100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 1956 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1956

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9,1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Chi Phi

ualifies

for B' Title

Game,

GRID SELECTIONS
With a slate of top games being played across the nation this
week, the Daily Sports Staff is submitting its predictions with fingers
crossed.
Having been soundly "outforecasted" by last week's faculty
guest, the staff will try to do better against this week's guest, Dean
of Men Walter B. Rea. ,
The winning contestant will receive two free tickets to either
the Michigan or State theaters so send in your entry and call your
date now if you feel confident,
Entries must be received at the Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard
Street, before noon today. There is still time if you hurry.
SELECTIONS
(Consensus selections appear in capitals.)
CONSENSUS (81-39-.675)

ATO, SAM, DU also Reach
I-M Grid Playoff Finals

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Illinois at MICHIGAN
Alabama at TULANE
California at Southern Cal.
CLEMSON at Maryland
Harvard at PRINCETON
Indiana at OHIO STATE
Iowa at MINNESOTA
Navy at DUKE
NORTHWESTERN at Wis.
Notre Dame at PITTSBURGH

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

OKLAHOMA at Iowa State
Oregon State at STANFORD
Pennsylvania at YALE
Purdue at MICHIGAN STATE
RICE at Arkansas
Tennessee at GA. TECH
Texas at BAYLOR
TEX. A&M at Southern Meth.
UCLA at Washington
Vanderbilt at KENTUCKY

By CARL BERNSTEIN
Chi Phi, with a 26-0 victory
over Chi Psi, qualified for the
first-place social fraternity "B"
football championship.
The game was highlighted by
the passing of Chi Phi's Dale
Ewart and by the victors' hard-
charging defensive line play.
Ewart pitched three touchdown
passes, all of them going 35 yards
or more.
Brown Scores Twice
One of Ewart's scoring heaves
went to Stu Shiefly, another to
Bob Pemberton, and a third to
Bob Brown. Brown scored the oth-
er Chi Phi marker on an inter-
cepted pass. The winner's defense
didn't allow Chi Psi to get off
their plays with any sort of pre-
cision.
Other games at South Ferry
Field yesterday featured sharp de-
fensive play. Alpha Tau Omega
edged Theta Xi, 6-2. The game
Iwas close all the way, with the
winning marker coming on a pass
from Fred Warner to George
Weemhoff.
In a third-place playoff game
Sigma Alpha Mureached the fi-
nals as they defeated Sigma Nu,
14-0.
DU, Tau Delts Victors
Fourth and fifth place playoff
games were won by Delta Upsilon
and Tau Delta Phi, respectively.
DU beat Psi Upsilon via the for-
feit route and the Tau Delts edged
Alpha Epsilon Pi, 6-0.
Professional fraternity play saw
Alpha Rho Chi win on forfeit from
Tau Epsilon Rho and Phi Delta
Chi squeeze past Phi Delta Epsi-
lon, 12-6.

In independent play, the All
Canadians downed the C.M.S.
Juniors, 7-0.
Other Games
The other two. independent
games saw the Double A's beat
the Newman Club, 6-0, and Gom-
berg Older Element down Jenkins
Jockeys, 6-0.
Night football action in the Res-
idence Hall "B" league had Reeves
beating Green, 20-0; Scott 7, Al-
len Rumsey 0; Hayden 6, Michi-
gan; Anderson 6, Lloyd 0; Cooley
13, Chicago 7; Taylor 8, Huber 7,
in overtime; and Wenley 6, Van-
Tyne 0.
Meanwhile social fraternity vol-
leyball showed Sigma Alpha Mu
downing Chi Phi 4-2; Phi Kappa
Tau 6, Delta Kappa Epsilon 0;
Phi Kappa Sigma 4, Delta Chi 2;
Sigma Nu 4, Alpha Sigma Phi 2;
Zeta Beta Tau 4, Delta Tau Delta
2; Sigma Phi Epsilon 5, Phi Sigma
Delta 1; Tau Kappa Epsilon4,
Zeta Psi 2; Sigma Alpha Epsilon 6,
Theta Delta Chi 0; Phi Kappa Psi
3, Psi Upsilon 3; Pi Lambda Phi
5, Kappa Sigma 1; Beta Theta Pi
6, Delta Sigma Phi 0; Chi Psi 6,
Phi Sigma Kappa 0, (forfeit):;
Alpha Epsilon Pi 3, Lambda Chi
Alpha 3; Theta Chi 6, Acacia 0;
Sigma Phi 5, Trigon 1; Delta Up-
silon 6, Triangle 0, (forfeit),
NHUL Scores
Boston 3, Detroit 1
Chicago 5, Toronto 2
Montreal 4, New York 2

DAVE GREY (86-34-.717)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clemson,
Princeton, OSU, Iowa, Duke, NU, Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale, MSU,
Rice, Tenn., Baylor, Texas A&M, Wash., Vand.

