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October 20, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-20

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OICT6AER 20,1959

~AGK ~!X THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. OCT6AER 20.1958

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BENEFITS OF DATING:
4U'-TV Series Features
Marriage Preparations

By EDWARD GERULDSEN
Plenty of dates with a variety of
companions are an important step
toward a happy marriage, accord-
ing to Prof. Robert Blood, host for
the University TV Hour series on
"Marriage."
In the first program of the ser-
ies, presented at 10 a.m. tomorrow
on WWJ-TV, Prof. Blood, Univer-
sity sociologist and a marriage
counselor, will discuss the benefits
of dating in preparation for mar-
riage, getting acquainted with
varying personality types, learn-
ing to get along with others in
close association and other similar
points.
Dramatic flashbacks, depicting
successful dates, unsuccessful dates
and a bad marriage traced back to
the courtship period will be used
in illustration.
The marriage series will follow
the framework of Prof. Blood's
book, ,"Anticipating Your Marri-
age," which is used in the marriage
course he teaches at the University.
In later programs, Prof. Blood
will interview psychologists, econ-
omists, doctors and educators on
such topics as courtship, physical

adjustments in marriage, money,
in-laws, and divorce.
Marriage problems of all sorts
will be discussed by husbands and
wives, clergymen, marriage coun-
sellors, career women, authors and
parents, and real-life situations
will be dramatized.
WPAG-TV, the local UHF out-
let, will begin telecasting the series
on Thursdays at 9 p.m. beginning
Nov. 15.
The second half of the TV Hour
tomorrow will begin a series on
music, "Haydn to Hi-Fi," featuring
the Stanley Quartet, with appear-
ances by the Baroque Trio and the
Woodwind Quintet.
Host for this series will be Prof.
James O'Neill of the French de-
partment.

Organization
Notices
Congregational and Disciples Student
Guild, Open House, After Game, Guild
House.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
Swimming Party, 8 p.m., Women's Pool
Hillel Supper Club, 6 p.m., Sunday, Hil-
lel.
* M *
Graduate Outing Club, Hike and Sup-
per, 2 p.m., Rackham Building.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion,
7 p.m., Sunday, First Unitarian Church,
Transportation furnished at 6:45 from
Lane Hall, Union and Stockwell and
at 8 p.m. to Concert.
* * *
Union, Quarterback films fo North-
western Game., 8 p.m., Union Ballroom
* * *
Russkii Kruzhok, Meeting, 8 p.m.,
Monday, International Center,
* * *
Student Religious Association, Folk
Dancing,, 7:30-10 p.m., Monday, Lane
Hall.
Hillel Social Committee, Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Tuesday, Hillel.

Ban1 Denies
Favoritism
Officials of the Ann Arbor Bank
have denied discriminating against
students as charged in posters
distributed on campus yesterday.
The posters said there exists "a
double standard, one for students
and one for the other citizens of
Ann Arbor."
Students are barred from having
savings accounts. Special checking
accounts are available for a
"price."
The bank said they will not allow
anyone to take out a savings ac-
count for the purpose of using it
as an expense account but students
are free to open regular or special
checking accounts.
Special accounts used by many
non-students are more economical
than regular ones for people who
write few checks, they added.

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Come

to Church

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN.

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(Continued from Page 4)
Training. This is the oldest Canadian
life insurance company and has facili-
ties for service in Canada, the U.S.,
the United Kingdom, Ireland, Hawaii
and Bermuda.
Moore Business Forms, Detroit, Mich.
--men, draft exempt, any degree (acctg.
Helpful) for Sales and Mgt. Training
Program. Moore is not only the largest
manufacturer of business, but also the
largest manufacturer of one-time car-
bon, and has factories and offices
throughout the U.S.
Wed., Oct. 24
Federal-Mogul-Bower Bearings, Inc.,
Detroit, Mich. - men in LS&A or Bus.
Ad. for Sales, Mfg., Mgt., Pers. Admin.,
and Acctg. work in Mich., Ohio, Pa.,
Calif and sales offices in all large
cities. Manufactures sleeve type bear-
ings, roller bearings, ball bearings, etc.
Argus Cameras, Inc., Ann Arbor, Mich.
--men with any degree for Sales Train-
ing. Training period is in Ann Arbor,
then location anywhere in U.S. Is possi-
ble. y
Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit and Ann Arbor area - men
in LS&A and BusAd for Sales Mgt..
Training. This is one of the ten larg-
est insurance companies in the country
with branches throughout the U.S.
Wed. & Thurs., Oct. 24 and 25
U.S. Women's Army Corp. - women
students for Officer Training.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
Ext. 371,
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver,
Colorado, has openings for Mechanical
Engineers with up to five years ex-
perience to work in the Denver area,
and for Chemical and Electrical Engrs.
for Construction Projects in any of 17
Western. States.
For information contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
ext. 371.
CIVIL SERVICE:.
Application forms for the Federal
Service Entrance Exam to be given Nov.
10 are available at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments. The deadline for filing is
Oct. 25. There will be other of these
exams given throughout the coming
year. They are open to men and women
in any field,
Applications and information for the
Foreign Service Exam are also available.
Deadline is Oct. 26.
It

