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November 10, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-10

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PAGE SIK

THE MICMGAN DAILY

9ATURDAY, N'OVEAMER,1A, 195R

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 10, 1~5R

MISSING ORDER BLANKS:
Organizational Difficulties Plague FBA

By DICK TAUB
Problems of Fraternity Buyers
Association are actually the prob-
lems of any young organization.
Inadequate organization, poor
public relations and campus resis-
tance to anything new have both-
ered the group.
For instance, four committee
chairman had to resign at the
beginning of the year because of
grades, according to Bob Talley,
'58 BAd., member of the board of
directors. "They didn't even tell
us, and we had to discover it for
ourselves when we got back to
school," he said.
Difficulty from lack of organi-1
zation arose when the reurning
officers discovered that they had
no order blanks. "We ordered them
as soon as we found out," Talley
explained, "and then they didn't
Bruno Heck
Sees Center,
U.S. Voting
Bruno Heck, a high official in
the Christian Democratic Union,
Germany's largest political party,
visited Ann Arbor this week to
observe the elections and to visit
the University's Survey Research
Center.
Heck is in the United States for
an extensive tour of study and
observation of the American poli-
tical system.
His major interest is in Am-
erican political parties - their or-
ganization, campaign methods and
campaign preparations. H is also
making a study of methods of
conducting public opinion polls. In
connection with this, he is in the
midst of a tour of a number of the
major polling organizations, in-
cluding the Survey Research Cen-
ter here.
Party Secretary
Heck, 30 years old, is Secretary
General of Germany's Christian
Democratic party. Chancellor
Konrad Adenauer is party chair-
man; Heck is a member of the
executive board, and is in charge
of organization, publicity and im-
plementation of party policies.
In accordance with his interest
in public relations, Heck is con-
cerned in his U.S. our twith the
management of public relations
and their constituents and be-
tween the White House and the
public.
Plans Conferences
Also on Heck's long list of plans
in his tour is a series of confer-
ences with leading American soci-
ologists on new methods of re-
search and analysis;. conferences
with political action leaders ini
labor unions on their activities and
techniues; and, if time permits, a
number of visits to primary and,
secondary schools, including ex-
perimental types.
Heck, a university graduate with;
a Ph.D., is a resident of Bonn,
.Germany. He has held a number
of high governmental positions in
Bonn, including Advisor to the
Ministry of Education, and execu-
tive assistant to the Minister of
Education. He is here as a parti-
cipant in the foreign leader pro-j
gram of the International Educa-
tion Exchange Service of the U.S.,
State Department.]

come. We found them a week later
in the basement of the Admini-
stration building."
Poor public relations has been
another problem. Many people on
campus don't know what FBA
stands for. "Gargoyle" obligingly
called it Fat Boys Association. A
girl wanted to know whether the
group "really bought fraternities."
Fraternities themselves become
unhappy if a delivery is late, or has
been filled improperly. "But they
have been really co-operative on
the whole," Talley * explained.
"There are just some tthat are
quick to let you know when there
is a mistake."
Some suppliers had a habit of
switching. Houses ordered No. 10
cans and if the supplier didn't
have them he'd send No. 21/2. This
made a great many cooks unhappy.
Some Resistance
Although 42 fraternities now
work with FBA, there has been
some resistance to the group.
"Some cooks were getting kick-
backs of about 5 per cent, from
their own suppliers," Talley said.
'Naturally they blocked the
change.",
He cited one cook who received
the same brand and quantity of
an item, she had been getting from
a local supplier and complained.
FBA would like to deal with
sororities. So far this too has been
resisted. "Some housemothers are
afraid that we will take control
of the ordering out of their hands,
and others just don't want to
change." Talley said, "Some have
loyalties to local dealers."
Send Order To FBA
However, FBA does not do the
ordering as such. Houses send in
their orders to FBA, brand names
and all-then they order from the
Wholesalers. Prices run about fif-
teen per cent less than what fra-
ternities were paying.
Last year, FBA helped to sell
about $10,000 worth of canned
goods a month.
To help with the organization
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Michigan. It plans, constructs, and
maintains the facilities required, oper-
ates them, and is responsible for busi-
ness contacts with customers and the
general public.
Amer. Telephone & Telegraph, Long
Lines Dept., Cincinnati, Ohio - work
in New York City, Cincinnati and Kan-
sas City, Kansas - men with degrees
in BusAd., Econ., H'umanities, and
other fields. A.T.&T. provides long dis-
tance interstate and overseas telephone
and teletypewriter exchange service.
Long distance interstate line service
including telephone, telegraph, tele-
photograph, radio, and television pro-
gram transmission.
Western Electric Co., Detroit - work
In East and Midwest states - men any
degree in BusAd., Econ., Humanities and
other fields for Management Training.
Western Electric Co. operates Manufac-
turing, Purchasing, Distributing and
Installing Telephone and Teletyp
equipment for the Bell system.
Wed. Nov. 14
1 The Kroger Co., Detroit - work in
Detroit, Midwest and South - men
with B.A., B.S., M.A., MBA and LLB
in Marketing, Personnel, Accounting,
Transportation, Retailing, Advertising
for Management Training in Merchan-
dising, Warehouse and Transportation,
Acctg, Real Estate, Personnel, Adver-
tiing, and Sales Promotion.
For appointments contact the Bu.
reau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

