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October 23, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-23

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TUESDAY, OCTORM 23,1954

THE MICIIIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMEt

TUESDAY OCTOBER 23, 1958 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

'Hin sdale,

Weitley,

Heyden

Whin

I'llJ

Grid

Til0

..........________________i ________,".~ - -~".,.,.,~.-....,

(" -

Scenefrom the
4 .EL NE S
by Dick Cramer
Minnesota Threat Looms
AS IT must be on Tuesdays during the football season, thoughts
turn from of the preceding Saturday's performance of the Michi-
gan football team to prospects for the weekend ahead.
After a "breather" that turned out to be not quite a breatherl
last week against Northwestern, the Wolverines cannot expect an
easy time of it this Saturday either. They take on a Minnesota squad
that is a strong contender, along with Michigan, for the Big Ten
championship and the bid to the Rose Bowl.
Present Conference standings show the Gophers in fourth place,
one position above the Wolverines. Coach Murray Warmath's eleven
has two Big Ten victories over Purdue and Illinois, while beingI
held to a scoreless tie in the rain against Northwestern.
You can be sure the Gophers will be fired up for the Homecoming
game this Saturday at the Stadium. A victory for them would put
Michigan in a desperate position in its battle for the top of the Big
- Ten. The Wolverines would have two losses. Minnesota then would
be able to lose a game (probably to its toughest opponent after Mich-
igan -- Michigan State) and still stand ahead of Michigan in the
standings.
Concern over the other eligible contender for the Rose Bowl,
undefeated Iowa, wouldberonly slight, because the Hawkeyes have
Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio State on their schedule on succes-
sive weeks.
That's a summary of the dreams of Minnesota. But the play
of the Wolverines to date indicates they are quite capable of dealing
with the Gophers.
Saturday's 34-20 victory made it all the more evident that of-
fense has replaced defense as the key to Michigan's gridiron suc-
cess. The Wolverines have a 125-56 point edge over their first, four
opponents as compared with their four-game 1955 record of 96-18.
.i.
Sustain Drives.. .
THE difference is even clearer when one recalls that the Michigan
football team of last year made a large share of its points by
capitalizing on opposition mistakes. This year the Wolverines have
repeatedly shown they're capable of the long scoring march.
Reliance on a strong defense has been relaxed somewhat be-
cause Michigan now has the varied and consistently powerful at-
tack it has lacked in recent years.
This is not to say the Wolverines are any weaker on defense; on
the contrary, they have a completely veteran line. But the head-
lines have gone to the offensive stars - Terry Barr, Jim Pace, John
Herrnstein, Ron Kramer and the other backs and ends - who have
produced at least five touchdowns on three of the last four Saturdays..
Injuries may be the major stumbling block for Michigan this
coming Saturday. Although most of the casualties from the North-
western game have :already recovered, Coach Bennie Oosterbaan ex-
pressed concern yesterday over the condition of Barr who is suffering
from a severe charley horse inside his knee.
The prospect of Barrs possibly missing the. Minnesota contest
is very disquieting. Already recognized as one of the best defensive
backs in college football today, he has also become a dependably fast*
and smart runner. His average yardage gained per carry is a team-
leading 6.2 and his passing has been responsible for some of Michi-
gan's longest gains this season.

Gomberg, Cooley Remain
Unbeaten; Williams Upset

QUESTIONABLE STARTER-A top defensive back and Michi-
gan's leading ground gainer, Terry Barr (41) is a questionable
starter in this week's game with Minnesota. He sustained a severe
charley horse in last Saturday's action with Northwestern.
EastSurprises Big T'en;
Penn S tate Downs OSU

By RUDE DiFAZIO
Hinsdale knocked Williams from
the unbeaten ranks with a 6-0 up-
set in Residence Hall "A" football
Monday afternoon.
Wenley followed the pattern by
defeating previously u n b e a t e n
Scott while Heyden scored a mild
upset over Kelsey.
In the biggest surprise of the
day Hinsdale scored on a pass from
Pete Parker to Bob Bolton and
then hung on to gain the victory.
Scott Surprised
Wenley not to be outdone sur-
prised Scott by getting off to a 7-0
lead in the first half on a touch-
down and extra-point by Dick Le-
may. Scott bounced back early in
the second half on a scoring pass
from Jack Mogk to Don Weise.
Wenley scored again, however,
taking the victory, 13-6, on a
touchdown by Norm Dane.
Heyden's defeat of Kelsey came
on a score in the first half by cap-
tain Jim Parkington. The victory
put Heyden over the .500 mark and
leaves them with a mathamatical
chance to tie for first place in their
division.
Gomberg, leading their division,
was hard pressed in the first half
by Allen pumsey but gained mo-
mentum to win 20-7.
The Big Red was plagued by a
mix-up in signals which resulted
Correction
L a s t Thursday Phi Rho
Sigma defeated Law Club, 1-0,
and Friday Owen Co-op edged
Wesleyan, 2-0, not the reverse
as reported in last week's Daily.
in a string of offside penalties in
the early minutes of the game.
They rebounded, however, to en-
joy a 7-0 halftime lead on a pass
from Brue Fox to Bill Wheat. A
toss from Fox to Fred Channon
made the extra-point.
McVay, Treder Score
In the second half Fred McVay
and Don Treder scored touchdowns
to insure the victory.