* "

*

STEVE HEILPERN (84-36-.700)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Md.,
Princeton, OSU, Minn., Duke, Wisc., Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale, MSU,
Rice, Ga. Tech, Baylor, SMU, Wash., Ky.

-Daily-John Hirtzei
WOODSON GALLOPS AGAIN-Fast stepping Abe Woodson, the
Big Ten's leading rusher, picks up yardage in the Illini's 25-6
upset of Michiganat Champaign last year, Woodson heads a fine
array of Illinois backs against the Wolverines at the Stadium
tomorrow.
Woodson Tops Big Ten
InlvNet Rushing Yardage
-I

You've been contacted by many;
companies, all offering many and'
varied advantages. But you owe it to
yourself to consider which of these
will, in the long run, offer a future
that will keep pace with your ability.]
At Martin you'll have a chance
to measure your background against
your c h o s e n' engineering field,
whether it is aerodynamics, elec-
tronics, nuclear, ,electrical, civil,
chemical or mechanical. Your future
will grow with an expanding coma'
pany, pioneering in tomorrow's sci-
ences as well as projects a decade in
advance-antigravity research and
ion propulsion.
Measure your opportunity now.
Contact your placement office for an
appointment with the Martin repre-
sentative visiting this campus
NOVEMBER 12, 1956
made from pure virgin Scottish wool..,
HARRISTW

*

*

GUEST STAFF (83-37-.692)-WALTER B. REA, Dean of Men-
Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clemson, Princeton, OSU, Minn., Navy, NU,
Pitt., Okla., Ore. St., Yale, MSU, Ark., Tenn., Baylor, SMU, UCLA, Ky.
JOHN HILLYER (83-37-.692)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clemson,
Princetaon, OSU, Minn., Duke, Wisc., Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale, MSU,
Ark., Ga. Tech, Baylor, Texas A&M, UCLA, Ky.
DICK CRAMER (82-38-.683)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clemson,r
Princeton, OSU, Minn., Duke, NU, Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale, MSU,
Ark., Ga. Tech, Baylor, Texas A&M, UCLA, Vand.
* * * *
JIM BAAD (81-39-.675) -Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clemson,
Princeton, OSU, Minn., Duke, NU, Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale, MSU,
Rice, Ga. Tech, Baylor, SMU, UCLA, Ky.
HANK ROSENBAUM (81-39-.675)-Michigan, Tulane, USC,
Clemson, Princeton, OSU, Minn., Duke, NU, Pitt., Okla., Ore. St., Yale,
MSU, Rice, Tenn., Baylor, Texas A&M, UCLA, Vand.
AL WINKELSTEIN (78-42-.650)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clem-
son, Princeton, OSU, Iowa, Duke, Wisc., Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale,
MSU, Rice, Ga. Tech, Baylor, Texas A&M, UCLA, Vand.
BRUCE BENNETT (77-43-.642)-Michigan, Tulane, USC, Clem-
son, Princeton, OSU, Minn., Navy, NU, Pitt., Okla., Stanford, Yale,
MSU, Rice, Ga. Tech, Baylor, SMU, UCLA, Ky.

Big Ten statistics released yes-
terday emphasize the opinion that
Michigan will have its hands full
tomorrow with Illinois' running
attack.
Heading the array of top rush-
ers in the Conference is Abe
Woodson, the Illini's hurdler
turned halfback, with a 5.9 av-
erage per carry. He is also in a
three way tie for the Conference
scoring leadership with 24 points.
Woodson, a senior who has been
plagued with injuries in his two
previous campaigns, has netted
445 yards on the ground on 75
carries.
His closest rival is Purdue's pile-
driving fullback, Mel Dillard, who
has gained 367 yards, for a 4.5
average per try. In 82 carries this
year, Dillard has never been
stopped for a loss!

The Boilermaker's Len Dawson
leads in both passing and total of-
fense. He has gained a total of 582
yards, 576 of them through the air.
Kramer leads the Conference
in pass receiving, with 18 catches,
good for 153 yards and one touch-
down.