problem, the group has two pro-
grams. It plans to hire a full-time
employee who would be responsible
for answering phones, taking or-
ders and billing.
The second step is a student
tryout program which is already
underway. "We have about 15 try-
outs," Talley declared. "Which is
pretty good, seeing that we don't
get very much campus recogni-
tion."
Forty two fraternities, including
several professional groups now
are connected with FBA. The as-
sociation is planning to make
another bid for sorority interest.
Plans Expansion
Plans for expansion are am-
bitous, but will be a slow process.
The group has already handled
canned goods and introduced
fresh produce last spring. In the
future, it plans to deal with bread,
frozen foods, and possibly meat.
"The meat problem is a diffi-
cult one," Talley said. "We would
have to find a dealer who is scrup-
ulously honest, because only an
expert can tell the quality of meat,
before it is eaten."
The group intends to purchase
a warehouse.
Costs in Ann Arbor ar prohibi-
tive, so the projected storage place,
will probably be outside of town.
The group is trying to overcome
its difficulties, and in the mean-f
time, is still doing large business.1

Foreigners
To Observe
U.S. Holiday
Thanksgiving can take on a
deeper meaning as an American
festival, if shared with students
from foreign lands, according to
James M. Davis, director of the
International Center.
In a letter to the University andI
Ann Arbor community, he writes
that "this distinctively American
holiday with its emphasis on good
fellowship and outgoing friendli-
ness can be especially significant
if we invite visitors from other
lands."
"The student can find in such
an experience the warmth of our
hospitality . . . Many foreign stu-
dents have been so cordially re-
ceived into local families that
these American friends have been
able to fill some of the gaps of
loneliness which normally occur
when people are far from home,"
he said.
Those interested should contact
the International Center, by Nov.
20.
The names of the guests and
their addresses or phone numbers
will be made available to complete
the arrangements.
If the host lives very far from
the University, it is recommended
that he call for the students and
drive them to his home.

Ensian Record
To Feature
School Sounds
A recording featuring sounds
of the school year will be included
in the 1957 Ensian, Steve Simich,
'58, publicity chairman, has an-
nounced.
Excerpts from such top campus
entertainment as "Brigadoon", J-
Hop, and Varsity Night, a speech
by University President Harlan
Hatcher, the Glee Club, the Bur-
ton Tower chimes and football
commentaries are to be featured
on the 331/3 rpm recording.°
The record which will be simi-
lar to that included with the 1953'
and 1954 yearbook.
According to Simich the record
will add greatly to restoring mem-
ories of life at Michigan in the fu-
ture and serve as present listen-
ing enjoyment.
Journalism. Dep t.
SSponsors Lecture
Donald Shoemaker will present
a lecture on "Experiment in Jour-
nalism: An Outside Job," at 3 p.m.
Monday in the Rackham amphi-
theater.
The lecture is sponsored by the
journalism department. Shoemak-
er is the Executive Director,
Southern Education Reporting
Service, in Nashville, Tennessee.

Japanese Collection Of Silks On Display

and robes from ancient Japanesej
collections are now on display at
the University Museum of Art.
Three huge Buddhist priest
robes from the 17th to 19th cen-
turies illustrate the artistic abil-
ity of the Japanese and their
stress' of the past in their work.

By DIANE LABAKAS
The patchwork squares and ree-
Textile panels, student charts, tangles in the Buddhist priest

robes symbolize the tattered gar-
ments of Buddha in his mendicant
days. There are usually 48 pieces
in the main garment, which are
fastened together in definite ar-
rangements conforming to the us-
age of one or another of the 17
sects of Buddhism.
On these garments are always
superimposed six patches of an-
other pattern or color. The four
smaller patches represent the
Buddhist Guardian Kings and the
two larger ones the bodhisattvas
or disciples, Manju and Fugen.
19th Century Stencils
Silk stencils are represented from
the 19th century. The vogue for
stenciling on silk reached its
highest pitch in Japan during the
19th century when the technical
process of multi-color patterns
had to be perfected.
This mode of decoration per-
mitted far greater freedom in de-
signing than could be achieved on
a weaver's loom, then the chief
method of design. Important Jap-
anese brush artists actually made
the designs from these stencil pat-
terns. The stencils are primarily
of brocade, plain compound twill,
and carp and waves.
Woven Silks
Woven silks on display of 17th
and 19th century Japan derived

t^
-al-Harding Williams
FAR EAST ART
... silk stencils
their symbols and decorative con-
cepts from the Chinese. The de-
sign of the Japanese are virtual-
ly limitless and indicate extraor-
dinary taste and discrimination.
The display is on the second
floor of the University Museum of
Art and will remain throughout
the week.

-Daily-Harding Will ams
ORIENTAL PATTERN
. .. priest's robes

I

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ii
w

m

nIl

h TE lCA M P S

NORTH

ESIDENT

The Michigan Daily wishes to announce a delivery service
to North Campus Post Office starting morning of Nov. 13.
NOW YOU MAY HAVE THE MICHIGAN DAILY EACH
MORNING BEFORE CLASSES

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