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September 17, 1956 - Image 34

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-09-17

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THE MICHIGAN" DAILY

MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 17.1950-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MONDAY. V.EPTEMI~F1t 1'!. 1!~4

l{i 1.l AJ 1V
III Fw

Liss Mac' Guides League Social Activities

By SUE RAUNHEIM
s one enters the Undergraduate
ice of the League, she cannot
P but meet the sparkling, vi-
ous little woman who guides
League Social activities.
his is Miss Ethel McCormick,
wn to most as "Miss Mac".
'his lady, whose dynamic en-
y is quite amazing, takes an
.ve interest' in all League ac-
ties. When asked which is her
orite social event, she answers,
have a special interest in ev-
hing."
owever, this past semester theI
v coed Sophomore Show has
en up much of her time and
can't help praising all the
ticipating students. She pre-
.5 "this show will be a great
cess because the students work-
on it are enthusiastic, and de-
dable." Miss Mac is- delighted
he way the men students work
nformally with the coeds.
Physical Ed. Instructor
hiss Mac started her career
a physical education instructor
he Detroit Public School sys-
. At that time, Prof. Margaret
1 was head of the Physical Ed-1
tion Dept. at the University
1 was building up her staff. Miss

tor for the League, a position she
has held ever since.
When the League was first get-
ting underway, a library was form-
ed. However only volunteer librar-
ians were employed because the
League could not afford to pay
one. Many books left the library
and never returned so this system
was stopped. *
Silonsored Classes
The League-sponsored bridge
classes, dance classes and form-
ed a budget so that soon enough
money was in the Treasury to hire
a fulltime librarian.
In the early 30's a Freshman
Pageant was held on Palmer Field
in which Freshman students could
sing and dance out in the air.
However, Miss Mac chuckled, "It
always seemed to rain when we
were having this event."
As the enrollment grew larger,
Frosh Weekend was substituted for
Freshman Pageant. This consists
of two teams, the Maize and Blue,
who vie for honors in a series of
events taking place on one week-
end in the spring.
With a twinkle in her eye, Miss
Mac spoke of her hobbies, the the-
atre and music. She mentioned
that she used to go to New York
each Christmas and take in all

ETHEL McCORMICK

Mac was recommended for a po-
sition and in a short time was
made an Assistant Professor.
The coeds used to practice for
their different shows at Barbour
Gymnasium where Miss Mac
taught, so she became acquainted
with many of them. In 1933 she
was asked to be the social direc-

the shows.
Music Fan
Besides the theatre Miss Mac is
an avid music fan. She prefers
orchestral music, her favorite be-
ing Bach.
Miss Mac believes that a Fresh-
man should take part in extra
curricular activities upon entering
the University but should allot
sufficient time for study also. She
suggests that each student form a
schedule for study, play and class-
work.
"During orientation," Miss Mac
mentioned, "the Freshman becom-
es acquainted with all the diff-
erent campus activities and sees
for himself the information writ-
ten up in pamphlets. Then the'
student can choose for himself
the phase of activities he wants
to enter."
Miss Mac feels a great pride and
joy in the women of today. She
thinks they are responsible, co-
operative and take their work ser-
iou ly. "The success in their pro-
ject ," she fervently declared, "is
due to the enormous amount of
hard work they put into them."
Miss Mac stresses League Night
importance. This event which tak-
es place during orientation week
is a good chance for students to
get started in activities. Miss Mac
recommends that all women at-
tend this function.
On this night women draw their
teams for Frosh Weekend, which
is the principal activity for first
year students. It has become a tra-
dition that the Maize and Blue
Teams each offer a dance and
floorshow.
I-hop, the big all-campus dance,
offers women students an oppor-
tunity to work on decorations.
This is sponsored by the inde-
pendent groups.
It is no wonder that the League's
s o c i a 1 activities function so
smoothly and with such enthus-
iasm. They have Miss Mac behind
them !
Ladies'
Hollywood Blended
Hair Styling
by
715 N. University
1:'':,...,a:1 imt:0'':T N Ei4."iJt.':i':.u.,........u......w:":...