Ii . iii

OLYMPIC TRACK EVENTS:
Americans Weak in Distance Races;
1500 Meter Run Pits World Greats

,4 Catto Pa,,e
As a group of Christian students, we feel a particularly acute concern
for world tensions, especially as they have come to a head in the recent
developments in Hungary and the Near East. We believe that Christ
remains the hope of the world and the reconciler of men, especially
in times of upheaval. In the present situation, when a sense of frustration
and helplessness stifles the constructive response of individuals, we are
compelled to come together in prayer.
Knowing that there are others who share our concern and feel the
need for community prayer we ask you to join us for this purpose. The
First Methodist Church has agreed to let us use their facilities for a
campus and city-wide gathering on Saturday, November 10, at 10:00 a.m.
DATE: SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
TIME: 10:00 A.M.
PLACE: FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 SOUTH STATE STREET

By AL JONES
(This is the second in a series of
fourharticles aboutntrack and field
events in the 1956 Olympic Games.
This article discusses the distance
events.)

While the Americans are strong
in the shorter races, they are cor-
respondingly weak in the distance
events that will compile the com-
ing Olympic Games at Melbourne,
Australia,
The 1,500 meter run, slightly
shorter than our American mile,
begins the chain of distance
events. The race should be the
most exciting event ofof the games,
pitting all of the great milers of
modern times excepting Sandor
Iharos of Hungary and Wes Santee
of the United States.
Tabori, Nielson Favored
Iharos, chosen the outstanding
distance runner of 1955, shares
the world record for the 1,500 at
3:40.8 with Laszlo Tabori also of
Hungary and Gunner Neilson of
Denmark. Nevertheless, Iharos
Schosen to concentrate on
onger races. Santee, of course, is
not eligible to compete.
This leaves Tabori and Neilson
the favorites, although many peo-
ple are looking for a triumph by
the great miler John Landy of
Australia.

Other top runners who will be
competing include Jim Bailey of
Australia and Ron Delaney of
Ireland. Both men have collegiate
competition in the United States
behind them and have broken the
4-minute mile. Istvan Rozsavolgyi,
who recently ran an unofficial
3:40.6 is another Hungarian who
figures highly.
With such a field of talent, Am-
erican runners Jerry Walters of
Los Angeles, Ted Wheelerof of

Iowa, and Don Bowden of Califor-
nia don't appear to have much of
a chance.
The three longer distance races
also seem to be closed to high Am-
erican finishes, except perhaps
John Kelley in the Marathon. The
competition in these long races
includes such all-time greats as
Iharos of Hungary, Vladimir Kuts
of USSR, Emil Zatopek of Czech-
oslovakia and Gordon Pirie of
Britain.

f II

the tweed
with a
college tradition!
spun, hand-woven
and finished
in the
Outer Hebrides
(SOItlaxd)
The discerning man
knows there is something
unmistakable in HARRIS
TWEED-the way it cuts,
drapes, wears and looks. The
way it sets you apart from
the crowd. When visiting
your local college store for
a sports jacket, suit or over-
coat, make sure you insist on
genuine HARRIS TWEED-
for wear, design and
distinction. You'll never
again settle for less!
HARRIS TWEED is certified
genuine by marks on cloth
and labels. Tailors create
therefrom, garments in dis-
tinctive styling and tailoring
qualities ranging to $125
in price.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
ENGI N EERS
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical Company, a medium
sized basic chemical producer in Pittsburgh, Penn-
sylvania, offers a variety of challenging opportunities
for graduate engineers in its Chemical Division ex-
pansion program.
CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERS-
For process development, project engineering, corro-
sion engineering, product research.
CHEMISTS-For process, physical, organic chemis-
try.
To set up an interview appointment or to get further
information, please contact Mr. John G. Young,
College of Engineering. Company representatives
will be on campus Friday, November 9.

Let
it
rain!
SISTER,
YOU'RE THE
SKIPPER
IN
SOUWESTER
U.S.
Fa en Omlte-SO.

O}DOf tRAD( .ZLSPUtt, WAKOWq r
1O CERM R CLOTH NLY?
~ C
4 HANDWOVEN j
S PURE SCOTTISH WOOL IG.
a MR~h ATTACIHD BY UCENSL rMOM o
< ARRIS IWIID ASSOCIAhIO1I VD . .in.

The Harris Tweed Mark is owned and administered
by The Harris Tweed Association Ltd., London, England
for U. S. Inquiries:
Suite 801, 110 East 42 Street, New York 17, N. Y.

E

W

Mir1tiqan

~~A&~

wishes to announce

CAPS
VERY

Take command of sassy weather like
an old salt in these saucy Sou'wester
U. S. Gaytees. Wear them with the
flashing metal buckles fastened or
flapping. Sou'westers pull over shoes
easily, keep 'em slick as a whistle.
And to clean Sou'westers, just wipe
inside and out with a damp cloth.
They dry for instant wear. Get
Sou'wester U. S. Gaytees now.
$3.95
Yellow, red, blue;
{ black or white, with
crdroyrntrim.

HARRIS TWEED
TOPCOAT
$4995

Matching
U. S. Raynster®

DEL

.

101

.fir..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan