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October 30, 1956 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-30

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PAGE BMX

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OC'. O 34, 1959

PAGE SiX lIKE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, OC1~~BER 30, 1956

PROFS. OFFER VIEWS:
Effects of H-Bomb Discussed

PROF. STRODTBECK:
'U' Sociologist Explores
American Jury System

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 1)

t

bated in the campaign, with the
Administration claiming no seri-
ous detriment will result from
tests alone and Stevenson claim-
ing "unmeasured damage" to the
human race.
The arguments have centered
around two alleged. hazards ---
genetic damage from general ra-
diation and bone cancer from
Strontium 90, a radioactive by-
product of some nuclear explo-
sions.

I

Discounts Danger
Prof. Frank Bethell of the med-
ical school, a consultant for the
Atomic Energy Commission on the
biological effects of irradiation,
discounted the possible dangers
of Strontium 90 and what im-
provements a ban on hydrogen
tests might bring. "The hydrogen
bomb contributes far less than the
fission, or atomic bomb does," he
commented. However, the deton-
ator of a fusion device must be a
fission bomb, which does contri-
bute "some" Strontium 90.
He predicted that if present
trends in6 tests continue, the "sat-
uration" or maximum point of
concentration will be reached, and
the material will "start to decay.
faster than it increases." Even
then, he added, "the amounts
won't be very serious."
Prof. Bethell professed more
concern over the genetic implica-
tions of hydrogen tests. "Any ra-
diation is somewhat dangerous,"
he commented, "from the genetic
standpoint."
Prof. David Nanney of the zool-
ogy department agreed, comment-

ing that "there's no such thing
as an insignificant amount of ra-
diation. Any amount is bound to
increase genetic mutation to some
extent."
Desires Elimination
While conceding that "on the
average one receives more radia-
tion from X-rays than from this
greatly diffused material, I share
with most geneticists the feeling
that any amount of radiation that
can be eliminated should be.
"We simply don't know enough
right now about the effect of a
particular dosage on the genetic
apparatus."
He spoke for the "conservative
point of view - let's keep it as
low as possible."
Prof. James Neel of the medi-
cal school, geneticist in the Insti-
tute of Human Biology denied
there is "any imminent biologi-
cal danger of great significance"
from the tests, suggesting that a
ban on hydrogen explosions would
have "more merit from the stand-
point of world politics."'
He quoted estimates that Amer-
icans experience thirty times as
much radiation from X-rays as
from nuclear tests, but said that
"we also stand to profit" from
X-ray examination. He said the
same standards might also be ap-
plied to the hydrogen tests.
The Stronium problem was also
discussed by Prof. Howard Latour-
ette of the radiology department,
who said the material has the
"peculiar property of being con-
centrated in bones," after entering
the system through the eating of
dairy products. "We don't know

too much about it," he conceded.
bone cancer problems, together
Considering the genetic and
with "whatever other effects we
don't know about," Prof. Latour-
ette concluded that "there is some
danger in going ahead from a
strictly medical viewpoint," but
he agreed with Prof. Neel that
this should be "balanced against
what harm not testing the wea-
pons might bring about."
Supporters of the Stevenson
proposal tend to argue in favor
of it more for its effects on our
foreign relations than the candi-
date himself has done.
Prof. Marshall Knappen of the
political science department said
a ban on hydrogen explosions
"would help us greatly with the
neutralists and won't hurt us with
our allies. We are already being
hurt by our insistence on continu-
ing the tests. We're being painted
by the Soviets as a bunch of mili-
tarists.
John White, instructor in the
p o1it i c a1 science department,
agreed that "it would be in the
best interests of the United States
to assure the world we're not go-
ing around brandishing hydrogen
and atomic bombs."
Prof. Efimenco of the depart-
ment said "a certain amount of
leadership status is involved be-
tween the United States and the
Soviet Union."
He concluded that there is
"nothing to be lost" by going
ahead with a hydrogen moratori-
um, and "something to be gained
by enhancing the prestige of the
free world."

