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October 07, 1956 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7,1954

...- . .....

;

PAGEw Ei1~fZG _________

Charitable Organization
Gets, Salvages Glasses

i i i 1 - - -

Earring Fad
In Britain
BLYTH, England (A') - Three
13-year-old girls who insist on
wearing earrings to school were
segregated recently from their
classmates.
Headmistress R. W. Leddicoat
called the trio into her office and
told them they would have to
study there until the result of an
appeal to their parents becomes
known. The girls are Anne Street,
Joan Brown and Ann Kane.
"This earring thing has become
a craze," said the headmistress.
"Some of the girls are even
piercing one another's ears with
darning needles."
She said she thought 13 was far
too young for girls to wear ear-
rings and added that no girl had,
ever done so before in her school.
The first parental reaction was
in favor of earrings.

Religious
Association
Established
To achieve greater coordination
between religious groups on cam-
pus the Office of Religious Affairs
at Lane Hall reports a change in
their program planning commit-
tee.
The Council of Student Religious
Organizations is replacing the Stu-
dent Religious Association, for-
merly an executive council work-
ing with Lane Hall activities.
The new council, comprised of
representatives from religious or-
ganizations on campus, will serve
as a "fact finding, clearing coun-
cil for all religious groups," ac-
cording to Harold Durkson, pro-
gram director in the Office of Re-
ligious Affairs.

Hopkins To
Meet Rhodes
Rhodes Scholarship aspirants!
are requested to meet at 4:15 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 10, in Rm. 2013 Angell
Hall, for vital information con-
cerning formal application.
The University has not had a
winner in years, relates Prof. Clark
Hopkins, Prof. of classical art and
Archaeology and a former Rhodes
scholar.' "We hope to get a really
good group trying so that they
may have a chance," Prof. Hopkins
said.
Though an applicant need only
be of junior standing, most of the
winners have been either seniors
or persons in their first year of
graduate studies.
The emphasis of the awards is
not expressly scholasti^ attain-
ment. Recipients have been men
of all-around ability endowed with
the moral, physical, and literary
ideals of manhood he pointed out.

All unmarried male citizens of!
the United States between the ages
of 19 and 25 who have at least;
five years residence and are of at
least junior standing are eligible
for a Rhodes grant.
A candidate who, however,
"would otherwise be over the age
limit but who has had at least 90
days of active service in the Armed
Forces of the U.S.A. since June
27, 1950, may deduct the period
of his service from his actual age
if by so doing he will qualify under
the regulations."

A Rhodes Scholarship carries
with it a stipend of 600 pounds a
year, or approximately $1,500, for
a minimum of two years to be
spent in pursuing further educa-
tion in one of the colleges of the
University of Oxford.
Mr. Cecil Rhodes bequeathed the
scholarship fund to foster Anglo-
American relations with the fond
hopes that Rhodes alumni would
become the precursors in creating
a peaceful and prosperous world.
Thirty-two Rhodes Scholarships
are annually available to the

United States. Competition for the
32 scholarships is meted out in
both state and district contests.
Regulations state that "A candi-
date my apply either in the state
in whic hhe resides or in the state
in which he resides or in the state
at least two years of his college
education." Applications must be
received by Oct. 19 at Rm. 2026
Angell Hall.
Further information on Rhodes
Scholarships may be obtaingd at
the Oct. 10 meeting or from Prof.
Hopkins, 2011 Angell Hall.

REFERENCE

SALVAGED SPECTACLES-Woman worker sorts thousands
of eyeglasses to be sent abroad.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SHORT HILLS, N.J.,-One ofv
the Country's most unusual char-
ities recently announced its 1956-l
57 goal from its headquarters here
in this pleasant suburban com-
munity. It wants no money, only
eyeglasses-350,000 of them.
This unique, goal was set by
New Eyes for the Needy, Inc., a
non-profit, non.sectarian organi-
zation of 40 local women dedicated
to helping others help themselves
by making it possible for them to
see normally. The old glasses col-
lected by the group will be used
to defray the most of new, individ-
ually fitted, prescription lenses for
thousands who need but cannot
afford them.
New Eyes for the Needy salvages
the precious metals in the frames
of glasses received as donations
from all over the country. Dis-
carded jewelry and other items
containing precious metal are col-
lected. The metal is melted down
and sold and the proceeds pay
for new prescription glasses. It
takes about 40 old pairs to pay for
a single new pair.

