100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


i

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3,1959

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 'THREE

e

tt t

4,b ud

Against

Iowa

Ifjuries Cile Michigan;
Barr To See Limited Action,

NAVY MEET IRISH TODAY:
Three Top Games Scheduled in East

<'

(Continued from Page 1)
and Ed Shannon, while linemen
Al Sigman and Willie Smith are
still limping.
Guard Jerry Marciniak, with a
chest injury, is completely lost
for today's action.
in owa at present ranks second
ithe nation in rushing defense,
giving up only an average of 113.8
yards a game. Navy so far ranks.
first, yielding only about 2.5 yards
a carry. On pass defense, the
Hawkeyes have snared 10 inter-
ceptions in five contests.
Hawkeyes Use Wing-T
Offensively, Iowa has been im-
proving as it employs a wing-T
All members of the Michigan
Soccer Club are requested to
meet at the I-M building by
2:15 today prior to the game
with the Kalamazoo Soccer Club
at 3:00.
-John Hunting, Manager
formation with a balanced line,
something new under Coach For-
est Evashevski (Michigan '41).
Iowa's starting forward wall
from tackle to tackle averages
217, and about 208 overall. Only
four starters are seniors, out-
standing veterans quarterback
Ken Ploen and halfback Don Do-
Recor, Set
By 1PO'Brien
- Parry O'Brien, who breaks the
shot put record almost every time
he throws the weight, shattered
his world mark Thursday with a
heave of 63 feet, 2 inches at the
final workout of the American
Olympic trackl and field team.
This marked the 12th time this
year, that O'Brien has bettered
his official world mark of 60 feet,
10 inches.
In the same meet, a mile relay
team composed of Charlie Jenkins,
Tom Courtney, Lon Spurrier and
Lou Jones chalked up a new world
mak by covering the distance in
3:07.3, a full second and a half
faster than the established record.
Hal Connolly adaed to the,,rgq-
ord shattering performances with
a hammer throw of 224 feet, 10%/
inches that bettered the old mark
by over 13 feet.

brino, and center Don Suchy and
end Frank Gilliam.
Iowa, however, will probably use
two complete teams, while the
Wolverines again may be forced
to substitute individually. The
Michigan defense is set for bruis-
ing line play.
Of interest to the scattered
,Michigan contingent here (2,200
tickets sold in Ann Arbor) and
the large radio audience will be
whether Oosterbaan will try All-
American end Ron Kramer at
right halfback in the absence of
Barr.
Kramer May Play Halfback
Kramer has been working out
in the backfield some during the
intense practices this past week,
but Oosterbaan would prefer to
use him only in an emergency.
The Michigan team arrived in
Cedar Rapids by plane yesterday
afternoon and spent the night
there. It is traveling the short
distance by bus to reach the Sta-
dium here about an hour-and-one
half before game time.
The MichiganMarching Band
is due in this morning by train
and will make its first appearance
in the Iowa Stadium with a full
show planned.

By BRUCE BENNETT
A general stereotype for Easternc
football this year is a de-empha-r
sized program, but the schedule
for today seems to belie this.
There are three top notch gamest
in the East today-at Baltimore,
Syracuse and West Point, N. Y. In
probably what is the most im-t
portant of the three, Notre Dame
will attempt to get out of its
season long doldrums when theyc
play Navy in Baltimore Memorialr
Stadium.
Irish Seek Second Win
The Irish, winners of only onex
of five games this year, figure to1
give the Middies a rough afternoont
of football. They are in a venge-1
ful mood, following successive
pastings by Michigan State andE
Oklahoma on, the last two Satur-
days.I
To the North, in Syracuse, two