Cooley House remained unbeat-
en with a 20-0 victory over Adams.
Cooley was led by Bruce Conybare
who passed for two scores and an
extra-point and scored the other
seven points on his own.
In the only fraternity game of
the afternoon Pi Lambda Phi de-
feated Sigma Alpha Epsilon 19-12
in the Social "B" league despite
the fact that Dick Agnew scored
two touchdowns for SAE.
In other games Anderson scored
three touchdowns in the second
half to beat Chicago, 25-13; Win-
chell rolled over Reeves 27-0; and
Huber beat Taylor 18-9. The Mich-
igan-Strauss game was postponed
because the field was littered with
rubbish left by Sunday afternoon
picknickers.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.'
14.

Minnesota at MICHIGAN
California at Washington
Colgate at Yale
Iowa at Purdue
Kentucky at Georgia
Maryland at Tennessee
Miami (Fla.) at TCU
Michigan State at Illinois
Navy at Pennsylvania
Northwestern at Indiana

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

North Carolina State at Duke
Oklahoma at Notre Dame
Oregon at Pittsburgh
Oregon State at UCLA
USC at Stanford
Texas at Rice
Texas A&M at Baylor
Tulane at Georgia Tech
Wake Forest at N. Carolina
Wisconsin at Ohio State

Grid Selections
It was a disastrous weekend for the "experts" on The Michigan
Daily Sports Staff whose forecasting percentage was a dismal .561,
or approximately 11-9.
However, Phil Smith of 1223 Hill Street wasn't fooled by the
many upsets as he posted an amazing 16-4 mark to win two free
tickets to either the State or Michigan theatres.
Entries may be mailed or brought in person to "Grid Picks,"
Student Publications Building, 420 Maynard Street.
Please send your name, address and telephone number on the
entries and be sure to pick the score of the Michigan-Minnesota
game as this will decide multiple ties.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

Michigan Grid Statistics

FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
NET YDS. RUSHING
No. of Attempts
Yds. per Attempt.

MICH. OPP.
70 43
48 33
20 9
2 1
851 659
212 176
4.01 3.74

PUNTS 14 . 21
Average Distance per Punt
33.8 36.8

KICKOFFS,

'RETURNED BY
12

By BOB BOLTON
De-emphasized eastern football
may not be in the same class as
the Big Ten version but you'll
never prove it by looking at Penn
State.
The Nittany Lions rolled into
Columbus Saturday and beat un-
defeated Ohio State at its own
ball possession sgame by a 7-6
count. Penn ran' 75 plays to the
Buckeyes 58 and their persistance
payed off when they shoved across
a touchdown in the fourth quarter.
MSU, Iowa, Ind. Win.
Ohio, however, was 'the only
team to rub luster off the Big Ten
reputation as college football's
t o u g h e s t Conference. Michigan
State, Iowa and Indiana all won
non-conference tilts.
In an attempt to climb into first
place in the national ratings Mich-
igan State poured six second-half
touchdowns through a battered
Notre Dame defense to completely
crush the Irish, 47-14.
For the second straight week the
Spartans showed the ability to
move through the air as well as on
the ground.

