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October 12, 1956 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-12

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER. 12,1856

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRThAY, OCTOBER 12, 19~6 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TI1RE~

SO WHO REMEMBERS?
In 14-Hundred And 92,
He Sailed An Ocean Blue

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:

'Playboy' Ban Infuriates Collegians'

By DALE MC GHEE
Can it be that Christopher Col-
umbus is a forgotten man?
Only 464 years ago this open-
minded gentleman, first set foot
on Western Hemisphere terra fir-
ma and discovered Indians.
And just who will pause today
in silent meditation, to utter a
simple eulogy or to gaze thought-
fully at a world globe in memory
of Christopher Columbus. No one,
it seems.
A fervent search has failed to
reveal any isolated individual
planning to honor the man who
discovered our homeland.
Neither rain nor sleet nor black
of night nor Christopher Columbus
can part the loyal mailman from
his appointed rounds.
No motley parade with blaring
bands will march up Main Street
today.
Ann Arbor High School has
given its assurance that if classes
were not being dismissed today
(due to a conference), it would
Bike Parking Law
To Be Enforced

surely be paying tribute to Col-
umbus. Nevertheless, no tribute
is being paid.
From no lecturn will flow a spe-
call speech to honor the man who
valiantly guided the Nina, Pinta
and Santa Maria.
It is truely unfortunate that
some group in this center of in-
tellectualism is not doing justice
to the person who reshaped the
world and discovered the Indians.
No Indians could be reached for
comment.

University of Mississippi stu-
dents wereangered by a recent ac-
tion, removing Playboy magazine
from the local newsstands in or-
der to "protect" the students.
The students suggested a few
less drastic plans than complete
banishment. They included mak-
ing students show their draft
cards, written permission from
their parents, or a certificate from
a competent psychiatrist testify-
ing that the student is mentally
and emotionally capable of read-
ing the magazine.
At Michigan State University,
however, Playboy is leading the
field in sales of popular maga-
zines. A recent survey reports that
716 issues per copy are sold, indi-
cating that "MSU males like at-
tractive dolls - even when they
are only paper dolls."
* *4 *.
For those of you who are still
lamenting the results of last Sat-
urday's football game, here is an
encouraging note from UCLA's
Daily Bruin. When Coach Red
'Sanders was asked to comment on
the trouncing Michigan gave his
team, he admitted, "We were com-
pletely outclassed in every depart-
ment." When questioned as to just
how good the Wolverines are, he

replied, "We were so generous to
them you can't tell how good they
are.'
Midwestern state universities en-
rollment figures are all on the up-
grade. Ohio State and The Univer-
sity of Wisconsin reported this
year's enrollment to be about 23,-
000 and 22,067 respectively. It
Boyden Plans
Music Talk
David Boyden will speak at 4:15
p.m. today in Aud. A on "The 17th
and 18th Century Concerto in Fact
and Fiction."
Boyden is profesor of music and
chairman of the music department
at the University of California.
His main field of interest is the
history of violin playing and is
authoring a book on that subject.
Also scheduled to speak in the
series are Karl Geiringer, Gustave
Reese, Kath Meyer-Baer and Su-
zanne Bloch.
Geiringer, professor of Music
and head of graduate studies in
music at Boston University will
speak at 4:15 p.m., November 14
in Aud. A.

looks like Michigan is still the un-
disputed champion with 25,473.
Harvard went in just the oppo-
site direction this year. The re-
ported that Freshman class appli-
cants, consequently class enroll-
ment, was the smallest since the
war.
* * *
Ohio State University has had
the election year problem of a
rising third party on campus. It
seems that someone has been dis-
tributing circulars urging that the
reader "Vote Socialist Labor Par-
ty."
Copies of this handbill have
been stuck 'among books and pa-
pers that students have momen-
tarily left untended. The pamphlet
goes on to say that "humanity-
stands today on the threshhold of
a new social order. The old order-
capitalism is doomed . . . War re-
mains the only real alternative the
capitalists have to economic col-
lapse."

NO NEED to be
1THIRSTY!'
0 Come to

KEG BEER
ICE CUBES
114 E. William St.
Between
Main and Fourth Ave.
Phone NO 8-7191
- OPEN
Doily 10 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
" BEER "

Be a 1.. .C
The
1956
M USKET
Show,
needs:
actors
actresses
staffers
kilts

WE HAVE ICE CUBES

Astronomy
To Feature

Talk
Moon

WINE

o SOFT DRINKS

"The Moon" will be the subject
of the Astronomy Department's
Visitors' Night at 8 p.m. this eve-
ning in Rm. 2003 Angell Hall.
Robert C. Bless, graduate stu-
dent in astronomy, will be the
speaker. Following the illustrated
talk, the Observatory on the fifth
floor of Angell Hall will be open
for observation with telescopes
and binoculars, if the weather is
clear.

0 U

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