NORTH SIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
1123 Broadway, NO 2-6317
Dwight H. Anderson, Pastor
9:45 A.M. Church School.
1 1 :00 A.M. Worship Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Mr. C. H. Loucks and Mr. D. Day, Ministers.
Student Advisor, Mrs. C. Mahone.
Events for Sunday
9:45 A.M. The Bible Class will continue the study
of The Old Testament with the Book of Num-
bers.
11 :00 A.M. Morning Worship. Layman's Sunday.
"The Responsible Layman and His Church."
Loren Campbell, Mr. Boyd, Professor Kellum
and Mr. Beecher are participating.
6:45 P.M. Professor Nancy will speak to the Rog-
er Williams Fellowship on "A Christian view of
the Political Situation."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10 A.M. Unitarian Church School.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group-Dr. John Pitkin,
psychiatrist, will speak on "Childhood Disturb-
ances: Their Cause and Recognition."
11 A.M. Service of Worship. Sermon by RevEd-
ward H. Redman on "The Piece de resistance
of Unitarianism."
11 A.M. Junior High LRY Group.
7 P.M. Unitarian Student Group. Mr. Wray
Smith, Research Associate at the Willow Run
Research Center and treasurer of the church,
will lead a discussion on "What Is Liberalism?".
Transportation to the church available prompt-
ly at 6:45 at the Michigan Union, Lane Hall,
and Stockwell Hall.
Monday, 8 P.M. Unitarian Men's Grup at the
church.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9 & 11 A.M. Worship Services-Corm-
mm union.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. International Student Supper.
7:00 P.M. Program by Lutheran International
Students.
Wednesday 7:20 A.M. Matins.
Thursday 9:30 P.M. Vespers.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 AM., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 12
noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M. Newman Club Rooms in the Father Rich-
ard Center.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon follow-
ed by a student breakfast at the Canterbury
House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M. Braduate Canterbury
5:30 P.M. Canterbury Evensong.
6:00 P.M. Buffet Supper.
7:00 P.M. The speaker will be Professor Vincent
Scanio of the University of Michigan who will
speak on Dante.
SAINT CLARE OF ASSISSI MISSION
EPISCOPAL
2305 Packard Road
Reverend Phillip L. Schenk
Phone: NO 2-4663
10:00 A.M. Sunday Services.
10:00 A.M. Church School.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL and CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday, 4:15: Open House After Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with sermon by the pastor, "On Maturing
Spiritually."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Discussion of "The
History and Meaning of 'The Order of
Matins.'
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
HiH and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: CHRISTIAN
CONCERN AND WORLD COMMUNITY.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU-
DENT GUILD:
7:00 P.M., Congregational Church. Speaker:Prof.
Preston Slosson: WHY I AS A CHRISTIAN
WILL VOTE THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL &
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur D. Zilitt, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
10:15 A.M. Student Guild Coffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. "Builders of Peace."
Sermon by Rev. Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Public Worship at 10:45 A.M. Sermon by Rev.
Leonard A. Parr on "Changing Astronomies;
Unchanging Stars." Reception of members,
followed by coffee hour.
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. Speaker: Prof. Preston
Slosson, His subject will be "Why 1 as a Chris-
tian will Vote the Democratic Ticket." .
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Wi. S. Baker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
SUNDAY: 3 Morning Worship Services.A
9:00, 10:30, and 12:00 Noon.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Christianity and Politics."
11 :30 A.M. Grad Coffee Hour, Lewis Room,
5:30 P.M. WSF Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Forum Movie-"The
King's Men."
Monday and Thursday, 4-6 P.M. Coffee Break, Pat
Pickett's apartment, 21 7 S. Observatory.
Tuesday, UCF. Lecture, "Christian Ethics and
American Foreign Policy"-topic, "Is There
An American Way in Foreign Policy?" Prof.
Muehl of Yale Divinity School; 4:15 P.M.
Aud. A.
Wednesday: 4:15 P.M. Quiet Hour.
Thursday: 4:15 P.M. Bible Study, "The Chosen
Peoples," League.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:15 Meetings for Worship. Also fron
10:45 to 11:45,
10:45-11:45 Sunday School.