Junior quarterback Jim Ninow-
ski engineered an 83 yard touch-
down drive by throwing three times
for 55 yards and Dennis Mendyk
fired 16 yards to Mike Pantich for
another tally.
Indiana Edged Nebraska
Indiana found the winning com-
bination for the first time'this sea-
son as they countered twice in the
second half to edge Nebraska,
19-14.
The Hoosiers who have lost
twice in Conference play this year
showed little strength in their vic-
tory Saturday and cannot be re-
gardeduas a threat to their more
powerful Conference foes.
In a practice for future Big Ten
games Iowa used mostly second
and third stringers in racking up
Hawaii, 34-0.
The Hawkeyes who are casting
envious looks at Pasadena and a
possible Conference title displayed
little for opposing scouts to take
back with them in Saturday's
romp.
Gophers Sniff Roses
Minnesotadrew a bead on the
Rose Bowl by squeezing past high-
ly favored Illinois on Dick Bor-
stad's fourth-quarter field goal,
16-13.
Gopher quarterback Bobby Cox
put on a fantastic one man show
as he scored both Minnesota
touchdowns and set up the field
goal.
In the other Conference con-
test Purdue and Wisconsin fought
to a 6-6 deadlock. The Badgers
muffed five other scoring oppor-
tunities when their attack bogged
near the goal line.
For Hair Styling
That Satisfies,
next time try
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FUMBLES 11
Ball lost, by fumbles 8

18
18
15

NET YDS. PASSING 462
Forward Passes Attempted
51
Forward Passes Completed
29
Passes Had Intercepted

319
44
18

PENALTIES
Yds. Penalized
POINTS

17 17
155 175
124 56

3 0

% of Passes Completed
56.9
Yds. Per Pass Attempted
9.1

NET YDS.-RUSHING
Number of Plays
Yards per Play

AND
1313
263
5.0

40.9
7.25
PASSING
978
220
4.45

Herrn
Barr,
Ptace
Pace,
Sham
Madd
VanP
Byers

INDIVIDUAL RUSHING
ATT. NET
astein, fb 53 237
hb 35 218
k, hb 20 82
hb 44 158
non, hb 10 30
lock, qb 7 26
elt, qb 12 -13
, fb 10 28

AVG.
4.5
6.2
4.1
3.6
3.0
3.7
-1.1
2.8

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Two Mid-West surpises, the Chi-
cago Cardinals and the Detroit
Lions, continued their winning.
ways last Sunday aft remain aloft,
as the only unbeaten teams in the
National Football League.
While these two clubs are lead-
ing their divisions, it is interesting
to note that last year's champions,
Los Angeles and Cleveland, are
presently inhabiting the cellars.
HSU Lineman
Injures Knee
EAST LANSING, (A) -- Tackle
Pat Burke, one of the standouts
in Michigan State's line play, may
be out for the season as a result of
a knee injury suffered in the 47-
14 beating of Notre Dame last
Saturday.
It is feared that Burke tore a
ligament in his right knee. If
X-rays turn up the suspected in-
jury, the junior linesman from
Massachusetts probably will ride
the bench for the rest of the sea-
son.

v

The Cards had to come from be-
hind in their 20-6 win over the
Philadelphia Eagles. Trailing 6-3
at the end of three quarters, the
powerful Cardinal offense finally
exploded for 17 points in the final
quarter to win the game.
In the other division, the De-
troit Lions held their lead as they
edged the San Francisco '49ers 20-
17. The big gun in the Lion attack
was quarterback Bobby Layne who
scored 14 points and completed 15
passes for 14 yards.
Layne's 17-yard field goal with
17 seconds of play remaining broke
the 17-17 deadlock and kept the
Lions ahead of the second place
Chicago Bears who have suffered
one loss.
Bears Slaughter Colts
The Bears literally slaughtered
the Baltimore Colts, whd inflicted
the only Chicago loss in the open-
ing game of the season, as they
rolled to a 58-27 win.
Enos Bill McColl and Harlon
Hill and fullback Rick Casares
each scored a pair of markers in
the Bear romp. ''
Quarterbacx Chuck C o n e r 1 y

threw three touchdown passes and
set up a fourth as the New Yo'k
Giants retained second place with
a 38-10 win over the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
The Giant offense accumulated
a grand total of 455 yards against
the Steelers in their new home at
Yankee Stadium.
The lowly Washington. Redskins
won, their first football game of
the season as they beat last year's
World Champion Cleveland
Browns, 20-9.
Quarterback Tobin Rote passed
for three tallies and set up a
fourth, as a fired up Green Bay
team sent last years division
champions, Los Angeles, to a 42-
17 defeat.

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John C. Nettleton expects to receive his B.S. in chemical engineer-
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Roberti. Such, M.S., Ch.E., came to the Engineering Devel-
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the University of Louisville four years ago. Since then, he has
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search programs. Within the last year, Bob has taken the re-
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Grasselli Research Division.
N advanced degree would undoubtedly have a favorable
effect in technical work, John, but let me enlarge on
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But I've noticed this at Du Pont. Once a man lands a
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So an advanced degree is not a royal road to anything
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