WELCOME STUDENTS
H ALLER'S JEWELER
Serving Michigan Since 1858
DIAMONDS... ORANGE-BLOSSOM RINGS
WATCHES .. . SHAEFFER PENS
CLOCKS and JEWELRY
HALLER'S
UNIV EERSERHL
717 NORTH UNIVJEWELEARS HLL AUDITORIUM
da e : n>

Work Begins Already as Ten New Chairmen
(Make Big Plan s for 7957J-Ho p Weekend

Look Smart, Be Smart!
BUY NAMES YOU KNOV

J-Hop, the annual dance pre-
sented by the junior class, will
mark its 80th year, as the class of
'56 takes over the affair to be
held between semesters.
Already beginning work on the
dance which highlights the Uni-
versity's social life are the ten J-
Hop chairmen chosen in an all-
class election. Heading this year's
weekend is Steve Simich.
Assisting Simich are finance
chairman, Mike Gordon; building
and, grounds head, Art Epker;
booths chairman, Mike Jackson,
and Ann McDonald who is in
charge of the band.
Other central committee mem-
bers who will plan the 1957 J-Hop
are Pat Skelly, bands; Marilyn
Houck, publicity; Shelly Baum,
special events; Bunny Lifshey,
tickets and Vera Ptak, patrons,
programs and favors.
Band Poll
At a poll conducted during reg-
istration, students will vote for
the orchestras they would most
like to have play for the affair.
Miss MacDonald and her commit-
tee will then try to secure the top
two bands for a one night stand.
With the dance held on Friday,
other events will be scheduled by
Baum to round out the full week-
end. Last year's festivities includ-
ed a weekend ski trip, a splash
party and an informal dance on
Saturday evening, as well as the
traditional fraternity breakfasts
and parties.
For this most special weekend,
men move out of their fraternity
houses, permitting coeds to stay
there overnight. Late permissions
of 4 a.m. on Friday and 2:30 am.
on Saturday are granted to Uni-
versity coeds for the J-Hop week-
end.
"Rebelaire," presented by the
class of '57 last February, fea-
tured a southern plantation
theme, with dancing to the music
of Les Brown and Tommy Alex-
ander.
Colorful History
Riots and campus feuds fill the
colorful history of .J-Hop's 80
years of existence on the social
calendar.
The first hop dates back to Feb-
ruary, 1877, when a "merry score
r t
4:$
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---HOP COMMITTEE-The ten members of the 1957 J-Hop committee are already started on their
plans for the big weekend. Members of the junior class, these students will completely plan and or,
ganize a whole weekend of events. Last year's festivities included a ski trip, a splash party, the big
dance itself, a smaller infromal dance on Saturday evening and traditional fraternity breakfasts and
parties.

of couples swayed to the harmo-
ny of a four-piece orchestra." Re-
portedly the oldest social event at
the University, J-Hop has grown
from that small beginning.
After four years the party was
taken over "in name and nature"
by Greek letter societies, and
promptly dubbed "Society Hop."
During this time it was given at a
M a i n Street emporium called
"Hank's."
Even in the early days, J-Hop
was a signal fora weekend of gai-
ety, which included such events
as a play by the Comedy Club,
combined recitals by the Univer-
sity choral groups and fraternity
dances.
J-Hop Grows
By 1891 J-Hop required the mu-
sic of two bands and a new site.
described as "an old rink down-
town." The following two years it
was presented at a dancing acad-
emy,-with the price of admission
raised to $1 per couple!
One year saw independents and
four outcast fraternities hold one
dance in Waterman Gym while
the nine other campus fraternities
took their dance to Toledo.
The Regents soon stepped In to
smooth out difficulties, ruling that
in the future, affiliates and inde-
pendents would have equal repre-
sentation in planning for one big
dance.
The 1900 J-Hop was unique in
that there were "a large number
of coeds present-more than at
any previous hop." This was un-
usual because coeds were not con-
sidered desirable dates in those
days and most partners were girls
from the men's hometowns.
Once Banned
In 1913, hop officials ruled that
no spectators be admitted to the
dance. When met with barred
doors, a group reported as "part-
ly students and partly riff-raff"
stormed the entrance and with the
aid of a gas pipe, rammed their
way into the dance.