Literally hundreds of pounds of
plastic framed lenses are also re-
ceived in each week's mail and
these are carefully examined by
a testing committee working under
the supervision of an optician.,
Simple near-sighted and far-sight-'
ed lenses, as well as special high
power cataract glasses, are dis-
tributed to missions and hospitals,
in foreign countries. .Missionaries
in Africa, Borneo, Burma and the
Philippines in acknowledging the
receipt of shipments, report that
people, travelling by foot, frequent-
ly came hundreds of miles for
glasses. To insure that each person
receives suitable glasses, each pair
is tagged according to strength
before distribution. Testing kits,
complete with instructions, are
sent to remote areas where no eye
doctor or diagnostic facilities are
available. Recently 1,800 pairs of
sunglasses were .sent to lepers,
whose eyes are super-sensitive to
light, at the famed leper colony of
Airaku-en, on Okinawa.

(Continued from Page 4)
Oct. 9 in the East Lecture Room of the
Rackham Building. C. H. Combs of the
Psychology Dept. will speak on "Mathe-
matical Models and Measurement
Theory in the Social Sciences". Open
meeting..
History 279 (Proseminar in Renais-
sance History) will meet Mon., Oct. 8,
4 p.m. in 2449, Mason Hall.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Air-shields, Inc., Hatboro, Pa., is
looking for a Salesman to sell hospital
and medical supplies in the Detroit

area. Must be draft free and have some
exprience in sales. There will be a repre-
sentative from the company in De-
troit to interview applicants during
the week of October 29.
For appointments contact the Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Admin., Bldg.,
Ext. 371.
Registration With The Bureau Notice:
Meetings will be held Tuesday, Octo-
ber 9, at 3 o'clock and at 4 o'clock, in
Auditorium A of Angell Hall, for stu-
dents interested in registering in either
the Teacher Placement or General
Placement Division of the Bureau of
Appointments. Each meeting is open to
all students, who may come at the
time most convenient for them.

The General Division includes posi-
tions in the Physical and Health Sci-
ences, Business and Industry, Social
Work, etc. and the Education Division
includes all levels of Elementary, High
School, and College teaching and ad-
ministrative positions.
Since employment interviews begin
on Monday, Oct. 15, it is urged that
students take blanks at this time and
return them as soon as possible so
that we will have records to give to
the interviewers.
Men who are facing military service
after graduation are also urged to regis-
ter and are encouraged to talk to inter-
viewers with an eye to employment aft-
er their release from active duty.

All Subjects

4

Thousands at 19 andup
ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE
Opposite Engineering Arch

i

II

4

Atomic Reactor To Be Started

.t

By DIANE LaBAKAS
The University's atomic reactor
will go "critical" next month.
Construction on the reactor,
which began in spring, 1954, is
nearly completed. All that needs
to be done is assembling fuel ele-
ments, checking out the control
system, and seeing that every-
thing is in proper working order.
"The reactor will go critical al-
most at once," said Roger Leather-
man, assistant to the director of
the Phoenik Project. "The reactor
will start at a few watts of power.
It will take approximately six
months or a year to get the reactor
operating at full power," he de-
Leatherman pointed out that the
reactor must be checked thor-
oughly before it can operate at full
power. "Each reactor is different

from another and all behave dif-
ferently," he explained.
The reactor will be primarily
used for research and educational
purposes, Leatherman rsaid. He
noted that the reactor will serve
research and education needs for
several years in the future and
doubted whether any others would
be constructed by the University.
"The educational use of the
reactor is one of its most impor-
taht assets," Leatherman stated.
"The checking out will prove valu-
able for students interested in
nuclear work. Principles used in
working with the reactor will be
almost exactly the same as those
students will encounter in work-
ing on other nuclear projects," he
said.

f

will

HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hilt Street
ANOTHER SUNDAY
SUPPER CLUB
OCT. 7 . .. 6:00 P.M.
2 Corned Beef Sandwiches
Dill Pickles Potato Chips

need
*att

-4

YI L

Sir iAau

A

,*

Cokes
MEMBERS 75c

Fruit Salad
NON-MEMBERS $1.00

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tripled our facilities so that we are better able to
serve you.

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