
6g ieq''e Wld ).
YOU CAN OWN YOUR OWN TUXEDO
WITH WILD'S PAINLESS PAYMENT PLAN
Yes, we've decided to meet the problem head on for you,
and take steps to assure every man on campus the oppor-
tunity to easily own his own perfect-fitting, up-to-date
Tuxedo-without undue financial strain.
If you're wondering whether you need your own Tux
even with an easy payment plan, just take a look at the
calendar of events, and apply a little simple arithmetic.
If you rent a Tuxedo as little as once or twice a year,
you're money ahead to own your own-and the fact that
you'll look better and feel better is a free bonus. As to
when you'll use it, just check off this partial list of oppor-
tunities the balance of this year alone-

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ELECTRICAL

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If You Are Interested In
Electronic Research And
Development And The
"State Of The Art"

SENIORS-
Are you interested in Detroit as a work area?
*
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
*
CIVIL ENGINEERS
*
* SCIENCE MAJORS

Pledge Formals (Dec.)
Christmas dances (Dec.)
J-Hop (Feb.)

International Ball (March)
IFC Ball (March 30th)
Spring Weekend (May)

HERE'S HIGH FINANCE - THE EASY
WILD WAY ...
First, you select your Tuxedo at Wild's now, in Novem-
ber. Choose the modern style you prefer, in an all-year
light weight fabric, handsome light-weight satin collar,
skilfully tailored and perfectly fitted to make you look
like a millionaire. The cost is $49.95.
When you select your own Tux, in time for all the pre-
holiday events, you pay just $20. In January, you pay
another $15, and in February the balance of $16.45 (in-
cluding tax) and you're set for every social event for the
rest of your "Ann Arbor sojourn." You pay the same low
cost on this special plan as you would if you insisted on
paying cash-there are no interest or carrying charge-
just our sincere desire to help every Michigan Man have
a complete wardrobe of good looking clothes for every
occasion.
FORMAL ACCESSORIES CAN
BE INCLUDED
Wild's has every item you'll want to make your Tuxedo
ahcomplete and perfect outfit. These can be included in
the easy arrangement with your Tux. Talking about acces-
sories, have no fear that you'll be uncomfortable in a
stiff shirt-just take a look at our new soft-front, pleated
formal shirts, and you'll realize that "going formal" can
be just as comfortable as going out in your gray flannel

MONDAY, NOV. 18th Is The Date!!I
THE W. L. MAXSON CORPORATION IS INTERVIEWING
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AND HAS
CHALLENGING AND REWARDING CAREERS IN THE FIELD
OF
COMPUTERS * COUNTERMEASURES -
MICROWAVES * NAVIGATION
ORDINANCE * RADAR
ENGINEERING EVALUATION
See The Placement Office For The
Time Available On The Interview Schedule
and Make Your First Step Toward A

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