They were fended off by a hero-
ic janitor equipped with a pair of
Indian clubs, and the battle en-,
sued with stones and fire extin-
guishers.
It was also discovered that "sev-
eral couples at the Junior Hop had
danced in a manner that could
hardly be called proper." This re-
ferred to the tango and the rule

that "tangoing in all its intrica-
cies and convolutions will be
barred hereafter at Michigan Un-
ion dances."
Thus the 1914 J-Hop was
banned.
Recent J-Hops have been rela-
tively more calm, but still preserv-
ing the wonderful fun and festivi-
ty of the past.

Union Facilities Enlarged;
Many Improvements Made

By NANCY LEIGHTON
University men will find facil-
ities for relaxation and recreation
inside the ivy-trimmed walls of
the Union, the campus men's club
founded by students more than
50 years ago.4
A $30,000 project to enlarge and
remodel the brick building by add-
ing a wing on its north side was
completed this year. The wing
provides a large basement cafeter-
ia and a snack bar.
On the first floor, kitchen f a-
cilities for the main dining room
have been expanded.
The only addition to the second
floor, which houses the billiard
room, the main ballroom, pingpong
tables, lounges and the Pendleton
Library, is a corridor along the
front of the new wing.
Listening Booths
The corridor is lined with booths
for listening to records. It has
been planned with an eye toward
future building on the front of
the Union and on the second and
third floors.
Extensive improvements in the
plumbing and electrical facilities
that keep the Union's many serv-
ices in operation have also been
made.
The new wing supplements the
many services already offered by

and LOVE

1

the Union. Besides billiards and
pingpong for students' spare time,
there is a bowling alley in. the
sub-basement and a swimming
pool in the basement. The pool
may be used only by Union mem-
bers and their guests.
All male University students au-
tomatically become members of
the Union upon payment of tui-
tion fees. Their student identifi-
cation cards are punched by Union
officials at registration, enabling
them to use Union facilities.
Activities Program
Besides its elaborate physical
plant, the Union has an exten-
sive program of student activities
directed by the Student Offices
where students plan and carry
out many different kinds of social
activities, student services and oth-
er programs.
Visitors to the campus can find
comfortable accomodations in the
Union's approximately 200-room
hotel. Lodging accommodations
are especially popular on football
weekends when the Union becomes
a bedlam of excitement and post-
game celebrations.
Although the Union Is. a men's
club, women are allowed liberal
use of the building. Even the old
taboo of not allowing women to
use the front door has died out
after years of its being ignored
anyway.
Long the scene of many special
events, the Union's popularity is
evidenced by its share of satirical
criticism. Students used to enjoy
poking fun at the old basement
cafeteria and the tables where
graduating seniors carved their
initials every year. But the stud-
ents insist that it's all in pursuit
of fun and continue to take ad-
vantage of the Union's services and
facilities.

" JONATHAN LOGAN
" BOBBIE BROOKS
" DALTON OF AMERICA
" JOHNNY HERBERT
" PETTI
* JOAN MILLER
" CANTERBURY
" ROSECREST,
" SHIP 'N' SHORE
" ROSE MARIE REID
" NATLYN JRS.
* EMMA DOMB

I

tl

* JERRY GILDEN
* BETTY ROSE
* STROOKE
* HENRY ROSENFELD
! SPORTEEN
* ST. MARYS
! HAL MAR

! CARMIE
! FRANKLIN
! MAURICE HANDLER
* RING CLEAR HOSIERY
* TEENA PAIGE
* DONNEYBROOK
" SMART MODES
* RHEA

ยง1 he Van .JIuren Sh
presents
THE FINEST LINE
of
FOUNDATION GARMENTS
GIRDLES- BRASSIERES
Expertly Fitted

k.

* JANE IRWILL

ROBES- LINGERIE
HOSIERY

f
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,.,

nID dL f. f-lL

- - I

W4;

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