By JAMES BOW
"The jury will announce its deci-
sion."
How has this verdict been
formed?
This is the essense of the tech-
nique being used by Prof. Fred L.
Strodtbeck of the sociology depart-
ment, as a part of a study of the
American jury system.
In analyzing and questioning the
legal system, Prof. Strodtbeck de-
scribes a "partnership" between
two fields, research and practical
application.
"There is an established tradi-
tion of cooperation between bio-
logical research and medicine," he
commented, "but partnership be-
tween a behavioral science, such as
sociology, and law is not yet gen-
erally established."
Illustrates Aspects
In innustrating some aspects of
this "partnership" Prof. Strodt-
beck went on to explain some of
the procedures, questions, and
findings of the study, which is
still in process.
Prof. Strodtbeck, who began his
research at the University of Chi-
cago Law School, works with par-
ticipants from jury pools in Chi-
cago and St. Louis.
The jurors listen to a previously-
recorded trial, then delibaerate and
return a verdict to the judge.
These decisions, as well as re-
cordings of the jury's deliberation,

are then compared with other deci-
sions on the same or very similar
trials.
For example, one series of trials
involves an auto negligence case.
In all versions the plaintiff has
received the same injuries, but in
half the cases the defendant
clearly violated the law by going
past a stop sign.
In the other half, he went
through a light that had just
changed from green to red.
Check Assumption
The motive behind this particu-
lar variation was to check the legal
assumption that negligence is
whole, either present or absent-
the award to the plaintiff should
ideally not be affected by the de-
gree of negligence.
The experiments show that the
awards dropped from $41,000 to
$34,000 when the clarity of negli-
gence decreased.
The project concerns itself with
many problems-the role of the
jury foreman, the problem of jury
selection, and the affect of men-
tion or non-mention of attorney
fees upon the variability of awards.
Prof. Strodtbeck said the objec-
tives of the research was not im-
mediate reform, but rather the
establishment of a working part-
nership between the bench and
the behavioral sciences for con-
tinuing study of the "recurring
and difficult problems of law."

(Continued on Page 4)
Kraft Foods Co., Chicago., 111. - men
in LS&A, BusAd., Science and Archi-
tecture for Personnel, Purchasing, Sales
and Production in Chicago and other
principle cities.
Fri., Nov. 2
Cadillac Motor Car, Div.of GM, De-
troit, Mich.-men with B.A. for Finan-
cial Training Program (need not have
an acctg. major, just an interest in
acctg.). Work will be in Cost Estimat-
ing-requiring some engineering back-
ground as Ind'l Mgt., Cost Acctg., Fac-
tory Acctg., Payroll and General Acctg.
For appointments and further infor-
mation contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., ext. 371.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Continental Oil Co., Houston, Texas,
has an opening for a Chemical Mar-
ket Analyst with a B.S. in Chemn. or
Chem. E. and a BBA or MBA, and from
3 to 6 years in Chemical Marketing Re-
search, Commercial Chemical Devel.,
Chem. Sales or Applied Chem. Research,
City of Oakland, Calif., announces an
examination for City Planners with MA
in planning and six months of tech-
nical city planning experience or BA
with two years of technical city plan-
ning. Arrangements will be made to
give the exam in locations convenient
to the candidates.
Steuben Sets
SBX Meeting
Organizational meetings for Stu-
dent Book Exchange are set for
9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday
nights in room 3Y of the Union,
according to Norton Steuben, '58,
manager of the exchange.

Kyova Fiber Pipe Co., Ironton, Ohio,
is niterested in hiring an Engr. with a
B. S. in Mech. or Chem. E. and about
five yearS experience in the Mainte-
nance of Plant Machinery and/or In-
dustrial Engineering work..
Portland Cement Assoc., Chicago, Ill.,
needs a man for Market Research. Pre-
fer a man with an MBA and experience
in Market Research.
Acme Industries, Inc., Jackson, Mich.,
is looking for a man with experience in
Product Design in Air-Conditioning
and Refrigeration for Product Design-
ing and Field Sales Work.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admn.
Bldg., Ext. 371.

Garg Sales
November 7
According to rumors from the
usual uninformed sources, the
"Plowboy" issue of Gargoyle will be
sold November 7.
Obviously intended as a "Play-
boy" satire, "Plowboy" is said to
have a real live cover girl, and
numerous other photographs scat-
tered throughout its 64 pages.
Other alarming features are a
fold-out apartment party drawn by
art editor Robert Maitland, two
tories by Jim Dygert, and an X-ray
of Bobbi Hard, circulation gitl.

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Saturday, November 3 at 8 P.M.
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