of the best independents in the
country, Penn State and Syracuse,
meet. Both have compiled impres-
sive records this fall and each hold
upset wins over some of the na-
tions top teams.
Army will attempt to prove that
it has finally shaken the slump
that hitit early in the season.
Last week it walloped Columbia
60-0 but Colgate, upset winner
over Yale last Saturday, provides
much stronger competition.
Unbeaten Georgia Tech and
Tennessee face stiff tests today in
preparation for their math at
Atlanta Ga., next Saturday. Tech
travels to Durham, N.C., to play
Duke and Tennessee meets Jim
Tatum's improved North Carolina
eleven.
A full schedule is slated in the
red hot 'Southwest Conference.
Texas A&M, SWC leader at this

point, entertains Arkansas, while
the Mustangs of SMU, pursuing
hot on the Aggies heels, travel to
Austin, Tex., to play a green Texas
outfit.
The most important game of
the season in the Big Seven takes
place today. Colorado, chief chal-
lenger to Oklahoma's nine year
supremacy in the loop, meets the
Sooners at Boulder, Colo.
On the West Coast; Stanford
and Oregon State, the prime can-
didates for the Rose Bowl, each
meet formidable opponets- the
Indians play UCLA while the Bea-
vers engage Washington in Port-
land, Ore.
Oregon plays, California and
Southern Cal takes on Washing-
ton State in other Pacific Coast
Conference action.

JIM PACE-Michigan's fleet halfback is shown trying to elude Iowa tacklers as he drives to the Iowa
two in last year's homecoming contest. With a brilliant second half comeback, the Wolverines over-
came Iowa leads of 14-0 and 21-7 to win 33-21. Jim Maddock's long passes of 65 and 60 yards to Ron
Kramer and Tom Maentz resulted in three quick scores in the final quarter.
USSR HAS LARGEST TEAM:
Olympic Entries Set Ne ecr

1

Come

to Church

Final listings of the Olympic Or-
ganizations Committee showed a
record number of 74 teams entered

Commenting on Iowa earlier for the 1956 games at Melbourne
this week, Coach Evashevski said, Nov. 22-Dec. 8.

"These Iowa boys . . are not a
great club but they have done
more with what they possess than
I ever imagined they would."
The word is that 'the Hawkeyes
have been pointing to this one
since the beginning of the season,
especially since there are three
other former Michigan players on
the coaching staff here - assis-
tant Coaches Chalmers "Bump"
Elliott ('48) and Archie Kodros
('40), and freshman Coach Jerry
Burns ('50)
T eamRecords

1-1. -- ---. --

,
: ,
.

The old record for total entriesI
was set in 1952 when 69 nations
participated in the 1952 games at
Helsinki, Finland.
However, due to the present
Middle East conflict Britain and
France might not send their teams.
Egypt withdrew from the games
some months ago.
Avery Brundage, president of
the International Olympic Com-
mittee, has stated that Britain and
France, even if they are at war,I
could enter the games if they so
desired.
Brundage said, contrary to ru-
mors circulated at the recent AAU
convention in Los Angeles, that
he knew of no IOC regulation that
prevented countries at war from
competing in the Olympics.
The total of participating ath-
letes has been estimated at 4,985
with Panama still to name the size
of its enry.
Part of the Russian contingent
of 510 athletes and officials, the
largest in the games, arrived yes-
terday with the rest scheduled to
reach Australia tomorrow.
The United States entry of 497,
the second largest in the games,

will begin to arrive on special char- house the athletes, an interna-
tered planes Nov. 8. Australia, the tional incident was almost caused
host nation, will enter 360. when the Chinese Communist flag
Last Monday at the opening of was mistakenly placed in front of
the Olympic village, which will 'the Chinese Nationalist quarters.
n
Get the full story
from Olin Mathieson

Sunday

. I

27
14
13
34
21
42
0
48
34
7

IOWA
Indiana
Oregon State
Wisconsin
Hawaii
Purdue
5 Wins-0 Losses
MICHIGAN
UCLA
Michigan State
Army
Northwestern
Minnesota
3 Wins-2' Losses