Gobs See Panama, Cuba
a N '.;' Sailors Ship
SiX Weeks
1KSouthward
z~
Life as a midshipman during a
summer cruise, as any University
-> :-NROTC student will agree, isn't
all work and no play.
Last summer a group of juniors
y .. \ enrolled in the NROTC curricu-
lum boarded the U. S. S. Newport
SNews, a heavy cruiser, for a six-
week voyage to New Orleans, Cuba
-<$and Panama.
Regular daily work hours and
\ jobs were assigned the "middles"
throughout the cruise, but there
were free hours both on ship and
in port and movies were shown on
deck nightly.
Flying Fish Visit
In the Florida area, visitors
ENTERING THE PANAMA CANAL-Enlisted men (left) prepare to cover ship's deck with tarpau- came aboard ship while the movies
lin for protection from the heat, small boat ( center) brings pilot aboard ship for eight-hour trip were shown at night. Flying fish
through canal, and enlisted men (right) lift buffers over the side of the ship for protection, soared over the Newport News but
many didn't quite make it and
some of the ship's officers found
themselves with fish in their laps
During the day, midshipmen-
who are recognized by a black
,,q .k~~n; ,,". _. ;band around the rim of their sail-
or caps-were assigned to one of
16 work areas, the groups rotat-
T ing every three days.
r.; . f Up at 6 a.m. daily, the 300 mid-
dies on board the Newport News
went to work stations and then
heard lectures on their jobs before
taking time off for lunch-and
sunbathing, for which they had
e ยง an hour or more each day.
Sailors Ready
The sailors had to be ready for
special unannounced dri tha
t: might be called at any hour of
' the day.
Without warning, the General
Quarters, Fire Stations, Battle Sta-
y tions or Abandon Ship Stations
A k calls might be given.
In order to avoid confusion, the
gobs could only go in one direc-
tion through corridors and up lad-
ders on one side of the ship, in
"x .::the other direction and down lad-
ders on the other side of the ship.
A major complaint during the
xa ,...h.r r summer was the heat, constantly
-b,.. over 90 degrees, while the humi-
_,.dity stayed near 100 per cent.
HIGH-LINE STATION-"White Hat" travels RADAR SCREEN-Used to direct anti-aircraft In Panama, a tarpaulin had to
between ships to negotiate trade of movie films guns to target. "E" is an award of merit for be raised to cover the decks as a
for the evening's show on deck excellence in shooting competition,. protection from the heat.
Going through the canal at
Panama was anyeight-hour trip.
A pilot boarded the ship at one
6 3end of the canal to guide the ship
' through one way-and that was
ycn his full working day.
Remember 'Mr. Roberts'
t, nd Much of the trip was reminis-
cent of "Mister Roberts" well-
' known voyage.
Officers wre tropical uniforms
below the equator - lightweight
coats and bermda shorts.
' Short stays in Panama and
? Cuba provided brief night and so-
cial- life for the ship's crew, much
as in the "Mister Roberts" saga.
Sailors had to bargain with cab
drivers in Panama for trips around
the country-and everyone in Pan-
xa $ ama could paint "Taxi" on his car
.~, ~and he was in business.
~ ~ And the captain of the U. S. S.
:X. I...... Newport ews, the flagship of the
a ;. Y.. fleet, had a potted palm tree out-
.0 side his cabin door.

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DAILY
I PHOTO
FEATU RE
Photographs By
RICHARD GASKILL
Story By
VERNON NAHRGANG

SHIPS SLOW FOR "REFUELING OPERATION-The oiler U.S.S. Pawcatuk (above) delivers fuel to
the U.S.S. Newport News while at sea. Lines are shot from one ship to the other, and heavier and
heavier lines are gradually passed between the ships until they are strong enough to transport the
pipe line. Spray at oiler's side keeps oil from collecting on its deck.

0"
=..+
mm'.

C/)
. FLEURETTE C
$995
Out off
the Famous
Red Shoe Box

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship. "God's Tomorrow
For The World." Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Two discussion groups.
"History of the Hebrew People."

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets.
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 Sunday School.
1 :00 Morning Worship Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting.

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