0
6
7
0
20
13
9
14
20
20

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Loucks and Mr. D, Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone.
9:45 A.M. The Bible Class continues its study of
the New Testament with the Book of Joshua.
11:00 A.M. The Worship Service is "Drink Ye All
of It." Sermon by Dr. Loucks.
6:45 P.M. Professor Slosson of the History De-
partment will present "A Christian View of
Domestic Issues."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor on "The Case For
Organized Christianity."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Open Forum on Re-
ligious Questions.
Wednesday at 8:00: November Chapel Assembly
Meeting.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 'A.M. Unitarian Church School.'
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group - Prof. Tasugi
from Kito University Japan, will discuss "The
Economic Situation in the Orient."
11 A.M. Services of Worship. Rev. Randall S. Hil-
ton, Executive Secretary of the Western Uni
Economic Situation in the Orient."
tarian Conference and Dean-Elect of the Abra-
ham Lincoln Center will be guest preacher.
Sermon: "Living Today."

NORTH SIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
1123 Broadway, NO 2-6317
Dwight H. Anderson, Pastor
9:45 A.M. Church School.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.

TONIGHT AT 8

Department of Speech
tin Daly's Sensational 1

Presents
867 Melodrama

August

"UNDER THE GASLIGH T"
$1.25
BOX OFFICE OPEN 10 A.M.-8 P. M
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

About to take the plunge into the business and pro-
fessional world? See the man from Olin Mathieson
for the full story on how that company offers oppor-
tunity unlimited in the fields of metals, chemicals,
packaging and high energy fuels and propellants.
Check with the Engineering Placement Cffice for details about the
Olin Mathielon Chemical Corporation
460 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y.
----------------

11
7

A.M. Junior High LRY Group.
P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Informal record
party. Students are invited to bring records
to play over church's new hi-fi equipment. Re-
freshments. Transportation available promptly
at 6:45 from Lane Hall, Michigan Union and
Stockwell Hall.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: An Appreciation
of God.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD
7:00 P.M. Congregational Church. Speaker: The
Rev. Cary Sayres, Allen Park, Mich.: CHRIS
TIANITY AND POLITICS.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zillgitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour,
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. "The Church-Our
Opportunity." Sermon by Reverend Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship 10:45 A.M.-Dr. Parr will preach
on "Pedestalled in Triumph."
Pilgrim Fellowship 5:30 P.M.
Student Guild 7:00 P.M. The Rev. Carl Sayres of
Allen Park will speak on "Christianity and
Politics."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY: 3 Morning Worship Services-
9:00, 10:30, and 12:00 Noon.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, on Christian Beliefs
11:30 A.M. Graduate Coffee Hour.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Forum, "Proclamation
of the Word."
Tuesday 4:15 P.M. Question Box.
Wednesday, 4:15 P.M. Quiet Hour.
Friday, 6:30 P.M. Graduate Supper.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:15 Meetings for Worship.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends Meeting.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service
6:00 Student Guild
7:00 Evening Service
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Prayer .Meeting
WE WELCOME YOU.

r,

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor

Sunday-9 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
6:00 P.M. Supper-Program following
7:00 P.M. Dr. George Mendenhall, Dept.
Near East, will speak and show pictures of
year in Jerusalem.
Wednesday 7:20 A.M. Matins
Thursday 9:30 P.M. Vespers

of
his

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at'8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenirgs - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon fol-
lowedubysa student breakfast at the Canter-
bury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M. Graduate Canterbury
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper
7:00 P.M. Prof. Samuel Eldersveld and the Hon-
orable George Sallode will speak on the topic
"Christian Issues of the Election."'

SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Road
Reverend Phillip L. Schenk
Phone: NO 2-4663
10:00 A .M .Sundav Service. -

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
8:00 -P:M: Wednesday, Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339

m

02: ? :: {.iw }t . '::'r:v}G'k {4 s ....... _ _. ....:4ri4in{ vj{:?C

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

i

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan